You are here

Stanford Digital Repository

RSS

Archives

San Francisco Ferry Building and streetcar: one of thousands of images used by the Image, Video, and Multimedia Systems research team to test image search algorithms

Some of the items most recently deposited to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) include thousands of images that are nothing short of, well, ordinary. For instance, in the Names 100 Dataset, you can download a folder containing 80,000 small images depicting the faces of ordinary people. In another case, there are millions of snapshots of San Francisco street scenes and buildings. Each image is notable for its lack of distinction.  It’s as if anyone could have captured these images using their smartphone. And that is precisely the point.

Mandolin Club

In September, approximately 157,000, files representing nearly 400 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include -- but are not limited to -- items from the Jarndyce Collection, Stanford historical photographs, and the Tanenbaum Collection.

What do you get when you combine 14 library staff, the John A. Blume Center for Earthquake Engineering Technical Reports, the SDR self-deposit interface, and pizza? A Deposit-a-thon, of course!

A lot of valuable research done on Stanford's campus is published as part of technical reports, and as valued research output there is no better place to preserve these -- and make them easily accessible to the world -- than through the Stanford Digital Repository.

Big Game activities -- bonfire

In August, approximately 68,000, files representing nearly 600 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include -- but are not limited to -- items from the correspondence from Athanasius Kircher, Stanford historical photographs, and the journal of the Gorilla Foundation.

Yung-Yidish no. 1, cover.
I'm pleased to announce that the Stanford University Libraries have digitized a complete set of the rare (and fragile) avant-garde Yiddish literary and artistic journal Yung-Idish.  All three issues were published in Lodz, 1919, and the digitized versions are found at the following URLs:
 
 
For background on the Yung-Idish (or: Yung-yidish) group, see the entry in the YIVO Encyclopediahttp://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Yung-yidish.
"The founding of Yung-yidish, the first Yiddish artistic avant-garde group in Poland, grew out of a meeting in 1918 between poet Moyshe Broderzon and a group of visual artists centered around Yitskhok Broyner, Yankl Adler, and Marek Szwarc. Eventually, the group included some 20-odd members including Yitsḥak Katzenelson, Yekhezkl-Moyshe Nayman, and Hershele, as well as younger people discovered by the group, such as the artist Henekh Bartshinski and the writers Elimelekh Shmulevitsh, Khayim Leyb Fuks, and Yisroel Shtern."
 
Yung-Idish was also the subject of a scholarly monograph by the Polish art historian Jerzy Malinowski: Grupa "Jung Idysz" i żydowskie środowisko "Nowej Sztuki" w Polsce, 1918-1923. Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk, Instytut Sztuki, 1987.
 
In addition, I see that there is a Facebook page devoted to the group:
 

Stanford's set of Yung-Idish is part of the Ezra Lahad Collection, which was acquired by Roger Kohn for Stanford in 1998.  The issues, on crumbling thin cardboard stock, were painstakingly conserved by the Stanford Libraries' professional conservators in 2012, prior to their digitization.

High-volume book scanning lab

In June and July, approximately 30,000, images representing nearly 14,000 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include about 12,000 images from the Revs collection, 128 additional books from the Stephen J Gould collection, 43 Inspector General semiannual reports to congress, and a particularly prized volume of the Talmud.

1951 Louis Armstrong Record Label, photo by Klaus Hiltscher

Back in the 1980s, five libraries -- including Stanford's -- undertook an effort to provide better user access to their sound recording collections. The result of this effort was a union catalog of pre-LP disc holdings that made it possible for users to find out what each of the five institutions actually owned.

Word of Mouth

This is a story about the power of word of mouth.

Pages