Physical and digital books, media, journals, archives, and databases.
Results include
  1. Bible : the story of the King James Version, 1611-2011

    Campbell, Gordon, 1944-
    Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.

    This is a history of the King James Version of the Bible (known in Britain as the Authorised Version) over the four hundred years from its remote beginnings to the present day. Gordon Campbell, expert in Renaissance literatures, tells the fascinating and complex story of how this translation came to be commissioned, of who the translators were, and of how the translation was accomplished. The story does not end with the printing of that first edition, but introduces the subsequent generations who edited and interacted with the text.This is a history of the King James Version of the Bible (known in Britain as the Authorised Version) over the four hundred years from its remote beginnings to the present day. Gordon Campbell, expert in Renaissance literatures, tells the fascinating and complex story of how this translation came to be commissioned, of who the translators were, and of how the translation was accomplished. The story does not end with the printing of that first edition, but introduces the subsequent generations who edited and interacted with the text. The present text of the King James Version differs in thousands of small details from the original edition. Campbell traces the textual history from 1611 to the establishment of the modern text by Oxford University Press in 1769. Attitudes to the King James Version have shifted through time and territory, ranging from adulation to deprecation and attracting the attention of a wide variety of adherents. It is more widely read in America today than in any other country, and its particular history in there is given due attention. Generously illustrated with reproductions taken from early editions, this volume helps to explain the enduring popularity of the King James Version throughout the world today.

    Online EBSCO Academic Comprehensive Collection

  2. Bible : the story of the King James Version, 1611-2011

    Campbell, Gordon, 1944-
    Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.

    This is a history of the King James Version of the Bible (known in Britain as the Authorised Version) over the four hundred years from its remote beginnings to the present day. Gordon Campbell, expert in Renaissance literatures, tells the fascinating and complex story of how this translation came to be commissioned, of who the translators were, and of how the translation was accomplished. The story does not end with the printing of that first edition, but introduces the subsequent generations who edited and interacted with the text. The present text of the King James Version differs in thousands of small details from the original edition. Campbell traces the textual history from 1611 to the establishment of the modern text by Oxford University Press in 1769. Attitudes to the King James Version have shifted through time and territory, ranging from adulation to deprecation and attracting the attention of a wide variety of adherents. It is more widely read in America today than in any other country, and its particular history in there is given due attention. Generously illustrated with reproductions taken from early editions, this volume helps to explain the enduring popularity of the King James Version throughout the world today.

    Online Oxford Scholarship Online

Your search also found 24 topic specific databases.

Guides

Course- and topic-based guides to collections, tools, and services.
Library info; guides & content by subject specialists
Results include
  1. Connecting to the 1594 English Geneva Bible

