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Patents

Last Updated: 11-May-2016

Resources to help you understand, search, and access patents. 

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Grace Baysinger
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Need the full-text for a patent?

Google patent search:  familiar interface; full-text search back to US patent #1; includes US, EP and WIPO patents BUT OCR errors may cause incomplete results; can be slow to update most recent patents.

USPTO Patent Office search: includes the most current US patents; has some good searching tools, such as patent class codes; BUT full-text only since 1976; not as user friendly as Google.

Espacenet offers free access to more than 80 million patent documents worldwide, most of them patent applications rather than granted patents, from 1836 to today.

For really advanced help you can also contact one of the three US Patent and Trademark Resource Centers in the Bay area.  San Francisco, San Jose, Sunnyvale.

Key databases

[Philadelphia] : Institute for Scientific Informtion, [1999?]-
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
"Using information from 41 patent-issuing authorities, DII facilitates rapid, precise patent searching, letting you conduct patent and citation searches of inventions in chemical, electrical, electronic, and mechanical engineering. Descriptive titles and indexing have been added. Find “equivalent” patents published in a language you can read. Also contains both citing and cited patents and literature references, allowing users to move both forward and backward in time from a selected patent. Updated weekly, covers 1963-present." (Structure Searching)
[Place of publication not identified] : European Patent Office.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
"Espacenet's worldwide database enables you to search for information about published patent applications from over 90 different countries and regions. Espacenet offers free access to more than 80 million patent documents worldwide--most of them patent applications rather than granted patents--from 1836 to today. Patent applications normally represent the first publication of a new idea, appearing ahead of journal articles and before new products reach the market. It is possible to print and download full-text documents."
The Lens - Open Public Resource for Innovation Cartography
Brisbane, Australia : Cambia.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Funded initially by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The Lens now covers nearly 90 jurisdictions worldwide with over 80 million patent documents, serving INPADOC, EPO, USPTO, and WO, with many more coming.  Explore global patent families; full-text searching of major jurisdictions (US, EP, WO); free PDFs; multilingual searching (English, Chinese, French, Spanish, German, Korean, Japanese, Russian); collect, share, comment, annotate; faceted exploration; graphical analysis; embed analysis in your site; explore over 120 million DNA and 10 million protein sequences in patents; marked up citations (links to references and open access documents); current legal status; and examine and compare biological holdings using the PatSeq Explorer

Patent news

EPO President's Blog and EPO news

The European Patent Office (EPO) President shares his thoughts on current issues.  Please also see patenting issues and press releases for information on patenting and IP issues that are making the news.

VentureBeat: Tech news that matters

Founded in 2006, VentureBeat is the leading source for news and perspective on technology innovation.

Sorry, there was an error with the RSS feed.

Keeping lab records

Data management services @ Stanford

Data Management "The main goal of Data Management Services is to assist Stanford University's researchers with the organization, management, and curation of research data in order to enhance its preservation and access now and into the future. This site will help you create and carry out a data management strategy that will preserve your valuable research data for future sharing and reuse."

Selected links

Selected books

Writing the laboratory notebook
Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society, 1985.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) » Stacks » Q180.58 .K36 1985
Discussing the vital aspects of how to make a proper and permanent record of research work, this work goes beyond the mechanical of simply filling in the notebook pages with details on the skills needed to create proper records of research, observations, and results. It helps to increase awareness of what is being done in the lab, and to develop a flexible style of notekeeping that will serve a variety of research environments.
Reworking the bench : research notebooks in the history of science
Dordrecht ; Boston ; London : Kluwer Academic Publishers, c2003.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) » Stacks » Q225.5 .R475 2003
Research records composed of notes and protocols have long played a role in the efforts to understand the origins of what have come to be seen as the established milestones in the development of modern science. The use of research records to probe the nature of scientific investigation itself however is a recent development in the history of science.

