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  1. International secured transactions law : facilitation of credit and international conventions and instruments

    Akseli, N. Orkun (Nazim Orkun)
    London ; New York : Routledge, 2011.

    This book focuses on international harmonisation and the law of secured transactions by distilling and analysing the unifying principles of various significant international conventions and instruments such as the UN Convention on the Assignment of Receivables, the Unidroit Convention on International Factoring, the EBRD Model Law on Secured Transactions, the Unidroit Convention on the International Interests in Mobile Equipment and the UNCITRAL Legislative Guide on Secured Transactions. International secured transactions conventions and instruments facilitate credit and promote economic activity through the creation of harmonised rules. Therefore, given the increasing globalisation of markets, international reform efforts for the harmonised modernisation of secured transactions law have gained pace over recent years. International Secured Transactions Law draws on experiences in both English and US laws in order to identify and illustrate the existing problems that need to be addressed, as well as identify potential solutions. International Secured Transactions Law will be of interest to scholars, students interested in international commercial law, corporate law or comparative secured transactions, and practitioners involved in international commercial transactions.

  2. Financial stability and prudential regulation : a comparative approach to the UK, US, Canada, Australia and Germany

    Lui, Alison
    London : Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2017.

    Financial stability is one of the key tenets of a central bank's functions. Since the financial crisis of 2007-2009, an area of hot debate is the extent to which the central bank should be involved with prudential regulation. This book examines the macro and micro-prudential regulatory frameworks and systems of the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States, Canada and Germany. Drawing on the regulator frameworks of these regions, this book examines the central banks' roles of crisis management, resolution and prudential regulation. Alison Lui compares the institutional structure of the new 'twin-peaks' model in the UK to the Australian model, and the multi-regulatory US model and the single regulatory Canadian model. The book also discusses the extent the central bank in these countries, as well as the ECB, are involved with financial stability, and argues that the institutional architecture and geographical closeness of the Bank of England and Financial Policy Committee give rise to the fear that the UK central bank may become another single super-regulator, which may provide the Bank of England with too much power. As a multi-regional, comparative study on the importance and effectiveness of prudential regulation, this book will be of great use and interest to students and researchers in finance and bank law, economics and banking.

  3. Fiduciary law and responsible investing : in nature's trust

    Richardson, Benjamin J.
    London ; New York : Routledge, 2013.

    This book is about fiduciary law's influence on the financial economy's environmental performance, focusing on how the law affects responsible investing and considering possible legal reforms to shift financial markets closer towards sustainability. Fiduciary law governs how trustees, fund managers or other custodians administer the investment portfolios owned by beneficiaries. Written for a diverse audience, not just legal scholars, the book examines in a multi-jurisdictional context an array of philosophical, institutional and economic issues that have shaped the movement for responsible investing and its legal framework. Fiduciary law has acquired greater influence in the financial economy in tandem with the extraordinary recent growth of institutional funds such as pension plans and insurance company portfolios. While the fiduciary prejudice against responsible investing has somewhat waned in recent years, owing mainly to reinterpretations of fiduciary and trust law, significant barriers remain. This book advances the notion of 'nature's trust' to metaphorically signal how fiduciary responsibility should accommodate society's dependence on long-term environmental well-being. Financial institutions, managing vast investment portfolios on behalf of millions of beneficiaries, should manage those investments with regard to the broader social interest in sustaining ecological health. Even for their own financial self-interest, investors over the long-term should benefit from maintaining nature's capital. We should expect everyone to act in nature's trust, from individual funds to market regulators. The ancient public trust doctrine could be refashioned for stimulating this change, and sovereign wealth funds should take the lead in pioneering best practices for environmentally responsible investing.

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