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Tuesday, October 28, 2014

SLAC physicist Paul Kunz in 1998 with the first U.S. Web server, a NeXT computer.
by Gabrielle Karampelas

Stanford, Calif.—Some of the earliest pages from the World Wide Web have been restored and are once again browsable, providing a glimpse of how the Web once operated. Stanford Libraries has made these pages available with Stanford Wayback, a customized version of an open source platform that enables long-term access to archived web assets.

The first website featured in Stanford Wayback is the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory site. Originally created in 1991, the SLAC site is the earliest known website in the United States.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

HighWire logo

HighWire Press, Inc. is delighted to announce the appointment of Umesh Singh as Chief Financial Officer. Umesh is a well respected financial executive with over 25 years of experience in software and technology businesses.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

SUL Rosette

In Emerging Collaborations for Accessing and Preserving Email, written by Chris Prom, Assistant University Archivist and Professor, University of Illinois for the Library of Congress website, a Stanford Libraries technology was one of several featured: "One of the most exciting presentations was provided by Peter Chan and Glynn Edwards from Stanford University."

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Photo of Lathrop Library

One of the news features in today's Stanford Report highlights the newly renovated Lathrop Library. The report details the many new amenities of the library, including its vast amount of space, which has allowed for more resources readily available from the East Asia Library, more open and closed study areas, event spaces, and classrooms. The article also boasts of Lathrop's state-of-the-art classroom and state-of-the-art technology throughout.

See Stanford's new Lathrop Library ready for Sept. 15 opening.

 

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