About patents

Nolo Patents for Beginners
7th ed. [Berkeley, CA] : Nolo, 2012.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) » Stacks » KF3114.85 .P737 2012
Offers an introduction to the patenting process, including information on invention documentation, patent searching, and patent infringement.
Patent fundamentals for scientists and engineers
3rd ed. Boca Raton, Fla. : CRC Press, 2013.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
"Ideal for anyone without prior legal knowledge who needs to understand the patent system, this book enables nonspecialists to make well-informed decisions affecting new and patentable products. The third edition covers the new patent law, the America Invents Act, which was recently passed by Congress and signed by the President.

What is a patent?

"A patent is an intellectual property right granted by the Government of the United States of America to an inventor “to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling the invention throughout the United States or importing the invention into the United States” for a limited time [usually 20 years] in exchange for public disclosure of the invention when the patent is granted.

There are three types of patents.

  • Utility patents may be granted to anyone who invents or discovers any new and useful process, machine, article of manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof.
  • Design patents may be granted to anyone who invents a new, original, and ornamental design for an article of manufacture.
  • Plant patents may be granted to anyone who invents or discovers and asexually reproduces any distinct and new variety of plant."

Source: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office > Patents

Selected books on patents in the Stanford Libraries

he chemist's companion guide to patent law
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley, c2010.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Written by an individual with experience as both a chemist and a patent attorney, The Chemist's Companion Guide to Patent Law covers everything the student or working chemist needs to know about patentability, explaining important concepts of patent law (such as novelty, non-obviousness, and freedom-to-operate) in easy-to-understand terms. Through abundant examples from case law as well as real-world situations with which a researcher might be faced, this book provides readers with a better understanding of how to put that knowledge into practice.
First to file : patents for today's scientist and engineer
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Bridges the gap between the realistic needs and questions of scientists and engineers and the legal skills of professionals in the patent field at a level accessible to those with no legal training.  This book was written for inventors in lay terms that they can relate to or easily follow.  It lays out the new features of patent law introduced by the America Invents Act of 2012 and explains the differences between the first-to-invent and first-to-file rules and why the two rules will coexist.  It also focuses on the growth of new technologies in industry versus the laws protecting them.
How to invent and protect your invention
Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c2012.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Although chemists, physicists, biologists, polymer scientists, and engineers in industry are involved in potentially patentable work, they are often under-prepared for this all-important field. This book provides a clear, jargon-free, and comprehensive overview of the patenting process tailored specifically to the needs of scientists and engineers, including: requirements for a patentable invention, how to invent, new laws created by President Obama's 2011 America Invents Act, the process of applying for and obtaining a patent in the U.S. and in foreign countries, and commercializing inventions and the importance of innovation.  Based on lecture notes refined over twenty-five years at The University of Akron, How to Invent and Protect Your Invention contains practical advice, colorful examples, and a wealth of personal experience from the authors.
 Intellectual property law for engineers and scientists
Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley-Interscience : IEEE Press, c2004.
SAL3 (off-campus storage) » Stacks » KF2979 .R63 2004
An excellent text for researchers to read in order to understand the fundamentals of patent, copyright, trade secret, trademark, mask work, and unfair competition laws.
Intellectual property : patents, trademarks, and copyright in a nutshell
5th ed. St. Paul, MN : West, c2012.
Law Library (Crown) » Stacks 2 » KF2980 .M52 2012
Authors Michael Davis and famed Harvard professor Arthur Miller provide authoritative coverage on the foundations of patent protection, patentability, and the patenting process. Presents the fundamentals of trademarks and copyright laws. Text further addresses torts and property, antitrust and government regulation, concepts of federalism and state, and federal conflicts.
