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  1. South American and Antarctic continental cenozoic birds : paleobiogeographic affinities and disparities

    Tambussi, Claudia
    Dordrecht ; London : Springer, ©2013.

    Modern birds (Neornithes) are represented by two big lineages, the Palaeognathae (Tinamiformes + Ratitae) and the Neognathae [Galloanserae + Neoaves (Metaves + Coronoaves)]. Both clades sum approximately 10,000 species of which 60% are Passeriformes (the most diverse clade of terrestrial vertebrates). A comparison between the past and the present reveals a complex and hallmarked evolutionary and biogeographic history which would have begun over 65 million years ago. For South America (SA) this includes: (1) the presence of taxa with uncertain affinities and the absence of Passeriformes during the Paleogene; (2) a progressive and accelerated increase of the species starting at the Neogene (Miocene); (3) important extinct lineages (e.g. Phorusrhacidae, Teratornithidae) that migrate to North America after the rising of the Panamá isthmus; (4) groups with major diversification in the Neogene that survives nowadays represented by scarce species endemic of SA (Cariamidae) or that inhabits mainly in the southern hemisphere (Anhingidae); (5) very diverse living groups with scarce (e.g., Passeriformes) or none (e.g., Apodiformes) fossil record in SA, which stem-groups are registered in Europe. Apparently, the changes in diversity of the south American Neornithes have been the result of successive radiation, biogeographic connections with North America and in a minor scale, some extinctions. The opening of the Drakés passage and the occurrence of the circumpolar Antarctic flow are not sufficient causes to explain the highly disparity between the weddelians penguins (Sphenisciformes) of Antartica and those of the patagonian Atlantic Ocean.Modern birds (Neornithes) are represented by two big lineages, the Palaeognathae (Tinamiformes + Ratitae) and the Neognathae [Galloanserae + Neoaves (Metaves + Coronoaves)]. Both clades sum approximately 10,000 species of which 60% are Passeriformes (the most diverse clade of terrestrial vertebrates). A comparison between the past and the present reveals a complex and hallmarked evolutionary and biogeographic history which would have begun over 65 million years ago. For South America (SA) this includes: (1) the presence of taxa with uncertain affinities and the absence of Passeriformes during the Paleogene; (2) a progressive and accelerated increase of the species starting at the Neogene (Miocene); (3) important extinct lineages (e.g. Phorusrhacidae, Teratornithidae) that migrate to North America after the rising of the Panama isthmus; (4) groups with major diversification in the Neogene that survives nowadays represented by scarce species endemic of SA (Cariamidae) or that inhabits mainly in the southern hemisphere (Anhingidae); (5) very diverse living groups with scarce (e.g., Passeriformes) or none (e.g., Apodiformes) fossil record in SA, which stem-groups are registered in Europe. Apparently, the changes in diversity of the south American Neornithes have been the result of successive radiation, biogeographic connections with North America and in a minor scale, some extinctions. The opening of the Drake's passage and the occurrence of the circumpolar Antarctic flow are not sufficient causes to explain the highly disparity between the weddelians penguins (Sphenisciformes) of Antartica and those of the patagonian Atlantic Ocean.

    Online SpringerLink

  2. Pacific flyway : waterbird migration from the Arctic to Tierra del Fuego

    Hammerson, Geoffrey A.
    Seattle, WA : Sasquatch Books, [2020]

    "I have been investigating publishing a book about the Pacific Flyway in the mode of The Salish Sea: a beautifully visual book with highly informed text. There is a surprising dearth of books about the Pacific Flyway, despite its prominence as a subject on the Audubon website. Awareness of the flyway would give any birdwatcher an advantage in seeing the greatest numbers of birds. The Pacific Flyway encompasses the great swath of territory from the Arctic to southern South America that supports the migrations of many bird varieties. Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and California figure prominently in the flyway"--"Stretching from the Arctic regions of northeastern Russia, Alaska, and western Canada and along the Pacific coastlines of North, Central, and South America, the Pacific Flyway traverses some of our planet's greatest climatic and topographic extremes. Defined by water, the flyway encompasses a sweeping expanse of coastal and offshore marine ecosystems and an inland archipelago of freshwater wetlands. Hemispheric in scope, this integrated network of ecosystems is linked by its moving parts--the millions of migratory birds whose lives depend on this 10,000-mile (16,000-km) corridor as they travel between their breeding and overwintering grounds. With their ocean- and continent-spanning travels, waterbirds are our sentinels in a changing world--each of their journeys revealing the fraying edges of the web of life that sustains us all. Pacific Flyway perfectly blends amazing photography, science writing, and storytelling to illuminate the profound challenges faced by migratory birds and to inspire a longterm commitment to global conservation efforts."--AmazonThe migratory waterbirds of the Pacific Flyway convert food, air, and water into a mileage plan that has few equals in the animal world. Set against a backdrop of stunning images from more than 120 internationally acclaimed photographers, this book shares the amazing stories of these migrants - a cast of characters that includes shorebirds, seabirds and waterfowl. Stretching from the Arctic regions of northeastern Russia, Alaska and western Canada and along the Pacific coastlines of North, Central and South America, the Pacific Flyway traverses some of our planet's greatest climatic and topographic extremes. Defined by water, the flyway encompasses a sweeping expanse of coastal and offshore marine ecosystems and an inland archipelago of freshwater wetlands. Hemispheric in scope, this integrated network of ecosystems is linked by its moving parts - the millions of migratory birds whose lives depend on this 10,000-mile (16,000-km) corridor as they travel between their breeding and overwintering grounds. With their ocean- and continent-spanning travels, waterbirds are our sentinels in a changing world, each of their journeys revealing the fraying edges of the web of life that sustains us all. 'Pacific Flyway' perfectly blends amazing photography, science writing and storytelling to illuminate the profound challenges faced by migratory birds and to inspire a long-term commitment to global conservation efforts.

  3. Behavioral ecology of neotropical birds [digital]

    Cham : Springer, 2019.

    This book covers central aspects of behavioral ecology, including sexual selection, social and genetic mating systems, cooperative breeding, brood parasitism, brood reduction, migration, personalities, and communication. Over the past several years, Neotropical bird species from temperate to tropical latitudes of South America have been extensively studied yielding valuable insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that drive their behavioral traits. International experts provide a general overview of main behavioral aspects, and present the main findings of their work, including experimental approaches to testing the most accepted behavioral theory in their model systems. They propose new theoretical frameworks and future research directions. The book provides a comprehensive and updated guide for all researchers, students, and professionals whose work involves the study and management of birds across the Neotropical region.

    Online link.springer.com

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