You are here

Stanford Digital Repository



Rock fractures

Faculty retire, projects end, and the outputs of important research languish on forgotten hard drives and servers. It happens all the time. But retiring Professors Atilla Aydin and David Pollard wanted to be sure it didn't happen to them. For 25 years they co-directed the Stanford Rock Fracture Project (RFP) in the Geology and Environmental Sciences Department, but they were concerned about the long-term availability of the research outputs of that project once they retired. 

Until they found out about the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR).

Tip jar

Check out these 5 tips from the trenches on writing a great data management plan (DMP) for your next research grant proposal. These tips are based on feedback given about real-life data mangement plans! Find out more about data management plans from our web site.

Don Knuth

The University Archives is pleased to announce that videotaped lectures from Don Knuth's computer science course Mathematical Writing (CS209), given in the fall of 1987, are now available online. The course focused on issues of technical writing and the effective presentation of mathematics and computer science. Guest lectures included Herb Wilf (University of Pennsylvania), Jeff Ullman (Stanford), Leslie Lamport (Digital Equipment Corporation) , Nils Nilsson (Stanford), Mary-Claire van Leunen (Digital Equipment Corporation) , Rosalie Stemer (San Francisco Chronicle), and Paul Halmos (University of Santa Clara). The class notes are available as a Stanford report, Mathematical Writing, and a published book.

Theremin demonstrating his instrument, Stanford University, 1991

Earlier this year, I reported on recent work the Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) had undertaken to preserve video footage of Leon Theremin's visit to Stanford in 1991. In addition to participating in a symposium during his visit, hosted by the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), Theremin was also the guest of honor at a concert held in Frost Amphitheater on September 27, 1991 during the Stanford Centennial Finale Weekend. The video footage preserved by the ARS earlier in the year unfortunately only included part of this notable concert. It was found to be missing some key performances, including an arrangement of Rachmaninov's Vocalise, featuring Theremin's daughter Natasha Theremin playing the vocal parts on her father's instrument, accompanied by Max Mathews conducting the orchestral parts with his radio batons. This footage was presumed lost...until now. 

Three new digital collections were added to SearchWorks during the month of July. This brings the total number of digital collections available in SearchWorks to 93. The collections recently added are:

Title: A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory mesocosms

Abstract: Software code to accompany the manuscript "A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory aquaria" by L.P. Miller and J. D. Long

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

Two new digital collections were added to SearchWorks during the month of June. This brings the total number of digital collections available in SearchWorks to 90. The collections recently added are:

A novel computational method of metabolic network analysis for genetic discovery

Abstract: Java scripts for re-production of the computational method being published in Pharmacogenetics and Genomics 2012, 22:877–886

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

Undergraduate Theses, Department of Biology, 2014-2015 

Abstract: Honors theses written by undergraduates in the Stanford University Department of Biology, 2014-2015.

Collection contact: Michael Newman

The integration of digital collections into SearchWorks means that items from collections containing digital material can be discovered in the course of searching and browsing through the totality of Stanford's vast library catalog.

For more information on depositing materials into the Stanford Digital Repository, visit our website. For questions or additional information about the Stanford Digital Repository service, please email us at

The Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) recently deposited two significant collections into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR), the Terry Smythe AMICA Collection and the Stanford Soundtrack Collection.

Researchers at Stanford are doing a lot of innovative and intriguing work. Their efforts are often highlighted in the Stanford Report, which provides readers with a brief compilation of the latest Stanford News via email each weekday. When those of us at Stanford Libraries who work on digital preservation read these articles, we immediately wonder what these researchers are doing to preserve all that wonderful research data.

Never ones to rest on our laurels, Stanford Libraries staff have been reaching out to these researchers and recommending that they preserve the data generated from these studies -- and sometimes submitted to journals as supplementary data files -- in the Stanford Digital Repository. We would hate to see all that innovative and intriguing work lost to the ravages of time!