Stanford Digital Repository | Stanford Libraries

Blog topic: Stanford Digital Repository

Spotlights in the Centre Ceramique, Maastricht

Stanford begins development on Spotlight

by Stu Snydman & Gary Geisler

The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) have a rich and diverse collection of digital content. Users can discover collections and content from the Stanford Digital Repository through the library website, library catalog (SearchWorks), and persistent citation (PURL) pages. SUL also develops robust, custom-built websites for selected  collections (see Parker on the Web and the French Revolution Digital Archive) that provide a rich discovery environment and a range of features that enable users to more effectively work with the collection items. But these sites require significant investment in time and development resources to produce and maintain, limiting the number and variety SUL can support.

Sea otter, image by Mike Baird

Marine mammal data get their day in the sun

February 10, 2014
by Amy E. Hodge

If you've ever been there, you know that Hopkins Marine Station (HMS) is a special place. But it's not just a special place for those of us who love the gorgeous views; it's a special place for scientists as well. Which is why it's such a treat that researchers at Hopkins Marine Station continue to make more of their historical research data available to others through the Stanford Digital Repository.

Open tape reel from Gerhard Samuel Collection, ARS.0049

How accessible are our media collections?

During the fall of 2013, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) convened a working group to investigate the current state of access to audio and moving image materials held within its various collections, notably rare materials within its different special collections departments, along with those held at the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. 

Following many weeks of investigation, the Media Access Working Group (MAWG) produced a report in December 2013 outlining its findings, along with various recommendations to help tackle the issues discovered. The group considered issues relating to use cases, copyright status, available technologies - including media streaming, and content usage. 

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