Manual of patent examining procedure
Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Patent and Trademark Office,
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
This Manual is published to provide U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) patent examiners, applicants, attorneys, agents, and representatives of applicants with a reference work on the practices and procedures relative to the prosecution of patent applications before the USPTO. It contains instructions to examiners, as well as other material in the nature of information and interpretation, and outlines the current procedures which the examiners are required or authorized to follow in appropriate cases in the normal examination of a patent application.
Patent strategy for researchers and research managers
3rd ed. Chichester : John Wiley & Sons, 2013.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) » Stacks » KF3120 .Z9 K58 2013
Patent Strategy introduces researchers to patent applications and patent portfolios. With minimum use of ‘legal jargon’ it provides the technical professional with the assistance and advice they require to understand the legal complexities that they may encounter before and during a patent application.  This updated edition of the best selling book has been expanded to keep pace with modern day movements and addresses the global issue surrounding intellectual property. Including new information on areas such as software and biotechnology it shows the techniques that can be used by individuals and academic inventors to protect their work and is the ideal reference source.
Patents for chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and biotechnology : fundamentals of global law, practice, and strategy
5th ed. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press ; 2010.
Law Library (Crown) » Basement » K1505 .G78 2010
The chemicals, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology industries worldwide rely upon being able to patent inventions in order to protect investment in research and development, and to reap commercial rewards. An increasingly globalized sector requires a global perspective, and this book guides the reader through the legal and procedural complexities of the British, European, Japanese and US patent systems.  This book provides the reader with a complete description of the techniques and industry know-how that underlie successful patent practice and portfolio management and will be invaluable to all patent agents and practitioners working in the area of patent law. With its lucid and accessible presentation and practical approach, this book will also be welcomed by scientists, researchers and managers without a legal background.
Understanding patents
2nd ed. Washington, DC : American Chemical Society, 1991.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) » Stacks » T211 .M39 1991
"Gives a description of the U.S. patent system and a tutorial on how to read and understand patents, how to use patents as a source of information, how to recognize that an invention has been made, and how to work with attorneys or agents in seeeking patent protection for inventions. Also gives the technical person enough familiarity with the special terminology of patents to be able to deal comfortably with patent attorneys, agents, and technical liaison personnel. Answers the questions not only of practicing chemists and chemical engineers, but also people in other fields who need to understand the patent system."
Writing chemistry patents and intellectual property: a practical guide
Hoboken : Wiley, c2011.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
A practical handbook designed to empower inventors like you to write your own patent application drafts in conjunction with an attorney,this book presents a brand new methodology for success. Based on a short course author Francis J. Waller gives for the American Chemical Society, the book teaches you how to structure a literature search, to educate the patent examiner on your work, to prepare an application that can be easily duplicated, and to understand what goes on behind the scenes during the patent examiner's rejection process. Providing essential insights, invaluable strategies, and applicable, real-world examples designed to maximize the chances that a patent will be accepted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office, Writing Chemistry Patents and Intellectual Property is the book you need if you want to keep your work protected.

Patent classification

Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC)

The Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC) is an extension of the IPC and is jointly managed by the EPO and the US Patent and Trademark Office. It is divided into nine sections, A-H and Y, which in turn are sub-divided into classes, sub-classes, groups and sub-groups. There are approximately 250 000 classification entries.  By EPOfilms.

