Blog topic: Science

Stephen Henry Schneider

The Stephen H. Schneider Collection

April 9, 2014
by Pennington P. Ahlstrand

The University Archives recently completed a CLIR-funded project to process the papers of the late Dr. Stephen Schneider. Steve was a professor who taught Bio 15N, Bio 147, ES 10, ES 15 and ES 179, among other classes. Steve was very well-liked by students and collaborators alike per his student and peer evaluations. Steve grew up on Long Island and attended Columbia University, where he received his bachelor’s, master’s and PhD.

SDR Deposit of the Week: Micrographs that touch a nerve

You might not think of worms when someone mentions neuroscience, but it turns out the tiny, transparent worm C. elegans is a great organism for studying the senses. That's in part because researchers have previously mapped the locations and synaptic connections of each of the 302 neurons of these 1mm long creatures. 

More recently, researchers Juan Cueva and Miriam Goodman have performed studies using C. elegans to examine how certain touch receptor neurons are activated. They generated nearly 3300 electron micrographs of worm cross sections that have been preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) and are now available for download and reuse by other researchers around the world (see below for links to the images).

PowerPoint slide from SDR online deposit on Anthopleura Sea Anemone Distribution in the Rocky Intertidal at Hopkins Marine Station

New digital collections available in SearchWorks

Four new digital collections were added to SearchWorks via Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) online deposit during the month of March. These collections take advantage of recently released functionality that provides researchers with new rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Sea otter, image by Mike Baird

Marine mammal data get their day in the sun

February 10, 2014
by Amy E. Hodge

If you've ever been there, you know that Hopkins Marine Station (HMS) is a special place. But it's not just a special place for those of us who love the gorgeous views; it's a special place for scientists as well. Which is why it's such a treat that researchers at Hopkins Marine Station continue to make more of their historical research data available to others through the Stanford Digital Repository.

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