Blogs

Image of the earth from space

SDR Deposit of the Week: Generation Anthropocene

April 11, 2013
by Amy E. Hodge

An.thro.po.cene: /ˈanTHrəpəˌsēn/ noun  The current geologic age, viewed as the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment. -- Oxford Dictionaries

Great things are going on at the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR), and when great things are going on, word is sure to get around. Earth Sciences PhD student Mike Osborne is the creator and co-producer of Stanford's "Generation Anthropocene" podcast. Mike learned about the SDR's digital preservation services from our colleagues over at HighWire Press and is now working with us to preserve audio and transcripts of the more than 50 "Generation Anthropocene" episodes that have been produced thus far.

Mendeley Workshops in the Huang Center

April 10, 2013

The Terman Engineering Library is offering five Mendeley Workshops during the Spring Term. The first session is Thursday, April 11 from 12noon to 1pm in Huang 219.  All of the sessions will cover how to add, organize, share and cite articles.  Both new and experienced users are welcome to attend.  The workshops are open to all Stanford students, faculty and staff. Sign-up for the workshops on the Science and Engineering Libraries Training site on Coursework.

1989 Big Game program

Archives acquires athletics memorabilia

April 10, 2013
by Daniel Hartwig

The University Archives is pleased to announce a gift of athletics memorabilia from Gordon Ansley, a lifelong supporter and fan of Stanford Athletics. Included are football programs, including many Big Game programs; media guides; scrapbooks; and game ephemera. The gift adds many historic and contemporary items to the Archives' athletics collections.

SDR Deposit of the Week: SUL staff publications

April 9, 2013
by Hannah Frost

In developing the new deposit interface for the Stanford Digital Repository, first and foremost we had in mind the needs of Stanford students, researchers, faculty and the SUL selectors who build collections for their use. So it was a surprising -- and happy -- moment when it became apparent that Stanford library staff have their very own content to archive, too. A collection for gathering SUL staff publications and research has been established for this purpose and is already populated with two exemplars of the leaderful work and innovative ideas produced by our colleagues. 

Gary Snyder visiting Stanford this week

April 9, 2013

The well-known poet, essayist, and environmental activist Gary Snyder will be speaking on Wednesday at noon in the Terrace Room, Building 460 (Margaret Jacks Hall), and giving a reading and talk Thursday evening at 6:15 in Room 105 of Building 320 (Geology Corner). He is often described as the "poet laureate of Deep Ecology," and has been linked with the Beat Generation and the San Francisco Renaissance.

Writing in Books

April 5, 2013
by Elizabeth A Fischbach

A new exhibition in Stanford’s Green Library, co-curated by Stanford Ph.D. candidate in history Hannah Marcus and Curator of Rare Books John Mustain, explores the phenomenon of writing in books from multiple perspectives. Through examples of early print and manuscript hybrids, scholarly annotation, dialogue in the margins, censorship, the use of blank pages and margins for incidental storage, and writers editing their own work post-publication, the exhibit considers the ways in which print and manuscript notation exist symbiotically in books to the benefit of historians and other scholars.

The Dichterliebe, recorded by Thom Denijs in 1928 (HMV 092026)

Spotlight on: Schumann's Dichterliebe

April 4, 2013
by Jerry L McBride

Schumann’s Dichterliebe, op. 48, from 1840 weds music and text into one of the most memorable song cycles of the Romantic period. The cycle consists of sixteen songs on poems from Heinrich Heine’s Lyrisches Intermezzo. The earliest recordings of the entire cycle were by Dutch baritone, Thom Denijs (1877-1935), who recorded the cycle twice in London with his wife, Emmy Denijs-Kruyt (1878-1964), as pianist, first in an acoustic recording on 5 April 1923 and later as an electrical recording in three sessions in January and July 1928.

Pages

accessibilityaccessprivsarrow-circle-rightaskus-chataskus-librarianbarsblogsclosecoffeecomputercomputersulcontactsconversationcopierelectricaloutleteventsexternal-linkfacebook-circlegroupstudyhoursindividualinterlibrarynewsnextoffcampusopenlateoutdoorpeoplepolicypreviousprinterprojectsquietreservesscannersearchstudysupportingtabletourstwitter-circleworking