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  1. Visual information retrieval using Java and LIRE

    Lux, Mathias
    Cham, Switzerland : Springer, ©2013.

    Visual information retrieval (VIR) is an active and vibrant research area, which attempts at providing means for organizing, indexing, annotating, and retrieving visual information (images and videos) from large, unstructured repositories. The goal of VIR is to retrieve matches ranked by their relevance to a given query, which is often expressed as an example image and/or a series of keywords. During its early years (1995-2000), the research efforts were dominated by content-based approaches contributed primarily by the image and video processing community. During the past decade, it was widely recognized that the challenges imposed by the lack of coincidence between an image's visual contents and its semantic interpretation, also known as semantic gap, required a clever use of textual metadata (in addition to information extracted from the image's pixel contents) to make image and video retrieval solutions efficient and effective. The need to bridge (or at least narrow) the semantic gap has been one of the driving forces behind current VIR research. Additionally, other related research problems and market opportunities have started to emerge, offering a broad range of exciting problems for computer scientists and engineers to work on. In this introductory book, we focus on a subset of VIR problems where the media consists of images, and the indexing and retrieval methods are based on the pixel contents of those images--an approach known as content-based image retrieval (CBIR). We present an implementation-oriented overview of CBIR concepts, techniques, algorithms, and figures of merit. Most chapters are supported by examples written in Java, using Lucene (an open-source Java-based indexing and search implementation) and LIRE (Lucene Image REtrieval), an open-source Java-based library for CBIR.Visual information retrieval (VIR) is an active and vibrant research area, which attempts at providing means for organizing, indexing, annotating, and retrieving visual information (images and videos) from large, unstructured repositories. The goal of VIR is to retrieve matches ranked by their relevance to a given query, which is often expressed as an example image and/or a series of keywords. During its early years (1995-2000), the research efforts were dominated by content-based approaches contributed primarily by the image and video processing community. During the past decade, it was widely recognized that the challenges imposed by the lack of coincidence between an image's visual contents and its semantic interpretation, also known as semantic gap, required a clever use of textual metadata (in addition to information extracted from the image's pixel contents) to make image and video retrieval solutions efficient and effective. The need to bridge (or at least narrow) the semantic gap has been one of the driving forces behind current VIR research. Additionally, other related research problems and market opportunities have started to emerge, offering a broad range of exciting problems for computer scientists and engineers to work on. In this introductory book, we focus on a subset of VIR problems where the media consists of images, and the indexing and retrieval methods are based on the pixel contents of those images -- an approach known as content-based image retrieval (CBIR). We present an implementation-oriented overview of CBIR concepts, techniques, algorithms, and figures of merit. Most chapters are supported by examples written in Java, using Lucene (an open-source Java-based indexing and search implementation) and LIRE (Lucene Image REtrieval), an open-source Java-based library for CBIR.

    Online SpringerLink

  2. Visual information retrieval using Java and LIRE [electronic resource]

    Lux, Mathias
    San Rafael, Calif. (1537 Fourth Street, San Rafael, CA 94901 USA) : Morgan & Claypool, c2013.