    Guest blogger : Daniel Koplitz As I cradle the book in my hands, flecks of its leathered paper-board cover release into the free air. Carried affectionately like dandelion wisps in the summer breeze, the flecks disperse from the margins of their centuries-old home and, fearing nothing, return to the very dust of matter from which they were born. I’m reminded in this seeing and feeling of my own mortality, my impermanent nature. I recognize myself in these flecks, not knowing how or why but that we are undeniably connected. I open the cover weathered by devoted use, and I meet the Brookes. Their records of family births, marriages, and deaths adorn the paper board in elegant script, inspiriting the object with meaning and an aura of mystery and wonder. Who were Matthew and Elizabeth—their children? Where were they from? How did their book end up here at Stanford University, being investigated by a musicology student in 2021? Looking for answers, I gaze to the right and scan the first page, which reads The Bible. Translated according to the Ebrew and Greeke, and conferred with the best translations in divers Languages. It’s a family Bible printed in 1594, one of many English editions of the Geneva Bible first published in 1560. The opening page describes its innovative design “with most profitable Annotations upon all the hard places, and other things of great importance,” precursing the abundant reading aids peppered throughout the text and reflecting the Protestant emphasis on Scripture's accessibility. Before the English Reformation movement, set off by Henry VIII’s split from the Catholic Church in 1534,[1] the Bible, texts on biblical interpretation, and the Latin instruction required to read them were accessible only to the educated: clergymen and the wealthy. Most English people didn’t own a personal copy of the Bible, and they rarely, if ever, understood Scripture when it was sung or spoken at church. However, being cheaper than any pre-existing English Bible and packed with reading aids, the Geneva Bible shattered these pre-existing class barriers by allowing individuals of any social standing to read and study Scripture privately in their own tongue.[2] It became widely popular, facilitating the growth of domestic Bible-reading and the spread of Protestant theology across England, where more than half a million copies had been sold by the end of the sixteenth century.[3] The English Geneva Bible also traveled across the Atlantic to the New World where it became “the Bible of … the Ulster Plantation and the Pilgrim Fathers.”[4] Could this transatlantic migration have been part of the journey that led me to hold this very book today? I turn over the yellowed page and investigate further. Following a chart explaining “How to take profit by reading of the Holy Scriptures,” I peruse leaves upon leaves of the Old Testament, ancient words enveloped in early modern annotations. Eventually, I reach the end of the apocryphal books, where I discover another handwritten genealogical entry—dating Matthew Brookes’s birth and baptism—and the title page of the 1596 New Testament translation. More explanatory aids follow before I arrive at the final portion of the book: The Whole Booke of Psalmes, collected in English meetre, by Thomas Sternhold, John Hopkins, and others, conferred with the Hebrue with apt Notes to sing them withall. The subsequent pages display English paraphrases of the psalms and other sacred songs, composed in various poetic meters and set to simple monophonic tunes. Like its bound counterparts, the “Sternhold and Hopkins” metrical psalter grew out of Reformed efforts to make Christian worship and devotion more accessible to laypeople, and that included the sacred music sung both in church and at home.[5] In contrast to the sacred music previously composed in Latin for choirs of trained men and boys or for wealthy amateurs, these vernacular spiritual songs could easily be learned and performed by an Englishperson of any class or gender—whether they picked them up in their parish church or used the handy solfege notation in the scores to teach themselves at home. Further, the vernacular metrical psalter enabled women, rich or poor, to sing in a socially sanctioned context for women that didn’t revolve around men or children.[6] I wonder, then, if Elizabeth Brookes herself used this book for that purpose, “giving harmonious utterance to the meditations of [her heart]” in a society that otherwise expected her to be silent.[7] Humming through some of the tunes, I’m reminded of the modest hymns I grew up singing, which seems only natural since hymnals as they’re known today developed out of psalters just like this one.[8] Though I no longer subscribe to any religion, I see now that it was never really about the religious texts of the hymns my family and church community sang. Rather, it was the fact that through their simplicity and accessible language we were able to sing them together. That union, that connection is what was important—that’s where “God” was, in our coming together as one despite our many perceived differences. I read the final entries from the Brookes family on the back cover, and then I close the book. I accept that though I may never know their entire story or how their book ended up in my hands today, I do know that it meant a lot to them. Matthew and Elizabeth chose this book to record their family’s lineage, and its successive owners, possibly their heirs, safeguarded it until was eventually acquired and preserved by this university. Returning the book to its archival case, I reflect on my experience with it. Why it is that humans go through so much trouble to conserve old books like this one? Perhaps by showing us our history—where we’ve come from and what’s been important to us—they can remind us of who we truly are: inseparable beings sharing the same fate and yearning for connection. They seem to remind us of what’s important in life, compelling us to seek that out for not only for ourselves, but for all of humanity.  Daniel Koplitz (they/them) is a Ph.D. student in musicology at Stanford, studying Christian music and liturgy from the Western European Middle Ages and Renaissance.  [1] The Act of Supremacy, 1534, (26 Henry VIII c.1) in Gerald Bray, ed., Documents of the English Reformation: 1526–1701, Corrected reprint, Library of Ecclesiastical History (Cambridge: James Clark & Co, 2004), 113–14. [2] Femke Molekamp, “Genevan Legacies: The Making of the English Geneva Bible,” in The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England, c. 1530–1700, ed. Kevin Killeen, Helen Smith, and Rachel Willie (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), 38. [3] William H. Sherman, Used Books: Marking Readers in Renaissance England (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007), 166. [4] Jane Dawson, “John Knox, Christopher Goodman and the ‘Example of Geneva,’” in The Reception of Continental Reformation in Britain, Proceedings of the British Academy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 115. [5] Hannibal Hamlin, Psalm Culture and Early Modern English Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), 22–24. [6] Linda Phyllis Austern, “‘For Musicke Is the Handmaid of the Lord’: Women, Psalms, and Domestic Music-Making in Early Modern England,” in Psalms in the Early Modern World, ed. Linda Phyllis Austern, Kari Boyd McBride, and David L. Orvis (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011), 77. [7] Ibid. [8] Nicholas Temperley et al., “Psalms, Metrical,” in Grove Music Online, 2001.

    1. About
    2. Blogs
    3. Stanford Libraries Blog
  2. Currently in the labs - Materials from the Monuments of Printing Exhibition, Part 1

