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Digging Deeper Logo

In January, Stanford launched Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts, an online learning experience devoted to the technologies involved in creating and interpreting medieval manuscripts. We're off to a roaring start with thousands of enrolled participants across more than 90 countries (and it's not too late to sign up!).  The creation of the course has been a truly collaborative experience: Stanford University faculty and library staff have worked closely with counterparts at Cambridge University, Stanford Academic Technology Specialists, graduate students, and a team from Stanford's Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning to produce a suite of learning materials that have become much richer than any of us envisaged at the beginning of the process in 2013!

Bird Rock weather station

Weather is often a hot topic for discussion (no pun intended!), even here in the usually moderate Bay Area where thoughts on the current drought are frequently proffered. But our discussions of the weather would be baseless if it weren't for weather data and our ability to track weather changes over time.

Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove has been tracking the weather in their neck of the woods for years. Detailed data from this weather monitoring project is now available online via the Stanford Digital Repository in the Hopkins Marine Station collection.

Four new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These collections take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Bucky Conversations: Conversations on the Life and Work of an Enigmatic Genius, 2002-2003 - Collection contact: Glynn Edwards

Abstract: In 2002, to celebrate the acquisition of the Fuller archive, the Stanford University Libraries and the Stanford Humanities Laboratory launched a series of Conversations on R. Buckminster Fuller, alias "Bucky, " inventor of the Dymaxion car, the Dymaxion Dwelling Unit, and the geodesic dome, author of Utopia or Oblivion, 4D Timelock, Synergetics, Tetrascroll and Critical Path. The series consists of filmed interviews with Fuller's key collaborators, interlocutors and contemporaries, and is designed to enhance critical understanding of this enigmatic polymath.

December 13 is a momentous date in the history of the Stanford Digital Repository. It's the date in 2012 when the very first research data item was deposited in the SDR through our online deposit application. Which makes Dec. 13, 2014, the second anniversary of this historic occasion!

Who was our first depositor, how did he find us, and what did he deposit? 

Bridget Whearty and Astrid Smith in the digitization lab

As the CLIR postdoctoral fellow in Data Curation for Medieval Studies at Stanford I work primarily with data about large collections of digitized manuscripts and fragments. For example, I have helped to make our teaching collections more easily discoverable in Searchworks. I've also been bringing together partner institutions' descriptive metadata to feed a specialized manuscript search environment. 

In practice, I write code to transform batches of 70, 300, 500, or 1000+ manuscripts at a time: I've gotten very comfortable thinking of medieval manuscripts in the tens, hundreds, and even thousands. But the truth is that these large batches of digital-medieval manuscripts I curate are built of unique, single objects. Single objects that, just like the physical objects they grow from, are made by individual people, in particular environments, under specific institutional, financial, and social pressures. 

In order to better understand the process that leads to the creation of a digital-medieval book, I recently followed the digitization of a fifteenth-century book of hours, Stanford University Libraries, M0379, from the request for digitization, through the slow hard work of taking the images and hours of post-production labor, to its arrival in Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). 

Five years ago, University Librarian Michael Keller and University Registrar Tom Black announced the availability of the electronic thesis and dissertation submission service.  Since Fall 2009, PhD and Engineering Master's students have submitted over 3,400 theses and dissertations electronically. Assistant University Registrar Reid Kallman notes, “Looking back over the past five years, the electronic thesis and dissertation submission system has been a success. In the most recent academic year we had approximately 98% of our students select the electronic submission option.”

SUL logo

Calling all SUL staff! Have you recently published an article or presented a conference paper or poster that you'd like to archive and share? Perhaps you have some research or a project report relevant to our field that needs a permanent home? Don't forget that as vital members of the Stanford community, the Stanford Digital Repository is available to you, too. In fact, we set up the Stanford University Libraries Staff Publications and Research Collection specifically for this purpose. 

A wild duck lands on Lake Lagunita

Water in the West is a multi-year joint program of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and the Bill Lane Center for the American West.  It is a place where faculty, staff and students from the natural, physical and social sciences, law, business and humanities who engage in interdisciplinary research and teaching about freshwater can meet and collaborate while tackling the challenge of water security affected by a growing population, collapsing ecosystems, crumbling infrastructure, evolving economies, conflicting values and a less predictable and more volatile climate.

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