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  1. The core model

    Dodd, A. (Anthony), 1952-
    Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1982.

    The core model, K, is a generalization of Gödel's constructible universe of set theory; K is used to produce 'fine structural' results of a less restrictive kind. This book aims to introduce the core model to those with a basic knowledge of axiomatic set theory. The covering lemma for K is the main technical result but other applications are also considered. The author gives a full exposition of general fine structure and of iterated ultrapowers and concludes the work with a short section on the difficulties encountered in constructing more general core models using 'extenders'.The core model, K, is a generalization of Goedel's constructible universe of set theory; K is used to produce 'fine structural' results of a less restrictive kind. This book aims to introduce the core model to those with a basic knowledge of axiomatic set theory. The covering lemma for K is the main technical result but other applications are also considered. The author gives a full exposition of general fine structure and of iterated ultrapowers and concludes the work with a short section on the difficulties encountered in constructing more general core models using 'extenders'.

    Online EBSCO Academic Comprehensive Collection

  2. Computing : the technology of information

    Dodd, A. (Anthony), 1952-
    New York : Oxford University Press, 1995.

    Fast, powerful computers are commonplace in today's world. Found in homes, schools, offices, and public libraries, they have changed the way we learn, communicate, and conduct business. Yet, while computers are easier than ever to use, the science and technology behind these marvelous machines remain a mystery to many. This unique book provides an introduction to the inside world of computers. It tells about their origin, historical development, and increasing sophistication, and the secrets of electronics and computation behind their familiar "finger-tip" wizardry. Readers will learn about the digital revolution and the advent of an information age that was nearly unimaginable a few years ago. From software programming to parallel processing, the key themes and topics of our computer era are fully explained in jargon-free entries everyone can understand. As part of the New Encyclopedia of Science, the book features the same easy-to-use structure found in other volumes, including keyword sections, factfiles, timecharts, and colorful graphics. It is an ideal resource for anyone who has ever wondered how computers really work and about the human ingenuity behind them.

  3. Prolog : a logical approach

    Dodd, A. (Anthony), 1952-
    Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.

    Procedural programming languages, such as FORTRAN, Pascal and C, expect the programmer to build a representation of the solution to a problem using a model of the execution process of a computer. The goal of logic programming is to provide a higher level formalism, in which the solution is represented using a formal representation that was in use before computers were invented: logic. The present volume starts with an explanation of how logic may be used as a programming language, and then explains the practical limitations that at present restrict logic programmers to the use of the subset of logic embodied in the prolog programming language. Enhancements to Prolog that compensate for the weakness of its underlying logic, but compromise the purity of the language are then introduced. Most Prolog systems add to the logical core of the language a bewildering variety of extra features for procedural tasks such as input/output. The second part of the book presents some of the most commonly met features, including all facilities that are common to all Prologs. As well as the most commonly used facilities, there is an account of more abstruse topics such as garbage collection. The third part of the volume is concerend with programming style. Its principal aim is to show that despite the illogicalities available in Prolog, the programmer may construct programs that conform to the principles of logic programming by adhering to a number of design criteria. Efficiency of programs is also considered at length. An approach to debugging Polog programs is presented. Finally the process of designing Prolog programs is discussed and there is an extended example showing how an application is developed.

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