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Three new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These collections take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Data

Abstract: These items are intended for use in Stanford Geospatial Center teaching materials.

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

This exhibition honors faculty research from the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences. Many of the papers highlighted in this exhibition are seminal works in the fields of energy, environmental sciences and climate change, and geologic and geophysical research.

Ever wondered what the most checked out books by Stanford authors were at Branner Library? So did we. Included in the exhibit are two such titles that are frequently used: Introduction to Geochemistry by Prof. Dennis Bird and Reservoir Geomechanics by Prof. Mark Zoback. Other notable titles are more recent, such as books authored by Dean Pam Matson and Prof. Rosamond Naylor.

A sampling of faculty titles on display at Branner Library.

In response to Friday’s powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake in Nepal, Stanford volunteer “crisis mappers” are working with Humanitarian OpenStreetMap to assist in disaster relief by mapping Nepal’s road networks, buildings, and residential areas.

Anyone with a laptop and spare time can help responders on the ground. The Stanford Geospatial Center housed in the Branner Earth Sciences Library will be hosting ongoing Introductory Relief Mapping sessions all week to help train people to use OpenStreetMap, an open source and open data sharing tool adding information to relief effort maps. Drop-in volunteers are encouraged to join all day from 9am-9pm, Monday-Friday.

The first Introductory Relief Mapping session will be held Monday, April 17 from 6-7pm at the Branner Earth Sciences Library Teaching Corner, on the 2nd floor of the Mitchell Earth Science Building.

Salmon data in EarthWorks

Stanford University Libraries is happy to introduce EarthWorks, our new geospatial data discovery application. EarthWorks is a discovery tool for geospatial (a.k.a. GIS) data. It allows users to search and browse the GIS collections owned by Stanford University Libraries, as well as data collections from many other institutions. Data can be searched spatially, by manipulating a map; by keyword search; by selecting search limiting facets (e.g., limit to a given format type); or by combining these options.

Christine Borgman giving keynote address at Data Day 2015

Did you miss Data Day 2015? No worries -- most of the slide presentations and videos of the event are now available online!

At the Data Day 2015 web site you can download the slides directly or click over to YouTube to watch videos of each of the speakers.

Data Day was held at the Li Ka Shing Center of Monday, April 13 and focused on the latest developments that make data sharing easier and advance the progress of reproducible research and data reuse. Attendees heard from Stanford faculty from biomedicine, psychology, sociology, and engineering, as well as from our keynote speaker, Christine Borgman, who is Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA.

Read more about the event at our web site.

Data Day logo

We are pleased to announce that Data Day 2015 will be made available live via BlueJeans!

On the morning of the event, click here to authenticate into BlueJeans using your SUNet ID. This service is only available to individuals with a Stanford ID. Up to 100 people will be able to watch the event from 8:30am to 1:00pm. First come, first served!

Nearly 250 people signed up within 48 hours of the announcement of the event, which will take place April 13, 2015 at the Li Ka Shing Conference Center at Stanford.

The Science and Engineering Libraries and the Lane Medical Library have teamed up to create an event for graduate students, post-docs, and undergraduate researchers. Gear Up for Research Day on Monday, April 6 will have multiple activities including an information fair, lightning talks, demos, and publisher workshops.

Campus organizations and units attending the event include the Office of Research, Biosciences Grant Writing Academy, ICME C2 Consulting, the Stanford Geospatial Center and the Technical Communication Program.  External participants representing publishers and research tool vendors such as Mendeley, EndNote, JOVE, PeerJ, IEEE, Annual Reviews, Elsevier and Springer will also offer lightning talks and workshops.

It only makes sense that if you were making solar cells or computer chips that you would choose the best materials for those tasks. It's a no-brainer, right? The problem is that the best materials might be very expensive to use. 

Such has been the case with gallium arsenide, but this may be changing.

Bruce Clemens and Garrett Hayes have developed a new way of making chips from gallium arsenide that brings down the cost considerably. They created a video that describes a new manufacturing process, and they have preserved that video in the Stanford Digital Repository for you to download and watch!

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