Patent databases

International patent databases

[Philadelphia] : Institute for Scientific Informtion, [1999?]-
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
"Using information from 41 patent-issuing authorities, DII facilitates rapid, precise patent searching, letting you conduct patent and citation searches of inventions in chemical, electrical, electronic, and mechanical engineering. Descriptive titles and indexing have been added. Find “equivalent” patents published in a language you can read. Also contains both citing and cited patents and literature references, allowing users to move both forward and backward in time from a selected patent. Updated weekly, covers 1963-present." (Structure Searching)
Designview
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Designview is an online consultation tool allowing any Internet user to search, free of charge, designs of all participating offices, including OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market of the European Union), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and National Offices. It is multilingual and easy-to-use tool, and gives access to design applications and registrations provided by the participating offices though a single and unique platform. Each office owns the content it makes available and is responsible for its daily update.
[Place of publication not identified] : European Patent Office.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
"Espacenet's worldwide database enables you to search for information about published patent applications from over 90 different countries and regions. Espacenet offers free access to more than 80 million patent documents worldwide--most of them patent applications rather than granted patents--from 1836 to today. Patent applications normally represent the first publication of a new idea, appearing ahead of journal articles and before new products reach the market. It is possible to print and download full-text documents."
Google patents search beta logo - 50 percent size and rotated
Beta. [Mountain View, Calif. : Google, 2006-]
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Google Patents covers the entire collection of granted patents and published patent applications from the USPTO (United States), the EPO (Europe), the DPMA (Germany), the CIPO (Canada), the SIPO (China) and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). US patent documents date back to 1790, EPO and WIPO to 1978.  Each patent search includes the patent summary, claims, drawings, citations, and referenced by notes. Offers full-text searching, relevancy ranked sorting of search results, and access to PDFs of original documents.  Checking the "include non-patent literature" box allows your search to also find books, articles and reports with the matching CPC codes for your searched topic from Google Scholar.
The Lens - Open Public Resource for Innovation Cartography
Brisbane, Australia : Cambia.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Funded initially by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The Lens now covers nearly 90 jurisdictions worldwide with over 80 million patent documents, serving INPADOC, EPO, USPTO, and WO, with many more coming.  Explore global patent families; full-text searching of major jurisdictions (US, EP, WO); free PDFs; multilingual searching (English, Chinese, French, Spanish, German, Korean, Japanese, Russian); collect, share, comment, annotate; faceted exploration; graphical analysis; embed analysis in your site; explore over 120 million DNA and 10 million protein sequences in patents; marked up citations (links to references and open access documents); current legal status; and examine and compare biological holdings using the PatSeq Explorer
WIPO - Patentscope
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Using PATENTSCOPE you can search 43 million patent documents including 2.5 million published international patent applications. Provided by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), gives you access to millions of patent documents, namely: International Patent applications filed under the PCT (Patent Cooperation Treaty), and regional and national patent collections from participating countries and organizations.

USPTO Global Dossier

USPTO Global Dossier allows users to track the status of patents in the world’s five largest patent offices: the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, the European Patent Office, the Korean Intellectual Property Office, China’s State Intellectual Property Office and the Japan Patent Office.  As users search for the status of an invention's applications, the Dossier Access portal queries foreign patent office databases in real time. It also offers translations of non-English applications.

U.S. patent databases

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Official Seal
Washington, DC : U.S. Dept. of Commerce, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Information Products Division,
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Published weekly on Tuesday, includes bibliographic information and a representative drawing for each patent granted or trademark published on that issue date.  There is a separate Official Gazette for Patents and Official Gazette for Trademarks, and the most recent 52 issues for each are available online.   Print copies of the Official Gazette are also available in the Stanford Libraries: Official Gazette 1872-1971, Official Gazette 1971-1975, and Official Gazette 1975-2002.
Lightbulb
[Washington, D.C.?] : US Patent and Trademark Office.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
This page is the starting point for the USPTO's free patent databases covering patent grants (full-text since 1976, full-page images since 1790), and patent applications (published since 15 March 2001). Patents issued between 1790 and 1976 are searchable only by patent number and current U.S. classification. Patents issued after 1976 may be searched by any keyword.

Canadian patent database

Canadian patent database
[Ottawa] : Canadian Intellectual Property Office, 1998-
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
The Canadian Patent Database contains over 2.2 million patent documents from 1869 to the present. This database is updated regularly with newly granted patents and applications opened to public inspection. Searches are performed against the bibliographic and text data fields only, and a "hit list" of matching patents is returned. Images are not searchable but can be viewed for any particular patent that has been returned in a hit list. The text of the abstracts and claims is not available for patents that were granted prior to August 15, 1978. These patents can only be searched by their patent number, titles, owner, inventor, or classification. Note about completeness of the Date Fields: The issue date is searchable from 1869 to the last updated date. The filing date is not available for patents registered prior to August 15, 1978. The priority date and the national entry date are not available for patents registered prior to October 1, 1989.

