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  1. Crystals

    Mercer, Ian, 1944-
    Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1990.

  2. Crystals

    Basel, Switzerland : MDPI Pub., 2011-

    Online Find full text

  3. Crystals : for solo flute

    Moevs, Robert, 1920-2007
    Bryn Mawr, Pa. (Bryn Mawr, Pa. 19010) : T. Presser, c1982.

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  1. CrystalMaker

    CrystalMaker Software software is used for research & teaching in chemistry, solid-state physics, materials science, mineralogy and crystallography. their products are used to:     Build, display & manipulate all kinds of crystal and molecular structures.     Design new materials and relax their structures.     Animate structural behaviour; generate video for teaching or presentations.     3D Print models; create rotatable 3D models for iPhone, iPad.     Simulate diffraction properties for powders and single crystals.  

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  2. CrystalMaker software package

    A campus-wide site license for CrystalMaker is now available to current students, faculty and staff at Stanford.  Used for research and teaching in chemistry, solid-state physics, materials science, mineralogy and crystallography, this package includes three software programs: CrystalMaker, CrystalDiffract, and SingleCrystal.  Both Mac and PC versions are available (but not Linux).   After installing the software on your personal computer, you do not need to be connected to the Internet in order to use it.   You can use this software to: Build, display & manipulate all kinds of crystal and molecular structures. Design new materials and relax their structures. Animate structural behaviour; generate video for teaching or presentations. 3D Print models; create rotatable 3D models for iPhone, iPad. Simulate diffraction properties for powders and single crystals.       Many thanks to Paul Zarins for negotiating the license agreement, to Mike Nack for providing advice and technical support, and to Irina Trapido for ordering the software. 

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  3. CSD Enterprise - ALL of the data with ALL of the Software

    For the first time, academic users now have access to ALL CCDC software with the launch of CSD-Enterprise. CSD-Enterprise includes everything in the CSD-System, CSD-Discovery and CSD-Materials. The CSD-System brings you the essential crystallographic and structural chemistry capabilities to deliver knowledge from the CSD: powerful 2D/3D search, extensive geometry analysis tools, inter- and intramolecular interaction analysis, high impact graphics and new API connectivity. CSD-Discovery provides in one place all the tools you need for discovering new molecules. CSD-Materials helps you explore exciting new materials through analysing intra-and intermolecular interactions within the lattice, helping you to understand your material’s behaviours and refine its properties. Components in CSD Enterprise include DASH, Mercury, CSD System, Gold, SuperStar, and Relibase+.  Learn more about CSD Enterprise: Brochure, Datasheet, Newsletter, and What's New? We have a campus-wide site license for CSD Enterprise and for WebCSD.  For more information and to download CSD Enterprise or access WebCSD, please go to: https://library.stanford.edu/swain/software/cambridge-structural-database Who can benefit from using CSD-Enterprise? Chemical crystallographers looking to explore and understand crystal structures Protein crystallographers who need to check their ligand geometry Structural chemists who want to discover and optimize new molecules Materials scientists looking to engineer new materials and optimize their properties Structural biologists who want to understand protein function Biochemists and medicinal chemists needing to design new ligands Educators demonstrating the applications of structural chemistry to their student About the Cambridge Structural Database: Established in 1965 by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is the world’s repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures. Containing over 800,000 entries from x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses, this unique database of accurate 3D structures has become an essential resource to scientists around the world. Image credit: View image online at  http://dx.doi.org/10.5517/cc1jj92f  Ref: Khaled Hassanein, Oscar Castillo, Carlos J. Gómez-García, Félix Zamora, Pilar Amo-Ochoa, Crystal Growth and Design, 2015, DOI: 10.1021/acs.cgd.5b01110  (also see CCDC Press release: The CCDC Celebrates the 800,000th Entry in the Cambridge Structural Database, October 19, 2015).

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