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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Painted Green Library Bing Wing stairwell leading up to the David Rumsey Map Center.

"One of the World's Great Map Collections," a quote taken in part from the title of an article published by National Geographic on the newly opened David Rumsey Map Center.

"The new David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford University feels like a secret clubhouse for map lovers. To get there, you pass through a nondescript door in the library and climb two flights of stairs. But it’s not just any stairwell: The walls are painted floor to ceiling with colorful maps.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Kären Wigen - Frances and Charles Field Professor in History

Stanford faculty provide insight into the great value, purpose, and impact the David Rumsey Map Center will have on the Stanford community and around the world.

Kären Wigen - Frances and Charles Field Professor in History
David Rumsey’s remarkable map collection will be a very visible jewel in the Stanford Libraries’ crown. An archive of this scope, caliber, and renown is a rare windfall for any university’s special collections. Read more...

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

The David Rumsey Map Center is a unique collections-based resource designed to provide access to cartographic information in all of its forms from paper to digital. In addition to housing a large collection of rare atlases and maps, it is furnished with high-resolution screens equipped with interactive tools for engaging with the digital images.

When: April 19 -22, 2016
Where: Green Library, Bing Wing, 4th Floor
Admission: This event is free and open to the public.

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Jordan Archives Bolster and Expand the Jack H. Lee and Arden T. Lee Baha'i Collection at Stanford Libraries

By guest authors Deanne LaRue and David Langness

On 18 February 2016 the Stanford Libraries received the archives that contain the life’s work of educator, psychologist and philosopher Daniel C. Jordan, the creator of the Anisa Educational Model.

Delivered personally by Dr. Jordan’s widow, Nancy Jordan, and his educational collaborator, Donald Streets, the archives and materials contain more than a thousand documents, tapes, files and films spanning Jordan’s remarkable career in education, philosophy, human development, music and psychology. The archives include Jordan’s early work on the holistic, Baha'i-inspired Anisa Educational Project; his personal correspondence with major historical figures like the psychologist and writer Carl Jung; and his doctoral work at the University of Chicago in human development, social anthropology and psychology, for which he wrote and directed a ballet accompanied by musical score and scenario.

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