Japanese patent database

Search in English or Japanese.

Japan Platform for Patent Information (J-PlatPat) offers the public access to IP Gazettes of the JPO free of charge through the Internet. Offers searches for Patent & utility model number, FI/F-term, PAJ, Patent map guidance, design number, design classification, and Japanese trademarks. 
  1. J-PlatPat enables users to access to almost all official gazettes which have been issued by Japan Patent Office.  Keyword search in English is available in the Patent Abstracts of Japan which abstracts of published patent applications that have been issued after 1976.)
  2. J-PlatPat enables users to search official gazettes which have been issued since 1885 by patent classification (FI or F-term).  What’s FI ? FI is a classification which is given by JPO to make prior art searches more efficient. The IPC is subdivided or expanded into the FI.  What’s F-term ? F-term is the technical term made from multiple viewpoints for computerized retrieval of the patent documents, which is given to the patent documents by JPO.
  3. For further information on FI or F-term, you can use PMGS (Patent Map Guidance System). By using “keyword search”, you can reach to suitable FI or F-term.
  4. J-PlatPat enables users to access to English version (machine translation) of patent, utility model gazette which has been issued since 1993 and design official gazette which has been issued since 2000.
 

People's Republic of China patent database

Search in English or Chinese.

SIPO State Intellectual Property Office of the People’s Republic of China - 65 percent size
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
As a result of cooperative effort between the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and State Intellectual Property Office (SIPO) of the People's Republic of China, Chinese patent documentation is now available for search and retrieval from the USPTO website via the Global Patent Search Network. This tool will enable the user to search Chinese patent documents in the English or Chinese language. The data available include fulltext Chinese patents and machine translations. Also available are full document images of Chinese patents which are considered the authoritative Chinese patent document. Users can search documents including published applications, granted patents and utility models from 1985 to 2012. This collection will be periodically updated to include additional years of coverage.

Subject databases

The databases below include patents that fit within their scope of coverage.

