Blogs

New Collections Added to Stanford Digital Repository in April 2012

May 14, 2012

In April, approximately 41,000 images representing just over 1,300 items across several collections were accessioned to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR).

  • R. Stuart Hummel collection: ~1,000 items (~ 35,000 images)
  • Stanford Medieval Manuscripts: 280 manuscripts (560 images)
  • Bibliothèque nationale du France: 3 manuscripts ( ~ 1,300 images)
  • Reid Dennis California Lithographs: 47 lithographs (47 images)
  • Archives Parlementaires: 2 books (1,600 images)
  • Special Collections Requests: 19 items (~2,800 images)

While many of these objects are already discoverable via SearchWorks others will get SearchWorks records in the coming months. However, all materials are currently available via the item’s PURL (a persistent URL which ensure that these materials are available from a single URL over the long-term, regardless of changes in file location or application technology).

Request for Comment: IIIF Image API Proposal

May 10, 2012
by Stuart Snydman

The International Image Interoperability Framework (http://lib.stanford.edu/iiif) is an initiative driven by several major research and national libraries to enable the rich and robust delivery of digital images through common interfaces, and to spur the development of open source and commercial software solutions in this space.

The IIIF Working Group invites comment and feedback on a proposed API for the the delivery of images via a standard http request. The full specification can be found at:

http://library.stanford.edu/iiif/image-api

The IIIF Image API specifies a web service that returns an image in response to a standard http or https request. The URL can specify the region, size, rotation, quality characteristics and format of the requested image. A URL can also be constructed to request basic technical information about the image to support client applications.

What has the web redesign project been up to in the past three months?

April 20, 2012
by Stuart Snydman

Between January and March of this year the web redesign project took a small break in full-time engineering to focus attention on design work, bug fixing, user testing, and analyzing user feedback. The outcomes of this work have been positive, as we've learned a great deal from students, faculty and staff about how they would use the new site and whether or not it will help them successfully complete their most important tasks.  Many small and large improvements to librarypreview.stanford.edu have already been made, and continue to be added.

New Collections Added to Stanford Digital Repository in March, 2012

April 13, 2012

In March, approximately 2,100 objects representing three collections were accessioned to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR).

  • R. Stuart Hummel collection: ~ 2,100 items
  • The Life of Saint Catherine, Codex M0381: 1 manuscript
  • Special collection requests: 1 thesis

More details, including links to sample images are listed below.

While many of these objects are already discoverable via SearchWorks others will get SearchWorks records in the coming months. However, all materials are currently available via the item’s PURL (a persistent URL which ensure that these materials are available from a single URL over the long-term, regardless of changes in file location or application technology).

Writing for the web resources

April 12, 2012
by Ray Heigemeir

The Online Experience Group is increasing its focus on enabling content creators to author clear, concise content for the new website. While an exact date is not yet set, technical developments are progressing at a pace that will soon allow content creators to access the site, update existing content and build new pages. In the spirit of laying “fresh eyes” on current content and developing good habits for continual content review and updating, we recommend the following e-resources on writing effective web content.

New Collections Added to Stanford Digital Repository in February, 2012

March 19, 2012

In February approximately 7,000 objects representing six collections were accessioned to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR), bringing the total number of objects in SDR to nearly 250,000.

  1. Buckminster Fuller collection: 5,200 slides
  2. Kitai topographical maps: 1,600 maps
  3. McLaughlin Maps, California as an Island: 114 maps
  4. R. Stuart Hummel collection: 52 items
  5. Eliasaf Robinson collection addendum: 1 gazette
  6. Islamic prayer book, 1228 H: 1 manuscript

More details, including links to sample images are listed below.

Inclusion in the Stanford Digital Repository ensures that these materials are available to researchers and scholars (while upholding appropriate access restrictions), now and in the future through a secure, sustainable stewardship environment.

While many of these objects are already discoverable via SearchWorks others will get SearchWorks records in the coming months. However, all materials are currently available via the item’s PURL (a persistent URL which ensure that these materials are available from a single URL over the long-term, regardless of changes in file location or application technology).

Q&A: finding both sides of an issue

February 23, 2012
by Mr. James R. (Librarian) Jacobs

Question: What are some good resources for researching the pros and cons of a debate topic?

Answer: There are several solid resources that can help you find both sides of an issue. The following guides provide background data and references for more information used in debating many topics:

Indexing MARC records for SearchWorks - navigating Open Source Software

February 16, 2012

The (meta)data underneath SearchWorks is largely based on our MARC records from Symphony. MARC records are exported from Symphony, then slurped up by an application called SolrMarc, which transforms the MARC data into an index for the Solr search engine used by SearchWorks.

SolrMarc is open source software made available by Bob Haschart of the University of Virginia Libraries. SolrMarc is used by all(?) VuFind sites as well as most Blacklight sites built on MARC data (e.g. SearchWorks). SolrMarc has been great for us -- it gave us an enormous jump start for SearchWorks. Bob is also a great guy, and made me a "committer" almost immediately -- so I can make contributions to the open source code.

But.

Open Source Software does best when there is a critical mass of developers: group wisdom rocks, as does sharing the work. To date, SolrMarc is very much Bob's project, despite a number of committers such as myself. There are some ... interesting ... practices as to how SolrMarc is organized and how it is tested. I've even contributed a bit to some of its squirreliness. Occasionally, changes to the SolrMarc codebase break the code I've written especially for Stanford.

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