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Journal of Chemical Education - April 2014 issue

Chemists Celebrate Earth Day is an ACS annual event that seeks to bring international focus to environmental topics, such as clean air, water, and energy, to illustrate the positive role chemistry plays in preserving Earth. The 2014 theme—The Wonders of Water—features the unique properties of water that are crucial for life and a cleaner environment.

Steve Schneider [photographer unknown].

Dr. Steve Schneider was inspired to be involved in climate change and global warming in part because of Earth Day.

Like his eco-ally Carl Sagan, Schneider was a scientist able to Successfully get information to the public. Sagan had his television show Cosmos (recently revitalized by Neil deGrasse Tyson and Sagan’s widow, Ann Druyan—check your local listings).

Schneider wrote popular science books, did radio interviews around the world and appeared in movies and on television.

Here he is with Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show on July 19, 1977.  Clip courtesy of  UCAR/NCAR. 

Stephen Henry Schneider

Dr. Steve Schneider talks about how he became interested in earth systems and in atmospheric research in this excerpt from an interview done by Gray Thompson in 1992

“I was actually born in New York City. I didn’t live in it until I went back to Columbia University 17 years later. And I grew up in [Woodmere,] Long Island. And what I remember enjoying a lot about Long Island before the developers hacked down all the woods was getting dropped off in a square mile of woods which I used to call “the deep, dark forest…” and run around and just enjoy streams and nature.

Stephen Henry Schneider

The University Archives recently completed a CLIR-funded project to process the papers of the late Dr. Stephen Schneider. Steve was a professor who taught Bio 15N, Bio 147, ES 10, ES 15 and ES 179, among other classes. Steve was very well-liked by students and collaborators alike per his student and peer evaluations. Steve grew up on Long Island and attended Columbia University, where he received his bachelor’s, master’s and PhD.

You might not think of worms when someone mentions neuroscience, but it turns out the tiny, transparent worm C. elegans is a great organism for studying the senses. That's in part because researchers have previously mapped the locations and synaptic connections of each of the 302 neurons of these 1mm long creatures. 

More recently, researchers Juan Cueva and Miriam Goodman have performed studies using C. elegans to examine how certain touch receptor neurons are activated. They generated nearly 3300 electron micrographs of worm cross sections that have been preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) and are now available for download and reuse by other researchers around the world (see below for links to the images).

PowerPoint slide from SDR online deposit on Anthopleura Sea Anemone Distribution in the Rocky Intertidal at Hopkins Marine Station

Four new digital collections were added to SearchWorks via Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) online deposit during the month of March. These collections take advantage of recently released functionality that provides researchers with new rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

"[T]he oceans have always belonged to the clams."

At least from a metabolic perspective, according to Earth Sciences Professor Jonathan Payne and his co-authors. The researchers have just published an article in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences about the struggle for dominance between brachiopods and bivalves.

We are pleased to welcome Pennington Ahlstrand to Special Collections. Penny has accepted a position as the Project Archivist for the Gordon Moore project and will be working primarily out of our new Redwood City location. 

Penny has worked as a corporate archivist and archival consultant in the Bay Area since 1997. For over 10 years she worked part-time on large processing projects at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory – most notably the Web Wizards collection (the first US website was at SLAC), the papers of Nobel laureate and former SLAC director Burton Richter, and the papers of the man who built SLAC and was its first director: W.K.H. "Pief" Panofsky.

This is Penny’s third position in Special Collections. She began at Stanford working on the processing team for the Apple Computer Inc. records held by Stanford University Library. Most recently, she is completing a CLIR grant for the University Archives division to process the Stephen Schneider papers. She now comes full circle and returns to the Manuscripts division.

 

 

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