[New York?] : Thomson Reuters.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Biosis is a comprehensive source for life sciences and biomedical research from nearly 6,000 life sciences journals plus abstracts from meetings, books and patents. Search options include using taxonomy, MeSH, CAS registry numbers, Sequence Databank Numbers, and Major Concepts. Updated weekly, covers 1926--present. Cited reference searching finds more recent works that cite an earlier document of interest
Engineering Village
Hoboken, N.J. : Elsevier Engineering Information, Inc.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Engineering Village is an information discovery platform that includes access to two databases at Stanford. Compendex (Computerized Engineering Index) is the most comprehensive bibliographic database of scientific and technical engineering research available, covering all engineering disciplines. It includes millions of bibliographic citations and abstracts from thousands of engineering journals and conference proceedings. When combined with the Engineering Index Backfile (1884-1969), Compendex covers well over 120 years of core engineering literature.
Inspec
[United States] : Institution of Electrical Engineers, INSPEC service, [19--]-
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Provides a comprehensive index to the published literature in physics, electrical/electronic engineering, computing, control engineering, information technology, production, manufacturing and mechanical engineering as well as materials science, oceanography, nuclear engineering, geophysics, biomedical engineering and biophysics. Coverage begins in 1898.
Lexis nexis academic
[Miamisburg, OH] : LexisNexis, division of Reed Elsevier
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Provides access to various databases, including current news, business information, company directories, federal and state laws, regulations, legal cases, medical and references.  Includes full-text of U.S. Patents from mid-1970's, patent case law and administrative decisions, patent statutory and regulatory materials, and patent news and publications.  Search by Content Type and choose Patents.
Rahway, N.J. : Merck & Co., 1968-
Green Library » Information Center: Reference » RS356 .M524 2001
The Merck Index contains over 10,000 monographs with information relating to compounds of significance in research, commerce and environmental impact.  Each monograph in this authoritative reference source is a concise description of a single substance or a small group of closely related compounds. There is also a supplement of Organic Name Reactions.
Pharmaceutical Substances
Stuttgart ; New York : Thieme Chemistry, 2003-
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Version 3.8 features 32 new APIs and a total of 35,358 structures, 11,289 reactions and 2,606 active pharmaceutical ingredients.  Essential for research and process chemists, it includes the full synthetic route for the industrial manufacture of each drug elucidated from the patent literature; unique source of reactions that perform on an industrial scale; readily available overview of the pharmaceutical industry from a synthetic chemist’s perspective; and functionality affords insights into a therapeutic area and chemically related substances. Essential information for product managers, it includes patent information including approval date and expiration; determine market size & competition for an API – essential for development of new and generic pharmaceuticals; source of markets for synthesis intermediates; comprehensive coverage of older APIs and substances approved world-wide; and merger and acquisition tracking ensures that vendor information is up-to-date in a rapidly changing industry.  (Structure Searching)
[Frankfurt, Germany ; New York, NY] : Elsevier
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Available via the web, Reaxys Xcelerate contains an extensive repository of experimentally validated data that chemists need including structures, reactions (including multi-step reactions) and physical properties. Reaxys was formed by the merger of three databases: Beilstein Handbook of Organic Chemistry, Gmelin Handbook of Inorganic and Organometallic Chemistry, and the Chemistry Patent database. (Structure and Reaction Searching)
[Columbus, Ohio : American Chemical Society, Chemical Abstracts Service]
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
SciFinder is the most comprehensive database for coverage of chemistry & chemical engineering. It has the world's largest collection of organic and inorganic substance information. The web version of SciFinder provides integrated access to CAPlus, CAS Registry, CASREACT, CHEMLIST, and CHEMCATS which are produced by Chemical Abstracts Service, and to MEDLINE which is produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Sources covered in SciFinder include 10,000 journals, patents from 63 patent authorities, book chapters, conference proceedings, dissertations, evaluated reference works, technical reports, as well as book reviews and biographical information. (Structure and Reaction Searching)
[New York] : Elsevier, 2004-
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
"Updated daily, Scopus is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature. It also includes web sources, patents, articles in-press, book series, conference proceedings, and trade publications. Scopus provides international coverage of literature in science, technology, and medicine, and social sciences plus related content in the arts and humanities. 1996-present plus selected coverage back to 1823."

Scopus offers a patent search of over 24 million records from WIPO, EPO, USPTO, JPO and the UK.  Do your search and after you have results, look for "view patents results" above the search result list.  When you select it, Scopus will open another window with only the patents.  A partial preview of the abstract is available by mousing over the patent title.  Links will take you from Scopus to the patent repository where the full text can be downloaded.

Patent offices

Silicon Valley Office

San Jose City Hall

Permanent Silicon Valley Office will open in San Jose City Hall in early 2015

 The San Jose City Hall will be home to the United States Patent and Trademark Office’s (USPTO) Silicon Valley office in mid-2015 after renovations and technical infrastructure updates are completed to accommodate USPTO business.  This landmark building, built in 2005, reflects the city's stature in the valley and stands as a symbol of the area's cultural roots and technological savvy.  The Silicon Valley, known as one of the most prodigious and innovative entrepreneurial communities in the country, was selected as our west coast presence to assist the USPTO in fostering and protecting innovation. 

Patent searching

Patent Searching: Tools and Techniques
Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c2007.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) » Reference » T210 .H86 2007
Whether you're a patent examiner, patent attorney, commercial patent searcher, patent liaison, IP librarian, law professor, or competitive intelligence analyst, you'll find Patent Searching: Tools and Techniques to be just the guide you have been waiting for, with a range of approaches to patent searching that will be useful to you regardless of your technical expertise or role in the intellectual property community.