    Visual information retrieval (VIR) is an active and vibrant research area, which attempts at providing means for organizing, indexing, annotating, and retrieving visual information (images and videos) from large, unstructured repositories. The goal of VIR is to retrieve matches ranked by their relevance to a given query, which is often expressed as an example image and/or a series of keywords. During its early years (1995- 2000), the research efforts were dominated by content-based approaches contributed primarily by the image and video processing community. During the past decade, it was widely recognized that the challenges imposed by the lack of coincidence between an image's visual contents and its semantic interpretation, also known as semantic gap, required a clever use of textual metadata (in addition to information extracted from the image's pixel contents) to make image and video retrieval solutions efficient and effective. The need to bridge (or at least narrow) the semantic gap has been one of the driving forces behind current VIR research. Additionally, other related research problems and market opportunities have started to emerge, offering a broad range of exciting problems for computer scientists and engineers to work on. In this introductory book, we focus on a subset of VIR problems where the media consists of images, and the indexing and retrieval methods are based on the pixel contents of those images--an approach known as content-based image retrieval (CBIR). We present an implementation-oriented overview of CBIR concepts, techniques, algorithms, and figures of merit. Most chapters are supported by examples written in Java, using Lucene (an open-source Java-based indexing and search implementation) and LIRE (Lucene Image REtrieval), an open-source Java-based library for CBIR.Visual information retrieval (VIR) is an active and vibrant research area, which attempts at providing means for organizing, indexing, annotating, and retrieving visual information (images and videos) from large, unstructured repositories. The goal of VIR is to retrieve matches ranked by their relevance to a given query, which is often expressed as an example image and/or a series of keywords. During its early years (1995-2000), the research efforts were dominated by content-based approaches contributed primarily by the image and video processing community. During the past decade, it was widely recognized that the challenges imposed by the lack of coincidence between an image's visual contents and its semantic interpretation, also known as semantic gap, required a clever use of textual metadata (in addition to information extracted from the image's pixel contents) to make image and video retrieval solutions efficient and effective. The need to bridge (or at least narrow) the semantic gap has been one of the driving forces behind current VIR research. Additionally, other related research problems and market opportunities have started to emerge, offering a broad range of exciting problems for computer scientists and engineers to work on. In this introductory book, we focus on a subset of VIR problems where the media consists of images, and the indexing and retrieval methods are based on the pixel contents of those images -- an approach known as content-based image retrieval (CBIR). We present an implementation-oriented overview of CBIR concepts, techniques, algorithms, and figures of merit. Most chapters are supported by examples written in Java, using Lucene (an open-source Java-based indexing and search implementation) and LIRE (Lucene Image REtrieval), an open-source Java-based library for CBIR.

    Online Synthesis Digital Library

  3. Multimedia semantics : the role of metadata

    Berlin : Springer, ©2008.

    Research in the field of multimedia metadata is especially challenging: Lots of scientific publications and reports on research projects are published every year and the range of possible applications is diverse and huge. This book gives an overview on fundamental issues within the field of multimedia metadata focusing on contextualized, ubiquitous, accessible and interoperable services on a higher semantic level. The book in hand provides a selection of basic articles being a base for multimedia metadata research. Furthermore it presents a view on the current state of the art in multimedia metadata research. It provides information from versatile applications domains (Broadcasting, Interactive TV, E-Learning and Social Software) such as: * Multimedia on the Web 2.0 * Databases for Multimedia (Meta- )Data * Multimedia Information Retrieval & Evaluation * Multimedia Metadata Standards * Ontologies for Multimedia The multimedia metadata community (www.multimedia-metadata.info), wherefrom this book originated, brings together experts from research and industry in the area of multimedia metadata research and application development. The community bridges the gap between an academic research and an industrial scale development of innovative products. By summarizing the work of the community this book contributes to the aforementioned fields by addressing these topics for a broad range of readers.Research in the field of multimedia meta data is especially challenging: Lots of scientific publications and reports on research projects are published every year and the range of possible applications is diverse and huge. This book gives an overview on fundamental issues within the field of multimedia meta data focusing on contextualized, ubiquitous, accessible and inter operable services on a higher semantic level. The book in hand provides a selection of basic articles being a base for multimedia meta data research. Furthermore it presents a view on the current state of the art in multimedia meta data research. It provides information from versatile applications domains (Broadcasting, Interactive TV, E-Learning and Social Software) such as: multimedia on the Web 2.0; databases for multimedia (Meta-)Data; multimedia information retrieval and evaluation; multimedia meta data standards; and, ontologies for multimedia. The multimedia meta data community, where from this book originated, brings together experts from research and industry in the area of multimedia meta data research and application development. The community bridges the gap between an academic research and an industrial scale development of innovative products. By summarizing the work of the community this book contributes to the aforementioned fields by addressing these topics for a broad range where from readers.

    Online SpringerLink

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