Physical and digital books, media, journals, archives, and databases.
Results include
  1. Speaking with the people's voice : how presidents invoke public opinion

    Drury, Jeffrey P. Mehltretter, 1979-
    First edition. - College Station : Texas A&M University Press, [2014]

    The role of public opinion in American democracy has been a central concern of scholars who frequently examine how public opinion influences policy makers and how politicians, especially presidents, try to shape public opinion. But in Speaking with the People's Voice: How Presidents Invoke Public Opinion, Jeffrey P. Mehltretter Drury asks a different question that adds an important new dimension to the study of public opinion: How do presidents rhetorically use public opinion in their speeches? In a careful analysis supported by case studies and discrete examples, Drury develops the concept of "invoked public opinion" to study the modern presidents' use of public opinion as a rhetorical resource. He defines the term as "the rhetorical representation of the beliefs and values of US citizens." Speaking with the People's Voice considers both the strategic and democratic value of invoked public opinion by analyzing how modern presidents argumentatively deploy references to the beliefs and values of US citizens as persuasive appeals as well as acts of political representation in their nationally televised speeches.

    Online EBSCO University Press

  2. Speaking with the people's voice : how presidents invoke public opinion

    Drury, Jeffrey P. Mehltretter, 1979-
    First edition. - College Station : Texas A & M University Press, [2014]

    The role of public opinion in American democracy has been a central concern of scholars who frequently examine how public opinion influences policy makers and how politicians, especially presidents, try to shape public opinion. But in Speaking with the People's Voice: How Presidents Invoke Public Opinion, Jeffrey P. Mehltretter Drury asks a different question that adds an important new dimension to the study of public opinion: How do presidents rhetorically use public opinion in their speeches? In a careful analysis supported by case studies and discrete examples, Drury develops the concept of invoked public opinion to study the modern presidents' use of public opinion as a rhetorical resource. He defines the term as the rhetorical representation of the beliefs and values of US citizens. Speaking with the People's Voice considers both the strategic and democratic value of invoked public opinion by analyzing how modern presidents argumentatively deploy references to the beliefs and values of US citizens as persuasive appeals as well as acts of political representation in their nationally televised speeches.The role of public opinion in American democracy has been a central concern of scholars who frequently examine how public opinion influences policy makers and how politicians, especially presidents, try to shape public opinion. But in Speaking with the People's Voice: How Presidents Invoke Public Opinion, Jeffrey P. Mehltretter Drury asks a different question that adds an important new dimension to the study of public opinion: How do presidents rhetorically use public opinion in their speeches? In a careful analysis supported by case studies and discrete examples, Drury develops the concept of "invoked public opinion" to study the modern presidents' use of public opinion as a rhetorical resource. He defines the term as "the rhetorical representation of the beliefs and values of US citizens." Speaking with the People's Voice considers both the strategic and democratic value of invoked public opinion by analyzing how modern presidents argumentatively deploy references to the beliefs and values of US citizens as persuasive appeals as well as acts of political representation in their nationally televised speeches.

    Online EBSCO Academic Comprehensive Collection

  3. Rhetoric, politics, and Hamilton : an American musical

    New York : Peter Lang, [2021]

    "Rhetoric, Politics, and Hamilton: An American Musical approaches Lin-Manuel Miranda's groundbreaking cultural production as a rhetorical text with implications for contemporary U.S. politics. The contributors to this volume utilize training in rhetorical criticism and performance studies to analyze the musical in relation to three broad themes: national public memory, social and cultural identity, and democracy and social change. Each chapter offers unique insights on its own accord while the volume as a whole explores multiple facets of the musical, from the theater performance and the soundtrack to the musical's circulation in public discourse and the Chicago exhibition. The diversity of topics and methods means that the volume is suitable for students of rhetoric and U.S. politics at the same time even the "HamilFans" will learn something new"--

Guides

Course- and topic-based guides to collections, tools, and services.
No guide results found... Try a different search

Library website

Library info; guides & content by subject specialists
No website results found... Try a different search

Exhibits

Digital showcases for research and teaching.
No exhibits results found... Try a different search

EarthWorks

Geospatial content, including GIS datasets, digitized maps, and census data.
No earthworks results found... Try a different search

More search tools

Tools to help you discover resources at Stanford and beyond.