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  1. Homicide in the biblical world

    Barmash, Pamela, 1966-
    Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.

    This book examines the way homicide was prosecuted and punished in the Bible and shows how justice reflects the religion and culture of the Bible. The book compares the law of the Bible to the law of the ancient Near East.Homicide in the Biblical World analyses the treatment of homicide in the Hebrew Bible and demonstrates that it is directly linked to the unique social structure and religion of ancient Israel. Close parallels between biblical law and ancient Near Eastern law are evident in the laws of the ox that gored and the pregnant woman who is assaulted, but, when the total picture of the process by which homicide was adjudicated comes into view, what is most noticeable is how little of it is similar to ancient Near Eastern law. This book reconstructs biblical law from both legal texts and narrative texts and analyses both the law collections and documents from actual legal cases from the ancient Near East.

    Online EBSCO Academic Comprehensive Collection

  2. The laws of Hammurabi : at the confluence of royal and scribal traditions

    Barmash, Pamela, 1966-
    New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2020]

    Among the best-known and most esteemed people known from antiquity is the Babylonian king Hammurabi. His fame and reputation are due to the collection of laws written under his patronage. This book offers an innovative interpretation of the Laws of Hammurabi. Ancient scribes would demonstrate their legal flair by composing statutes on a set of traditional cases, articulating what they deemed just and fair. The scribe of the Laws of Hammurabi advanced beyond earlier scribes in composing statutes that manifest systematization and implicit legal principles, and inserted the Laws of Hammurabi into the form of a royal inscription, shrewdly reshaping the genre. This tradition of scribal improvisation on a set of traditional cases continued outside of Mesopotamia. It influenced biblical law and the law of the Hittite empire significantly. The Laws of Hammurabi was also witness to the start of another stream of intellectual tradition. It became the subject of formal commentaries, marking a profound cultural shift. Scribes related to it in ways that diverged from prior attitudes; it became an object of study and of commentary, a genre that names itself as dependent on another text. The famous Laws of Hammurabi is here given the extensive attention it continues to merit.

    Online Oxford Scholarship Online

  3. Homicide in the biblical world [electronic resource]

    Barmash, Pamela, 1966-
    Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.

    Homicide in the Biblical World analyses the treatment of homicide in the Hebrew Bible and demonstrates that it is directly linked to the unique social structure and religion of ancient Israel. Close parallels between biblical law and ancient Near Eastern law are evident in the laws of the ox that gored and the pregnant woman who is assaulted, but, when the total picture of the process by which homicide was adjudicated comes into view, what is most noticeable is how little of it is similar to ancient Near Eastern law. This book reconstructs biblical law from both legal texts and narrative texts and analyses both the law collections and documents from actual legal cases from the ancient Near East.

    Online Ebook Central

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