Blogs

Fall foliage with Hoover Tower in background

Library Website goals for October

October 4, 2012

We have an ambitious set of goals for continuing to improve and enrich the library website in October.  These priorities are based on our original project goals and on feedback and suggestions gathered from patrons and staff. Please continue to send us your feedback and encourage others to do so as well.

 Our goals for October 2012 are to:

Benoit Mandelbrot – Manuscripts launches new project October 2012

October 2, 2012
by Glynn Edwards

At the beginning of this year, the papers of Benoit Mandelbrot, the father of fractal geometry, were given to SUL’s Dept. of Special Collections. Funding for the first year has been set to begin processing this complex collection. We are happy to announce that Laura Williams has been hired as the project archivist and Christy Smith as the processing assistant.

Poster for the October 2012 Stanford Presidential Lecture in the Humanities and Arts, by Michael Ignatieff.

Michael Ignatieff Presidential Lecture: "On Partisanship: Enemies and Adversaries in Politics"

October 1, 2012

Michael Ignatieff Presidential Lecture Website

On October 15, 2012, at 6:00 p.m., Michael Ignatieff will give the 2012-2013 Stanford Presidential Lecture in the Humanities and Arts: "On Partisanship: Enemies and Adversaries in Politics."  The lecture will be held in the Stanford Humanities Center.

In preparation for this event, Matthew Marostica, Curator for Political Science and Economics in the Stanford University Libraries, has written an introductory essay about Ignatieff's remarkable work and career, including a rich annotated bibliography and set of excerpts from Ignatieff's writings.

Example of Top Hit for search on "wireless"

September library website update

October 1, 2012

September was a busy month for the library website team. We officially launched the new site on August 28, and have been steadily adding content, features, and functionality since them.  Below is a summary of the Library website work accomplished in September. 

Patron-facing changes and enhancements:

Scripting the Sacred: Medieval Latin Manuscripts

September 26, 2012
by Astrid Johannah Smith

Digital Production Group takes great pride and pleasure in our role supporting the Library's many beautiful and informative exhibitions. The current exhibition is just that, displaying an array of startlingly colorful and detailed medieval manuscripts from the University's collection.

Please read more below, cross-posted from Special Collections.  See also the recent article in the Stanford University News, Medieval exhibition spotlights Stanford Libraries' manuscript collection.

Scripting the Sacred: Medieval Latin Manuscripts

Scripting the Sacred, part one of a two-part exhibition of Western European manuscripts and fragments, showcases the medieval experience of reading. The exhibition will open Monday, September 17, in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda of Green Library, and continue through January 6, 2013.

Studying these texts involved not only the absorption of knowledge, but also practices of interpretation, identification, and devotion. By focusing on the exercise of reading, this exhibition explores "scripting" in diverse forms: scribal activity, scripted performances, and inscribed divine things (res divinae).

Throughout the Middle Ages, the Bible remained the paradigmatic text for reading and studying. The exhibited biblical items highlight different preferences pertaining to legibility. Indeed, scribes designed manuscripts to guide, assist, and sometimes challenge readers, as medieval versions of biblical commentary and patristic works exemplify. The liturgical genres on display contain written and visual markers that instruct readers in the proper performance of the Mass, music, and specific feast days. The text portion of the liturgy helped stage the clergy's ceremonial duties. Liturgical fragments with musical notation assisted ritual actors in the memorization of stylized speech. Both components show how customized manuscripts promoted reading aloud. Miniature prayer books and books of hours demonstrate a late medieval trend toward privatized and personalized lay devotion.

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