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Album A: Photographs of China's natural landscapes, urban scenes, cultural landmarks, social customs, and people.

Fourteen new digital collections representing content from SUL, Image, Video and Multimedia Systems - Stanford University and Hoover Archives, are now available in SearchWorks. These collections take advantage of recently released SearchWorks functionality that provides researchers with new rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content. In addition to the 11 collections from Stanford University Archives that Daniel Hartwig blogged about, researchers may now discover:

Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking at Stanford, 1967

The University Archives and DLSS are pleased to announce that eleven digital collections have been added to SearchWorks and can be accessed from the Selected Digital Collections link on the SearchWorks homepage. Representing a variety of formats ranging from manuscripts and photographs to audio and video, the collections include more than 10,000 files and span the history of the University.

Kwangtung Province

In January, approximately 137,000 new files representing over 35,500 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include -- but are not limited to -- items from the Jarnydce Collection, TRAIL Maps Project, and the Revs Digital Library.

Spotlights in the Centre Ceramique, Maastricht

by Stu Snydman & Gary Geisler

The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) have a rich and diverse collection of digital content. Users can discover collections and content from the Stanford Digital Repository through the library website, library catalog (SearchWorks), and persistent citation (PURL) pages. SUL also develops robust, custom-built websites for selected  collections (see Parker on the Web and the French Revolution Digital Archive) that provide a rich discovery environment and a range of features that enable users to more effectively work with the collection items. But these sites require significant investment in time and development resources to produce and maintain, limiting the number and variety SUL can support.

Sea otter, image by Mike Baird

If you've ever been there, you know that Hopkins Marine Station (HMS) is a special place. But it's not just a special place for those of us who love the gorgeous views; it's a special place for scientists as well. Which is why it's such a treat that researchers at Hopkins Marine Station continue to make more of their historical research data available to others through the Stanford Digital Repository.

4chan forum logo

The free-for-all, anything-goes nature of anonymous posting to discussions boards is a defining feature of Internet subculture, and arguably nowhere has this practice been more vigorous or virulent than on 4ChanNow those notorious anonymous posts are available from the SDR

Open tape reel from Gerhard Samuel Collection, ARS.0049

During the fall of 2013, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) convened a working group to investigate the current state of access to audio and moving image materials held within its various collections, notably rare materials within its different special collections departments, along with those held at the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. 

Following many weeks of investigation, the Media Access Working Group (MAWG) produced a report in December 2013 outlining its findings, along with various recommendations to help tackle the issues discovered. The group considered issues relating to use cases, copyright status, available technologies - including media streaming, and content usage. 

The Dragmaticon is Williams' revision, made ca. 1144-50, of his most important work, De Philosophia Mundi. Written in dramatic dialogue form, the Dragmaticon touches on all aspects of "The science of the world," i.e. astronomy, geography, meteorology and medicine. Further, it attempts to reconcile discrepancies between church doctrine and scientific observation.

In December, approximately 366,000, files representing over 43,000 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include -- but are not limited to -- items from the Jarnydce Collection, TRAIL Maps Project, and the Revs Digital Library.

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