Physical and digital books, media, journals, archives, and databases.
Results include
  1. Street justice : a history of police violence in New York City

    Johnson, Marilynn S.
    Boston, Mass. : Beacon Press, c2003.

  2. Street justice : a history of police violence in New York City

    Johnson, Marilynn S.
    Boston, Mass. : Beacon Press, c2003.

    In this study of police brutality in New York City, Marilynn Johnson explores the changing patterns of police use of force over the past 160 years, including streat beatings, organized violence against protestors, and the notorious third degree. She argues that the idea of police brutality--what exactly it is, who its victims are, and why it occurs--is historically constructed. In the late nineteenth century police brutality was understood as an outgrowth of the moral and political corruption of Tammany Hall; in the heavy immigration years of the early twentieth century it was redefined as a racial/ethnic issue; and during Prohibition police violence was connected to police corruption related to the underground liquor trade and the "war on crime" the federal government declared in response. Providing a history of police brutality up to the present day, Street justice emphasizes the understandings brought to the subject by its victims, and reveals a long and disturbing history of police misconduct against minorities. But Johnson also argues that the culture of policing can be changed when enough political pressure is brought to bear on the problem.

  3. Fight the power : African Americans and the long history of police brutality in New York City

    Taylor, Clarence
    New York : New York University Press, [2019]

    A story of resistance, power and politics as revealed through New York City's complex history of police brutality The 2014 killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri was the catalyst for a national conversation about race, policing, and injustice. The subsequent killings of other black (often unarmed) citizens led to a surge of media coverage which in turn led to protests and clashes between the police and local residents that were reminiscent of the unrest of the 1960s. Fight the Power examines the explosive history of police brutality in New York City and the black community's long struggle to resist it. Taylor brings this story to life by exploring the institutions and the people that waged campaigns to end the mistreatment of people of color at the hands of the police, including the black church, the black press, black communists and civil rights activists. Ranging from the 1940s to the mayoralty of Bill de Blasio, Taylor describes the significant strides made in curbing police power in New York City, describing the grassroots street campaigns as well as the accomplishments achieved in the political arena and in the city's courtrooms. Taylor challenges the belief that police reform is born out of improved relations between communities and the authorities arguing that the only real solution is radically reducing the police domination of New York's black citizens.

    Online EBSCO University Press

Guides

Course- and topic-based guides to collections, tools, and services.
No guide results found... Try a different search

Library website

Library info; guides & content by subject specialists
No website results found... Try a different search

Exhibits

Digital showcases for research and teaching.
No exhibits results found... Try a different search

EarthWorks

Geospatial content, including GIS datasets, digitized maps, and census data.
No earthworks results found... Try a different search

More search tools

Tools to help you discover resources at Stanford and beyond.