Supported formats

Audio

SMPL has the capacity to clean, repair, and digitally reformat a wide variety of original sound recording formats:

  • Transcription disc (AKA "acetate" or "lacquer")
  • 78 rpm disc (AKA "shellac")
  • LP (AKA "vinyl")
  • Audiocassette
  • Microcassette
  • 1/4-inch analog reel (quarter track stereo, half track and full track; 15/16, 1-7/8, 3-3/4, 7-1/2, 15, 30 ips)
  • 1/2-inch analog reel (half track and four track; 15, 30 ips)
  • Digital Audio Tape (DAT)
  • Compact Disc (CD)
  • MiniDisc

Prior to digitization, discs are gently cleaned, and tapes are cleaned on an as-needed basis. Repairs and other treatments (such as tape baking or additional lubrication) may also be carried out in order to address the adverse effects of aging, degradation or damage to the original media and to ensure the optimal capture of sound during reformatting.

Video

SMPL has the capacity to clean, repair, and digitally reformat the following formats:

  • 1/2" Sony CV
  • EIAJ-1
  • VHS (including S-VHS, Extended Play, and PAL)
  • 3/4" U-Matic
  • Betamax
  • Digital Betacam
  • Betacam SP
  • Video8 (8mm), Hi8 and Digital8
  • DV (including MiniDV, DVCAM, DVCPRO, etc.)
  • DVD

Original recordings in video reel formats other than 1/2" Sony CV and EIAJ-1 are reformatted by outside vendors who are equipped with the necessary gear to playback these older recordings.

Tapes and optical discs are gently cleaned on an as-needed basis prior to digital capture. Repairs and other treatments (such as tape baking or re-lubrication) may also be carried out in order to address the adverse effects of aging, degradation or damage to the original media and to ensure the optimal signal transfer during reformatting.

Film

At the lab, original motion picture film materials (8mm, 16mm, 35mm) are inspected for content as well as format identification and physical condition. Films are prepared for long-term storage at the SUL's off-site storage facility. Proper storage of original films may include splice repair, light cleaning, winding onto archival film cores, and rehousing in archival film cans.

To reformat motion picture materials, lab staff work with professional vendors that provide film-to-film or film-to-video transfer services.