Blog topic: Stanford Digital Repository

Gear Up for Research

Gear Up for Research Computing

Are you using computing in your research?  Do you have questions about Stanford's complex array of computing resources?  Join Stanford Libraries and the Stanford Research Computing Center for our annual Gear Up for Research event:

Gear Up for Research Computing

Tuesday, February 26, 9:45 am to 2:45 pm

Hartley Conference Center, Mitchell Earth Sciences Building

Register at: https://library.stanford.edu/projects/gear-research/winter-2019

Graph of pageviews

SDR Deposit of the Month: Dissertation on AI breakthrough makes leaderboard

Occasionally I review the analytics for content published via the Stanford Digital Repository to see what is currently trending. Upon returning to my Lathrop desk in January after the recent winter break, I checked in and discovered that a dissertation submitted last month by student Danqi Chen had enjoyed a whopping 2,736 pageviews in just four weeks since it was published on December 11, 2018. That is an extraordinarily impressive number!

Your data + Google Dataset Search

January 16, 2019
by Amy E. Hodge

"I was wondering if you know anything about getting datasets discoverable on Google Dataset Search?"

We recently received this query from a Stanford researcher who had deposited content into the Stanford Digital Repository.

The short answer: request a DataCite DOI from Stanford Libraries, which you can do by emailing doi-contact@lists.stanford.edu.

For those of you unfamiliar with Google Dataset Search or who are interested in the details behind the response, read on! 

SDR Deposit of the Month: Making news the “Big Local” way

December 21, 2018
by Regina Lee Roberts

When Bethney Bonilla deposited the U.S. Rape Clearance Data (2014-2016) , in the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR), she was putting into place a key piece of a larger, coordinated effort to break a troubling national news story: some police departments use a loophole to clear rape cases despite not having made related arrests, resulting in inflated clearance rates that are often cited as a measure of police effectiveness.

Mission Beach Amusement Park

Sanborn fire insurance map collection online

December 4, 2018
by Julie Sweetkind-Singer

Sanborn maps are a favorite of any map librarian.  What's not to like about them?  They give us a view into the history of our country in a way that few other maps do.  They show the growth and decline of towns and cities.  They track the changing use of buildings over time.  At times they tell us who lived and worked in specific areas.  We peek into the past to understand what kept people entertained, be it an amusement park, a skating rink, a movie theater, or a bar.  The Sanborn Fire Insurance Company began producing these maps in the late 19th century for towns and cities throughout the United States in order to provide information to insurers about the composition and use of buildings to allow for the correct underwriting of policies.  The maps include: building footprints; building material shown by color, height and number of stories; uses such as dwellings, hotels, churches, and chicken coops; street widths, water pipes, hydrants, and cisterns.  This provides historians, genealogists, urban planners, and ethnologist with a wealth of information about the nation's past.  

Hammerhead shark

SDR Deposit of the Month: Endangered sharks of Peru and the ban to save them

November 4, 2018
by Hannah Frost

Note to our readers: The Stanford Digital Repository team is reviving our popular blog series in order to highlight some of the terrific content deposited by our community on a regular basis. Be on the lookout for monthly posts!

When Biology student Julia Grace Mason requested a DOI from the SDR team for her recent dataset deposit, I was pleased to see continued uptake of our DOI service launched earlier this year with Stanford Libraries' new membership to DataCite.  This service is of growing importance to Stanford’s publishing researchers!  While preparing the metadata for the DOI, I had the opportunity to check out what her research is all about. If you are interested in sharks, Peru, ecology, and qualitative-quantitative hybrid research methods, you will agree this work is impressive!

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