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  1. Foundations of finitely supported structures : a set theoretical viewpoint

    Alexandru, Andrei
    Cham : Springer, 2020.

    This book presents a set theoretical development for the foundations of the theory of atomic and finitely supported structures. It analyzes whether a classical result can be adequately reformulated by replacing a 'non-atomic structure' with an 'atomic, finitely supported structure. It also presents many specific properties, such as finiteness, cardinality, connectivity, fixed point, order and uniformity, of finitely supported atomic structures that do not have non-atomic correspondents. In the framework of finitely supported sets, the authors analyze the consistency of various forms of choice and related results. They introduce and study the notion of 'cardinality' by presenting various order and arithmetic properties. Finitely supported partially ordered sets, chain complete sets, lattices and Galois connections are studied, and new fixed point, calculability and approximation properties are presented. In this framework, the authors study the finitely supported L-fuzzy subsets of a finitely supported set and the finitely supported fuzzy subgroups of a finitely supported group. Several pairwise non-equivalent definitions for the notion of 'infinity' (Dedekind infinity, Mostowski infinity, Kuratowski infinity, Tarski infinity, ascending infinity) are introduced, compared and studied in the new framework. Relevant examples of sets that satisfy some forms of infinity while not satisfying others are provided. Uniformly supported sets are analyzed, and certain surprising properties are presented. Finally, some variations of the finite support requirement are discussed. The book will be of value to researchers in the foundations of set theory, algebra and logic.This book presents a set theoretical development for the foundations of the theory of atomic and finitely supported structures. It analyzes whether a classical result can be adequately reformulated by replacing a 'non-atomic structure' with an 'atomic, finitely supported structure'. It also presents many specific properties, such as finiteness, cardinality, connectivity, fixed point, order and uniformity, of finitely supported atomic structures that do not have non-atomic correspondents. In the framework of finitely supported sets, the authors analyze the consistency of various forms of choice and related results. They introduce and study the notion of 'cardinality' by presenting various order and arithmetic properties. Finitely supported partially ordered sets, chain complete sets, lattices and Galois connections are studied, and new fixed point, calculability and approximation properties are presented. In this framework, the authors study the finitely supported L-fuzzy subsets of a finitely supported set and the finitely supported fuzzy subgroups of a finitely supported group. Several pairwise non-equivalent definitions for the notion of 'infinity' (Dedekind infinity, Mostowski infinity, Kuratowski infinity, Tarski infinity, ascending infinity) are introduced, compared and studied in the new framework. Relevant examples of sets that satisfy some forms of infinity while not satisfying others are provided. Uniformly supported sets are analyzed, and certain surprising properties are presented. Finally, some variations of the finite support requirement are discussed. The book will be of value to researchers in the foundations of set theory, algebra and logic.

    Online SpringerLink

  2. Finitely supported mathematics : an introduction

    Alexandru, Andrei
    Cham : Springer, 2016.

    In this book the authors present an alternative set theory dealing with a more relaxed notion of infiniteness, called finitely supported mathematics (FSM). It has strong connections to the Fraenkel-Mostowski (FM) permutative model of Zermelo-Fraenkel (ZF) set theory with atoms and to the theory of (generalized) nominal sets. More exactly, FSM is ZF mathematics rephrased in terms of finitely supported structures, where the set of atoms is infinite (not necessarily countable as for nominal sets). In FSM, 'sets' are replaced either by ̀invariant sets' (sets endowed with some group actions satisfying a finite support requirement) or by ̀finitely supported sets' (finitely supported elements in the powerset of an invariant set). It is a theory of ̀invariant algebraic structures' in which infinite algebraic structures are characterized by using their finite supports. After explaining the motivation for using invariant sets in the experimental sciences as well as the connections with the nominal approach, admissible sets and Gandy machines (Chapter 1), the authors present in Chapter 2 the basics of invariant sets and show that the principles of constructing FSM have historical roots both in the definition of Tarski ̀logical notions' and in the Erlangen Program of Klein for the classification of various geometries according to invariants under suitable groups of transformations. Furthermore, the consistency of various choice principles is analyzed in FSM. Chapter 3 examines whether it is possible to obtain valid results by replacing the notion of infinite sets with the notion of invariant sets in the classical ZF results. The authors present techniques for reformulating ZF properties of algebraic structures in FSM. In Chapter 4 they generalize FM set theory by providing a new set of axioms inspired by the theory of amorphous sets, and so defining the extended Fraenkel-Mostowski (EFM) set theory. In Chapter 5 they define FSM semantics for certain process calculi (e.g., fusion calculus), and emphasize the links to the nominal techniques used in computer science. They demonstrate a complete equivalence between the new FSM semantics (defined by using binding operators instead of side conditions for presenting the transition rules) and the known semantics of these process calculi. The book is useful for researchers and graduate students in computer science and mathematics, particularly those engaged with logic and set theory.In this book the authors present an alternative set theory dealing with a more relaxed notion of infiniteness, called finitely supported mathematics (FSM). It has strong connections to the Fraenkel-Mostowski (FM) permutative model of Zermelo-Fraenkel (ZF) set theory with atoms and to the theory of (generalized) nominal sets. More exactly, FSM is ZF mathematics rephrased in terms of finitely supported structures, where the set of atoms is infinite (not necessarily countable as for nominal sets). In FSM, 'sets' are replaced either by 'invariant sets' (sets endowed with some group actions satisfying a finite support requirement) or by 'finitely supported sets' (finitely supported elements in the powerset of an invariant set). It is a theory of 'invariant algebraic structures' in which infinite algebraic structures are characterized by using their finite supports. After explaining the motivation for using invariant sets in the experimental sciences as well as the connections with the nominal approach, admissible sets and Gandy machines (Chapter 1), the authors present in Chapter 2 the basics of invariant sets and show that the principles of constructing FSM have historical roots both in the definition of Tarski 'logical notions' and in the Erlangen Program of Klein for the classification of various geometries according to invariants under suitable groups of transformations. Furthermore, the consistency of various choice principles is analyzed in FSM. Chapter 3 examines whether it is possible to obtain valid results by replacing the notion of infinite sets with the notion of invariant sets in the classical ZF results. The authors present techniques for reformulating ZF properties of algebraic structures in FSM. In Chapter 4 they generalize FM set theory by providing a new set of axioms inspired by the theory of amorphous sets, and so defining the extended Fraenkel-Mostowski (EFM) set theory. In Chapter 5 they define FSM semantics for certain process calculi (e.g., fusion calculus), and emphasize the links to the nominal techniques used in computer science. They demonstrate a complete equivalence between the new FSM semantics (defined by using binding operators instead of side conditions for presenting the transition rules) and the known semantics of these process calculi. The book is useful for researchers and graduate students in computer science and mathematics, particularly those engaged with logic and set theory.

    Online SpringerLink

  3. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD [electronic resource]

    Washington, D.C. : United States. Dept. of Energy. ; Oak Ridge, Tenn. : distributed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Dept. of Energy, 2016

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for $\pi$-$\pi$ scattering in the I = 1, J = 1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark favors ($N_f = 2$). We extract the $\rho$ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to $m_{\pi} = 226$MeV and $m_{\pi} = 315$MeV, and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase-shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, $m_{\rho} = 720(1)(15)$MeV, is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

    Online OSTI

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