Blogs

Stanford Open Policing Project Website

SDR deposit of the week: the Stanford Open Policing Project

On June 19th 2017, the Stanford Open Policing Project launched its website to provide access to the data collected about police stops around the country and to provide information about research that this data is driving. Stanford Libraries is pleased to be a partner in the long-term preservation of this data, which has been deposited into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR).

Rare music materials on display

Summer students encounter rare music

June 28, 2017
by Ray Heigemeir

It was my distinct pleasure to offer a window into Stanford Libraries’ rare music collections to students in the “Why Music Matters” course from the Stanford Pre-Collegiate Summer Institute, and performers in the St. Lawrence String Quartet’s Chamber Music Course.  We gathered in Special Collections for an up-close examination of manuscripts and early print materials, dating from 1942 (Irving Berlin’s White Christmas) all the way back to the 12th century (a sacred chant fragment).

Acquisitions open house, Wednesday July 12th

June 28, 2017
by Alexis C Manheim

Mark your calendars! The Acquisitions Department invites all library staff to an Open House on Wednesday, July 12th from 10am to noon.

Please join us on the 4th floor of Lathrop Library for workflow demos by our staff, Q&A, and snacks. Our hope is to demystify many of our processes for ordering, receiving, and activating the library’s print and electronic resources.

A detailed schedule and additional information will be sent out closer to the day of the event.

Hope to see you on the 12th!

Tchaikovsky piano concerto no. 1, complete works edition

Composers and their works

June 23, 2017
by Ray Heigemeir

The scholarly edition of the famous Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto no. 1 just landed in my lap (ouch!), which got me thinking about the impressive publications we in the music world know as “composer complete works editions,” or, “composer collected works.” These often lavish, multi-volume sets of music scores are painstakingly produced by scholars, based on all available source material, and published over time following a pre-determined order, and as the name implies, present the complete output of a particular composer.

A False Color 432 Landsat composite image, made in Google Earth Engine

Google makes 40 years of Earth observations available to researchers with Google Earth Engine!

June 21, 2017
by Mr. Stace D Maples

Last week I spent 3 days at Google for their annual Google Earth Engine Summit, learning about new features and applications of their Google Earth Engine technology. If you haven’t seen Google Earth Engine, I encourage you to go to https://earthengine.google.com and use the signup link to get an account. It’s absolutely free for non-commercial use and it’s capabilities are pretty mind-blowing.

Concierge Keys

Reminder: Upcoming Concierge Tours

June 21, 2017
by Huey-Ning Tan

Concierge tours of Li Ma Science Library and the Digitization Lab & Imaging Space take place this week and next.  While the tours of the Digitization Lab have reached capacity, there's still room in the Li Ma Science Library tours.

Li Ma Science Library tours:

  • Wednesday, June 21, 10:00-11:00AM
  • Thursday, June 22, 2:00-3:00PM

Tours will meet at the entrance to the Sapp Center for Science Teaching and Learning.

Becky Fischbach and Tom Mullaney

Tom Mullaney & Becky Fischbach: remarks at the 2017 Amy J. Blue Awards ceremony

June 14, 2017
by Glen Worthey

On May 24, 2017, Stanford Libraries staff member Becky Fischbach was awarded the University's Amy J. Blue Award.  Becky and her award were profiled by the University News Service a week earlier ("Elizabeth Fischbach, a ‘storyteller par excellence,’ wins an Amy J. Blue Award").  Below are remarks offered at the awards ceremony by Stanford Professor of History Tom Mullaney, who introduced Becky, and by the laureate herself in accepting the award.  Photos of the event are courtesy of Katie Farrey.

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