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Remotely-piloted Altair unmanned aerial vehicle

Are you interested in working for or developing products in the aerospace industry?  Want to research the latest information on small satellites or reusable rockets? Want to know about Europe’s Clean Sky research program? Have you booked your trip to the moon? 

The Stanford libraries subscribe to a suite of research tools that can help you plan for your future in the aviation or space industry. Newspace Global tracks the leading companies and reports on the growing marketing for reusable rockets, small satellites and space vehicles.  IHS Janes is the go to source in the aerospace industry for the specifications and details on the latest aircraft and avionics systems.  Aviation Week Intelligence Network (AWIN) includes all issues of Aviation Week & Space technology from 1997 to the present plus downloadable spreadsheets on aviation manufacturers, suppliers, and the airline industry world-wide. As part of our subscription to AWIN, Stanford students can download and install a Zino version of the current issue of Aviation Week and Space Technology to a smart phone or tablet. Need more sources of information such as standards, articles, and books?  Review the Terman Engineering Library topic guide for Aeronautics and Astronautics.

'The Dish (HDR)' (under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

A couple of weeks ago, Stanford University Libraries hosted Dame Wendy Hall, Jim Hendler, and other web scientists affiliated with the Web Science Trust for a briefing on the Web Observatory initiative and a follow-on workshop organized by Lisa Green from Common Crawl. The notion of a Web Observatory implies a center proferring scientific instruments, but for the analysis of web data rather than natural phenomena. Indeed, the group's vision is that Web Observatories provide access to web datasets, projects, and tools. Eventually, a network of Web Observatories might offer both an interoperable architecture and distributed infrastructures for sharing and analysis of web datasets. The initiative touches on several areas of interest and investment by Stanford University Libraries, including data curation, web archiving, and supporting social science research.

Social science research increasingly depends on computational methods and digital primary materials. As a case in point, the listserv of the Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR), an organization for social science research on networked communications, features regular discussions on web data collection and analysis. A perusal of those conversations underscores the dearth of reusable web datasets and the one-off nature of new datasets that are created. In the context of research data more broadly, it is for this and other reasons that research libraries increasingly offer data curation services. Persistent access to well-described data is only one part of the puzzle, though; as Victoria Stodden noted in the 2013 Forum on the Future of Scientific Publishing, the review, reproduction, and/or reinterpretation of computational analyses also demands the continued availability of the employed applications (PDF). The Web Observatory architecture natively recognizes this requirement.

The web archiving community meanwhile collectively hosts petabytes of historical web data and grapples with the specification of the fundamental set of services (PDF) to support common research use cases. Common Crawl itself provides access to hundreds of terabytes of web data through Amazon Web Services Public Data Sets platform. Working with (a manageable subset of) this corpus was the focus of the follow-on workshop. The research that the Common Crawl data is more broadly enabling (including by Stanford-affiliated researchers) is a useful demonstration of the interest in web datasets, the kinds of services that researchers may be interested in, and the potential of the Web Observatories initiative.

As we continue to develop our web archiving services, in particular, we will look for opportunities to align with and contribute to the Web Observatories framework.

Stanford Solar Decathalon House, 2014

Is your passion sustainability and green buildings? Need information on new materials and green products for buildings and landscaping?  The Stanford Libraries subscribe to the BuildingGreen Suite which includes access to current articles, product specifications, case studies and LEED resources. Also included in this resource is the full-text current issue and archive of Environmental Building News (EBN).  You can also download articles from EBN to your tablet or smartphone.

Additional resources on green buildings are included in the Green Building topic guide.

Trucost logo

Interested in balancing your portfolio or partnering with companies that have a “greener” footprint? It isn't just about carbon or fossil fuels; it's also about water, land use, waste and pollutants. It's about which raw materials are used and where they are sourced, from energy and water to metals, minerals and agricultural products.  And it's about how those materials are extracted, processed and distributed. 

The Stanford Libraries provide access to the Trucost academic research portal for faculty, students and staff. The Trucost academic research portal provides access to time–series data on over 4,800 global companies to help you analyze companies and industries based on the natural resources used and environmental impacts across company operations, product lifecycles and supply chains.  Additional information for researchers is also available on the Trucost website.

sign up

Finding the best tool for your research and using it efficiently is a challenge for all students.  The Stanford Libraries offer workshops to help you increase your skill level and explore new resources.  Sign-up to learn about citation management tools such as Mendeley, EndNote and RefWorks as well as how to search for grants, patents, chemical information, energy information and how to keep current with new research.  This year we have added a new workshop on tips and tools for publishing. The Stanford Geospatial Center in the Branner Library offers workshops on GIS data creation and management, GPS and mobile data collection and ArcGIS.  All workshops are free and all Stanford students, faculty and staff are welcome.  Workshops are held in the Green Library, Swain Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Library, Branner Earth Sciences Library and the Huang Engineering Center. View the list of Fall 2014 workshops and sign-up.

San Francisco Ferry Building and streetcar: one of thousands of images used by the Image, Video, and Multimedia Systems research team to test image search algorithms

When you think about scientific data, you might think primarily about numbers and graphs and charts. But some data sets consist of rich image collections, including these data sets that have been preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository!

 

ORCID logo

Is your research confused with others who have a similar name as yours? Do you have problems distinguishing between authors with similar names?

As an author or  researcher you need to be able to easily and uniquely attach your identity to your scholarly output including datasets, articles, books, citations, and experiments.  You want to be sure you are recognized for the great work you do! The best solution is to register for your personal ORCID id to claim your publications and connect your scholarly contributions.

Seven new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These new collections take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Undergraduate Theses, Department of Biology, 2013-2014 

Honors theses written by undergraduates in the Stanford University Department of Biology, 2013-2014.

Collection Contact: Hannah Frost

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