Books for patent searchers

Chemical information for chemists: a primer
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) » Stacks » QD8.5 .C474 2014
"While it is not difficult to find data in many cases, what advice can you get on the quality of the data retrieved? Chemical Information for Chemists could help with this problem and more. This book is a chemical information book aimed specifically at practicing chemists. Written and edited by experts in the field, it is ideal for chemists who lack a chemical information professional able to teach basic and intermediate techniques in retrieving and evaluating information using the unique entry points of the chemical literature, including structure, formula, substructure, and sequence. Aimed at students on undergraduate and graduate courses, it could also be a useful guide to new information specialists who are facing the challenging diversity of chemical literature." (publisher's description)
Information Sources in Patents
3rd completely rev. ed. Berlin ; Boston : De Gruyter Saur, c2012.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) » Reference » T210 .I53 2012
This completely revised edition takes account of the changing information scene e.g. in new chapters like BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), Asia and regional patent systems or Sources for legal status searching. This is an essential reference tool for academic librarians and information specialists as well as anyone needing to know where and how patent information can be found.

Resources for advanced users

Current challenges in patent information retrieval
Berlin ; Heidelberg ; New York : Springer, c2011.
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
Patents form an important knowledge resource –much technical information represented in patents is not represented in scientific literature – and at the same time they are important, and economically highly relevant, legal documents. Between 1998 and 2008, the number of patent applications filed yearly worldwide grew by more than 50 percent.This book offers a comprehensive overview on the quickly growing domain of patent retrieval.  Jointly written by members of the information retrieval and patent information communities, Combines scientific rigorous results with industrial application requirements.

Inventors & Inventions

You don't have to be a mechanical genius to be an inventor. Anyone can invent - a parent wrestling with a baby sling ...a coach frustrated with slick-soled running shoes ...an office worker determined to keep the computer cords untangled. Inventing is simply finding clever solutions to everyday challenges. Author and inventor Patricia Nolan-Brown has turned common annoyances into ingenious and money-making products. She shares the tricks of her trade in Idea to Invention, a practical guide that helps ordinary people look at their world with the eyes of an inventor.
Makers at Work
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
What do you get when you combine an electronics hobbyist, hacker, garage mechanic, kitchen table inventor, tinkerer, and entrepreneur? A maker, of course. Playful and creative, makers are through expertise and experimentation creating art, products, and processes that change the way we think and interact with the world.
Patents Ingenious Inventions
New York : Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, c2004.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain) » Stacks » T47 .I44 2004
This book is covered in bubble wrap, one of man's more ingenious creations. It includes dozens of notable patents, from the airplane, brassiere, chain saw, and fire hydrant to the Internet, parachute, plunger, and zipper. The purpose of each device is explained in accessible language, along with background about the inventor, interesting sidebars and history, and an excerpt from the original patent application. The artwork throughout includes photos of original models and patent diagrams created by the inventors themselves, annotated to show exactly how each item works.

What is an invention?

"An invention is a novel and useful idea relating to processes, machines, manufactures, and compositions of matter. It may cover such things as new or improved devices, systems, circuits, chemical compounds, mixtures, etc. It is probable that an invention has been made when something new and useful has been conceived or developed, or when unusual, unexpected, or nonobvious results have been obtained and can be exploited. 

An invention can be made solely or jointly with others as coinventors. To be recognized legally, a coinventor must have conceived of an essential element of an invention or contributed substantially to the general concept. 

An invention, although unpatentable for various reasons, may still be valuable and important - for example, trade secrets and technical "know-how" encompassing proprietary information of a valuable and confidential nature. 

Agencies sponsoring research at Stanford usually require reports of all inventions, whether or not they are considered patentable."

