Yevgeny Yevtushenko, Poet Who Stirred a Generation of Soviets, Dies at 83

April 1, 2017

In an obituary for poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko, The New York Times stated: “Mr. Yevtushenko’s poems of protest, often declaimed with sweeping gestures to thousands of excited admirers in public squares, sports stadiums and lecture halls, captured the tangled emotions of Russia’s young — hope, fear, anger and euphoric anticipation — as the country struggled to free itself from repression during the tense, confused years after Joseph Stalin’s death in 1953.  In 1961 alone Mr. Yevtushenko gave 250 poetry readings.” 

The Stanford Libraries holds a substantial portion – 88 linear feet of manuscripts, correspondence, speeches, political files, biographical material, posters, photographs, clippings, video recordings, artworks, and writings by others – of the poet’s archive.

Read the entire article, Yevgeny Yevtushenko, Poet Who Stirred a Generation of Soviets, Dies at 83.

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