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bX Recommender logoA trial of bX Recommender has been added to SFX (the Find it at Stanford links) maintained by the Stanford Libraries.  Thanks to Alexis Manheim and Holly Thomasen for their work to customize this tool for SUL.

bX Recommender is a service developed by ExLibris to work with SFX to help researchers discover additional relevant articles. Recommendations are based on the usage of millions of researchers around the globe. Starting with the article the user is looking at, bX Recommender checks what other articles were used together with that article and then displays a list of other relevant articles on the SFX results page.

Science of Synthesis Online

Science of Synthesis (SoS) provides a critical review of synthetic methodology developed to-date in the fields of organic and organometallic chemistry. Features include:

  • Selection of molecular transformations by world-renowned experts with elaboration on scope and limitations
  • Full-text descriptions of synthetic methods with practical experimental procedures immediately applicable in the lab
  • Community of over 1,000 experts involved in the review and updating of methods
  • Logical organization of the synthetic methods for each functional group
  • Intuitive search functions to allow rapid lead generation and route optimization

Our data management services web site is all new and improved, and we invite you to check it out, have a browse, learn something new, and tell us what you think!

We have expanded the existing content, added tons of new and useful information, and reorganized everything to make it all easier for you to find and use.

The Mathematics & Statistics Library is now open at its new location on the 3rd floor of Herrin Hall (kitty-corner from Bldg. 380), sharing space with Falconer Biology Library. You can still reach the Math-Stat Library staff at (650) 723-4672 and mathstatlibrary@stanford.edu.

Tours of the new location of the Math-Stat Library will be held on:

Monday-Thursday, 1/6-1/9 at 3pm
Monday & Tuesday, 1/13 & 1/14 at Noon
Thursday & Friday, 1/23 & 1/24 at Noon

The Mathematics & Statistics Library is merging with Falconer Biology Library.  The merged library will be located in Falconer’s space in Herrin Hall (3rd floor, diagonally across from Bldg. 380).  More information is available on the Math/Stat and Biology Library Merger Web Page.

Stereoselective synthesis of drugs and natural products

Noteworthy online reference works of potential interest include:

  • Comprehensive enantioselective organocatalysis: Catalysts, reactions, and applications
  • Encyclopedia of membrane science and technology
  • Stereoselective synthesis of drugs and natural products
  • UV/Vis+ Spectra data base

CrossMark logo

"What happens when the record of scholarly research published in journals, books, proceedings or other documents changes? As careful as authors, reviewers, and publishers are in the publication process, corrections, updates, errata, and even retractions and withdrawals are sometimes necessary. But how can researchers find out about these important changes?" Learn more about CrossMark. Please also see this press release: CrossRef Members add over a quarter million CrossMark records; Researchers click on CrossMark logos 50K times per month (November 13, 2013)

Percentage of Americans who believe global warming has been happening.

The Stanford Geospatial Center has created a series of maps in support of the work of Professor Jon Krosnick who released new state level data on Americans' view of climate change.  Dr. Krosnick, a senior fellow with the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, presented the findings to the congressional Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change.  The Stanford Report released an article on November 13, 2014 discussing Dr. Krosnick's work, which shows that the majority of residents in every state surveyed supported government limits on greenhouse gas emissions, tax breaks to encourage solar power production, and energy efficient appliances. 


Twelve maps were produced by Patricia Carbajales and David Medeiros, both of the Stanford Geospatial Center located in Branner Library.  The maps include visual representations on a state by state basis of the answers to such questions as whether or not global warming has been happening and if it has been caused by humans.  As if often the case, these visualizations allow for enhanced understanding of complex spatial data quickly through the use of a map of the United States.

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