At a glance

Special Collections & University Archives

Manuscripts Division

The Manuscripts Division of the Department of Special Collections exists to arrange, describe, preserve, and make available documents and born-digital materials of enduring historic value, both as intellectual items and as historical artifacts, to support the research needs of the undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and other scholars at Stanford University and beyond. Stanford University Library subject curators actively seek out collections to enhance our holdings. Since 2009, Special Collections has been involved in developing a Born-Digital Program in collaboration with the Digital Library Systems and Services Department.

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News

While reading Sybil Schaefer's interview "We're All Digital Archivists Now," I was happy to see the following comment "we don’t all need to be digital archivists, but we do need to be archivists who work with digital materials. It’s not scalable to have one person, or one team, focus on the 'digital stuff.'"  

I heartily agree with her statement. Since our involvement in the AIMS project, we have required that project archivists process both the analog and digital portions of a collection. And yet, it is apparent that there is a very important role for a digital archivist. Someone who will keep up with new tools and automated processing methods, be on hand to train these project archivists, support acquisition (curators, subject specialists, donors) and explore and assist with our efforts across a wide spectrum of new projects.

If you are interested in some of the details regarding the activities and functions of SUL's digital archivist, please read Peter Chan's recent article - "What Does it Take to Be a Well-rounded Digital Archivist?

 

Army jacket, dog tags and letters from M1240 World War II letters

This summer, Public Services was delighted to have Lucia Ibarra, one of the Library's Eastside High School interns, work with us.  Lucia's project was to rehouse a previously unprocessed collection of World War II letters and note any interesting observations or information along the way.  The incredibly detailed notes she took will be used to create a finding guide (to be completed by December), but we wanted to share her description of her summer experience working with this archival collection:

I am pleased to announce that the Muñoz Family’s Atari Collection (M2010) is processed and open for research. The collection is 11 linear feet and consists of an Atari 800XL home computer, color monitor and complete set of peripherals. The collection also includes 127 consumer software titles published between 1980 and 1987.

The Muñoz Family’s Atari Collection is representative of early home computing in the 1980s when software and hardware manufacturers created products for nontechnical users wishing to use computing for entertainment (i.e. gaming) and practical uses in the home (i.e. personal finances and education). This collection compliments the Stephen M. Cabrinety Collection in the History of Microcomputing, ca. 1975-1995 (M0997) which contains software, computer hardware, peripheral devices, hand-held games, and computer industry literature documenting the microcomputing gaming industry during its formative years.

The Muñoz family generously gave their collection to Stanford University, Special Collections in 2012 and the collection was processed thanks to the efforts and talent of Melissa Pincus who worked for Public Services this summer. Melissa created the collection's finding guide which can be accessed through the collection's catalog record:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/10586501