Source: Stanford University - DoResearch - Intellectual Property - Inventions, Patents, and Licensing 9.1, Parts 4B, 4D.

The printing press

Printing press from 1811, exhibited in Munich, Germany.  "The 15th-century invention of the printing press with movable type by the German Johannes Gutenberg is widely regarded as the most influential event of the modern era.Source: Wikipedia - Timeline of historic inventions.

New books on Inventors in the Stanford Libraries

  1. FilmBuff presents in association with Artemis Rising, an Invented By Girls production ; directed by Lesley Chilcott ; produced by Tracey Karka, Tiffany Haynes, Lesley Chilcott. 2016

  2. Pagan Kennedy. 2016

  3. Jonathan Keats. 2016

New books on Inventions in the Stanford Libraries

Innovation

VentureBeat: Tech news that matters

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Featured books

Design thinking research : building innovation eco-systems
Cham ; New York : Springer, c2014.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving) » Stacks » T49.5 .D45 2014
This book summarizes the results of Design Thinking Research carried out at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, USA, and Hasso Plattner Institute in Potsdam, Germany.  The authors offer readers a closer look at Design Thinking with its processes of innovations and methods. The contents of the articles range from how to design ideas, methods, and technologies via creativity experiments and wicked problem solutions, to creative collaboration in the real world and the connectivity of designers and engineers.  The authors show how these methods and strategies work in companies, introduce new technologies and their functions and demonstrate how Design Thinking can influence as diverse a topic area as marriage.
It is becoming increasingly obvious that the United States needs reliable and inexpensive energy to propel our economy and protect our national security interests. Game Changers presents five research and development efforts from American universities that offer a cheaper, cleaner, and more secure national energy system. Drawing from the efforts of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI) and other leading university research centers, the book describes some of the energy innovations that will transform our future: natural gas from shales, solar photovoltaics, grid-scale electricity storage, electric cars, and LED lighting. For each of these innovations, the authors detail what is available today, what is near at hand, and what is on the horizon. In addition, they show how extreme energy reliability and performance demands put the United States military at the leading edge of driving energy innovations, and survey potentially game-changing energy technologies currently being put into use by the U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force, on base and in forward deployment. The more choices our laboratories put on the table, the less constrained we are in using them to reach the things we really care about—health, family, business, culture, faith, and delight. This is what game changers are ultimately about.
Global Innovation Science Handbook
New York : McGraw-Hill, [2014]
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
This pioneering work is based on a defined body of knowledge that includes intent, methodology, tools, and measurements. It challenges the popular paradigm that "learned" innovation is impossible, and lays out a systematic process for developing innovation skills. Each chapter can be independently read and utilized in the daily practice of innovation. Real world case studies from financial, governmental and educational sectors illustrate the concepts discussed in this definitive resource.
Innovation and development around the world, 1960-2000
[Washington, D.C. : World Bank, 2005]
Stanford University Libraries » Online resource » eResource
The authors present a database of indicators of innovative activity around the world since the early 1960s. The data include measures of innovation outcomes as well as variables related to innovation effort. The main indicator of innovation outputs is patents. The main variables related to innovation inputs are investment in research and development (R&D) and technical personnel (engineers, scientists) working in R&D activities.

Library materials covering economic aspects of technological innovations

Technology transfer

Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing - Innovation Inspiration

The Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing was established in 1970 to transfer technologies developed at Stanford.  Video about Stanford's OTL including interviews with inventors and technology transfer professionals. Conversations on the unique environment and interactions here promoting the transfer of great ideas from the laboratories to industry where they can be developed into useful products.

Library materials on "Academic-industrial collaboration"

  1. Marina Dabić, Jadranka Švarc, and Miguel González-Loureiro. 2016

  2. Antoine van Agtmael and Fred Bakker. 2016

  3. David Audretsch, Erik Lehmann, Michele Meoli, Silvio Vismara, editors. 2016