At a glance

Special Collections & University Archives

About the Archives

Leland Stanford, Jr. on his pony, 1879The Archives was created in 1965 by the Board of Trustees to collect, preserve, and make available the historically and legally valuable records of the University and of Stanford community members. Adjunct to this responsibility is the collecting of all materials relating to the University's founders, Leland and Jane Lathrop Stanford, and to those family members who were associated with them in business ventures or the creation of Stanford University.

News

Project South, 1965

On March 13th, NPR featured a story on the Project South Collection held in the University Archives and Archive of Recorded Sound. Entitled "A King Speech You've Never Heard--Plus, Your Chance to Do Archive Sleuthing," the article describes the rich treasures found within the audio recordings, including a speech by Martin Luther King, Jr., and asks for volunteers to comb through the materials and share their findings. It also asks for volunteers to help us transcribe the remainder of the collection. So far, our crowd-sourcing experiment has yielded over twenty volunteers, who have completed five transcripts. Several more transcripts are in the works. We thank NPR and all our volunteers for their efforts as there is much work that remains to be done for this amazing collection.

The Project South Collection consists of transcribed interviews with Civil Rights workers in the South recorded by several Stanford students affiliated with the campus radio station KZSU during the summer of 1965. The project was sponsored by the Institute of American History at Stanford. Includes information relating to black history; interviews of members of the Congress of Racial Equality, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, the NAACP, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee; recordings of formal and informal remarks of persons working with smaller, independent civil rights projects, of local blacks associated with the civil rights movement, and other people, including Ku Klux Klansmen; "action tapes" of civil rights workers canvassing voters, conducting freedom schools, or participating in demonstrations ; speeches by and/or interviews with Ralph David Abernathy, Charles Evers, James Farmer, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Hosea Williams; and a Ku Klux Klan meeting and speech made by Robert Sheldon, its Imperial Wizard.

 

New acquisitions

University Archives staff transfer the media from the flooded offices of the NACC in Old Union

The Stanford University Archives is pleased to announce that it recently accessioned extensive media holdings from the Native American Cultural Center (NACC), including reel-to-reel language tapes, and VHS tapes and DVDs containing recordings of Native Research Forums, the Hanitchak Lecture Series, Native Graduation, and Hall of Fame Induction and Alumni Dinner events. Also included in the transfer are photographs of Native alumni, copies of the Stanford Native Community newsletter, and posters of the Stanford Powwow. All materials date from 1970-2014.

Keith Johnstone in Holland, 2010

The University Archives is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Keith Johnstone papers. Johnstone, a British and Canadian pioneer of improvisational theatre, is best known for inventing the Impro System and Theatresports, the latter of which has become a staple of modern improvisational comedy and is the inspiration for the television shows such as "Whose Line Is It Anyway?." As an educator, playwright, actor and theatre director Johnstone's ideas about improvisation, behaviour and performance appeal to a wide variety of groups. From actors to psychotherapists, improvisation companies to theatre schools and companies, business and management training specialists and humanities research institutes, universities and film production companies have invited him to come to teach them about his ideas, and how they might apply them.

Old Union

Thousands of Stanford University student group constitutions and other founding documents dating from the late 1970's to present day were recently transferred to Stanford's University Archives.

Martin E Hellman, professor emeritus of electrical engineering.

The University Archives is pleased to announce that it has acquired the papers of Martin E. Hellman, emeritus professor of electrical engineering at Stanford and a recent inductee into the select group of eminent faculty and alumni known Stanford Engineering Heroes.

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