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1951 Louis Armstrong Record Label, photo by Klaus Hiltscher

Back in the 1980s, five libraries -- including Stanford's -- undertook an effort to provide better user access to their sound recording collections. The result of this effort was a union catalog of pre-LP disc holdings that made it possible for users to find out what each of the five institutions actually owned.

Word of Mouth

This is a story about the power of word of mouth.

Undergraduates are a hard-working group, and nowhere is this truer than here at Stanford. Our undergraduates make frequent contributions to scientific research all over campus, and important contributions are important to preserve. Which is why today's Deposit of the Week comes to us from student Tessaly Jen.

Transformation is a common theme among the eight final student team projects of this year's ME310 cohort. Take, for example, Idéum, which proposes how to transform an old building in a Swedish coastal town into an innovation center for Volvo workers who insist "that they [are] not innovative people." The students ask, and then answer, "How might we build confidence and make a user feel like an innovative genius, with a tool that actually helps develop creative skills?"   

Leland Stanford Junior University insurance maps, 1917

The University Archives is pleased to announe that it has added several items to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) recently. Included amongst the treasures are a variety of University maps and motion pictures, as well as faculty papers. Highlights include:

To-date, over 160 University Archives collections have been added to SDR via self-deposit.

Ochre Sea Stars (Pisaster ochraceus)

Making historical data sets available to the world is one of the many ways the Stanford Digital Repository is promoting data preservation and sharing. This Deposit of the Week from Hopkins Marine Station is a perfect example of that.

Pisaster ochraceus--the ochre sea star--lives along the rocky coast of Central California and the Hopkins Marine Life Refuge. Studies of the ochre sea star population over time help scientists better understand what is happening to the population and how outside forces like the reintroduction of a possible predator or local environmental changes can affect it. 

Some of the latest work underway in Digital Library Systems and Services involves adding digital collections to SearchWorks. Last week saw the addition of five new collections to SearchWorks, all created and deposited to the Stanford Digital Repository using the Self-Deposit web application.

Of the five, we’re highlighting Preserving Virtual Worlds, a collection produced by curator Henry Lowood and a team of collaborators in a multi-institution project funded by the Library of Congress. Original software, gameplay samples, technical documentation, web sites, and other contextual information for games like SimCity, DOOM, and Star Raiders are archived for the ages.  Henry’s blog announcement sums up the project and collection nicely.

Listen to the Silence conference, 2013

The University Archives is pleased to showcase the results of ongoing efforts to collect and make available online born-digital materials from Stanford student organizations. The first such collection to be made available via the Stanford Digital Repository is records of the annual "Listen to the Silence" conference organized by the Asian American Students' Association (AASA).<--break->

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