At a glance

Special Collections & University Archives

Manuscripts Division

The Manuscripts Division of the Department of Special Collections exists to arrange, describe, preserve, and make available documents and born-digital materials of enduring historic value, both as intellectual items and as historical artifacts, to support the research needs of the undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and other scholars at Stanford University and beyond. Stanford University Library subject curators actively seek out collections to enhance our holdings. Since 2009, Special Collections has been involved in developing a Born-Digital Program in collaboration with the Digital Library Systems and Services Department.

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Chopin's signature, from MLM 217 (detail)

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Piosnka litewska (Lithuanian song), op. 74, no. 16 [1830?]

Drei Ecossaises, op. 72, no. 3 (sketches) [1830?]

A song and piano sketches by Chopin share two sides of a single leaf, once belonging to Polish ethnologist and composer Oskar Kolberg (1814- 1890), and now residing in Stanford's Memorial Library of Music.  The Kolberg and Chopin families were neighbors, and Oskar followed Chopin at the Warsaw Lyceum, studying piano with one of Chopin’s teachers. Kolberg was a lifelong collector of music manuscripts, focusing on Polish folk and national music, which he used in his scholarly endeavors.

Joseph Goldyne exhibit poster, Stanford University Libraries
A new exhibition on the second floor of the Green Library Bing Wing features the work of artist Joseph Goldyne, whose unique small-format prints using intaglio printmaking processes are credited with reviving the art of the varied edition monoprint beginning in the late 1970s. After earning a medical degree at UCSF (1968), Goldyne turned his full attention to art and never looked back. His work is informed by his study and documentation of human anatomy as well as his near-encyclopedic knowledge of art history, credentialed by a graduate degree in fine arts from Harvard.
Cassette capture in progress

In the ongoing Cabrinety-NIST Project, NIST normally performs all disk imaging, but there is an exception to the rule. When the Stanford fall session begins in late September, a subset of the Cabrinety collection will be used as teaching materials in the Rhetoric of Gaming class. Rather than send the Cabrinety boxes containing these materials to NIST (which is located in Gaithersburg, MD), and risk them not returning in time for the class, I decided to do all disk imaging at Stanford.