    Re-Posted from the Special Collections and Archives Exhibits Program listing - The Monuments of Printing Exhibition highlights first 250 years of printing in the West  Johannes Gutenberg's printing of a Bible from movable type in Mainz, Germany in 1455 marked the beginning of a communication revolution in the West. Printers were able to reproduce texts efficiently in quantities virtually unimaginable to a scribe. Monuments of Printing: from Gutenberg through the Renaissance, the first of two exhibitions spanning five-hundred years of printing history, demonstrates the development of typography and printing in Europe over a 250-year period as seen in selected works in the rare book collections of the Stanford University Libraries. The exhibition will open Monday, August 1, in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda on the second floor of the Bing Wing of Green Library, Stanford University, and is free and open to the public. A leaf from the Gutenberg Bible, displayed with a lectern bible manuscript exemplar, and a volume printed in 1702 with type designed for Louis XIV, bookend the exhibition of some forty titles. In between, the exhibition explores the roots of and influences on letterforms, printing, and book design in Europe in the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries, and shows work by some of the great European printers, Nicolas Jenson, Aldus Manutius, the Estienne family, and Simon de Colines among them. Highlights include Euclid's Elements (1482) by German printer Erhard Ratdolt; the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili , printed in Venice in 1499 by Aldus Manutius and considered one of the most beautiful early printed books, the Complutensian Polyglot Bible (1514-1517), printed in parallel columns in Hebrew, Latin, and Greek type, and the 1641 Virgil printed by the Imprimerie royale, one of many fine productions of France's state press. Monuments of Printing: from Gutenberg through the Renaissance will be on display from August 1 through November 27, 2011. The second exhibition, Monuments of Printing: from Caslon through the Book Arts Revival, will be on display December 5, 2011 through March 18, 2012. Exhibit cases are illuminated Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. The gallery is accessible whenever Green Library is open and hours vary with the academic schedule. For Library hours, call 650-723-0931. NOTE: first-time visitors must register at the south entrance portal to Green Library's East Wing to gain access to the exhibition in the Bing (west) Wing. For a map of campus and transportation information, go to www.stanford.edu/home/visitors/maps.html.

    1. About
    2. Blogs
    3. Digital Library Blog
  3. A large collection of early printed leaves

    Stanford University Libraries is the grateful recipient of a very generous donation of some 700 individual leaves from early printed books, the gift of Donn Faber Downing and Letitia Leigh Sanders. The vast majority of these leaves are from books from the 15th and 16th centuries and serve not only as examples of which texts were being printed with this “new” technology (Gutenberg’s Bible was printed about 1455, the first book printed in the western world with moveable type) but also how these texts were presented: their typefaces, page layout, and format.  It is a remarkable, rich collection, and will be used in a wide variety of classes. For the devotees of early printing, all the most recognized names in printing are represented: Johann Mentelin’s printing of Augustine’s De Civitate Dei (1468), Gunther Zainer’s edition of Isidore of Seville (1472),  the Sweynheym and Pannartz printing of Nicholas of  Lyra’s Postilla super Totam Bibliam (1472), Nicolas Jenson’s printing of the Bible (1479), leaves from different works produced by Anton Koberger, the great printer of Nuremberg, most famous for producing the magnificent Nuremburg Chronicle (a Latin and a German edition each appearing first in 1493), and many leaves from the different productions of Aldus Manutius, perhaps the most celebrated printer of the Renaissance.   All of these examples from these famous printers serve to deepen our knowledge and understanding (and appreciation) of just how remarkable this enterprise—printing—was and would be.  Many of these leaves are from books so rare that copies of them may not come on the market again; and if they did, their price could strain a library’s budget past the breaking point.  These leaves from books produced by famous printers make this collection a most welcome one, but the collection in fact offers far more: hundreds of leaves by less well-known printers, printers and texts that give us a more accurate sense of what was being produced in what some have referred to as the “printing revolution.”  Johnann Sensenschmidt of Nuremberg, Johann Schussler of Augsburg, Leonhard Auri of Venice, and Konrad Fryner of Esslingen are hardly household names, but all were printing in the 1470s, a scant few years after printing was introduced in Europe.  We see in these leaves not only the result of rendering texts into print, we see which texts were printed early on, an indication of what printers thought was important and what could sell.   The usual suspects are here, of course: the Bible, Albertus Magnus, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Peter Lombard, and other authors who were so important in the history of western thought.   Less well-known texts, however, abound:  Paulus Maurocenus’ De Generatione Aeterna (1473), Leonardus de Utino’s Sermones de Sanctis (1474), Albertus Brixiensis’ De Arte Loquendi et Tacendi (1474), and Poggius Florentius’ Facetiae (1475), to name a few.   Students handling these leaves will be seeing not just late medieval printing; they will likely be looking at a text previously unknown to them.  While these items are intellectually compelling in themselves, they will inevitably serve as catalysts for more research: who was this printer?  When did printing begin in this certain city?   Who was the author of the text, and why was the text considered important enough to put into print?   How many copies were printed?  Who was the intended audience?  What was the history of the text in manuscript? What copies of manuscripts were used as exemplars for a printed edition?   All of these questions on some level lie at the heart of the matter: how were networks of texts formed and nourished in the late medieval and early modern eras in Europe?  This vast selection of early printed leaves yields many possibilities and answers.  We are extremely fortunate to have this collection here in Special Collections and are very grateful to Donn Downing and Letitia Sanders for this wonderful and generous gift.     Aldine Greek Bible, 1518   Leonardus de Utino, Sermones, 1473

    1. About
    2. Blogs
    3. Special Collections Unbound

Exhibits

Digital showcases for research and teaching.
No exhibits results found... Try a different search

Yewno

Knowledge graphs for interconnecting concepts.

More search tools

Tools to help you discover resources at Stanford and beyond.