Physical and digital books, media, journals, archives, and databases.
Results include
  1. Colonialism and resistance in Belize : essays in historical sociology

    Bolland, O. Nigel
    2nd rev. ed. - Benque Viejo del Carmen, Belize : Cubola Productions ; Barbados : University of the West Indes Press, 2003.

    The social history of Belize is marked by conflict; between British settlers and the Maya; between masters and slaves; between capitalists and workers; and between the colonial administration and the Belizean people. Belize shares many features with other parts of the Caribbean Central America, including a long history of colonialism and slavery, a dependent economy in which the ownership of land is highly concentrated, and the population which is largely poor. In this collection of essays, Boland analyzes the most import topics during three centuries of colonialism. Part One examines the early British settlement, the nature of slavery in Belize, and the development of Creole culture in the nineteenth century. Part Two analyzes the relations of between the Maya and the British in the nineteenth century. Part Three considers systems of labour control after Emancipation and discusses the origins of modern politics in the labour movement of the 1930s and 1940s. Part Four considers the complex issues of ethnicity and politics in the contemporary arena.

  2. The rise of market society in England, 1066-1800

    Eisenberg, Christiane, 1956-
    New York : Berghahn, 2013.

    Focusing on England, this study reconstructs the centuries-long process of commercialization that gave birth to the modern market society. It shows how certain types of markets (e.g. those for real estate, labor, capital, and culture) came into being, and how the social relations mediated by markets were formed. The book deals with the creation of institutions like the Bank of England, the Stock Exchange, and Lloyd's of London, as well as the way the English dealt with the uncertainty and the risks involved in market transactions. Christiane Eisenberg shows that the creation of a market society and modern capitalism in England occurred under circumstances that were utterly different from those on the European continent. In addition, she demonstrates that as a process, the commercialization of business, society, and culture in England did not lead directly to an industrial society, as has previously been suggested, but rather to a service economy. Christiane Eisenberg is Professor of British History at the Centre for British Studies at the Humboldt University, Berlin.Her interests lie in the comparative social and cultural histories of Germany and Britain in the 19th and 20th centuries. Internationally she is known for her work on the diffusion of modern sport.

  3. The rise of market society in England, 1066-1800

    Eisenberg, Christiane, 1956-
    New York : Berghahn, 2013.

    Focusing on England, this study reconstructs the centuries-long process of commercialization that gave birth to the modern market society. It shows how certain types of markets (e.g. those for real estate, labor, capital, and culture) came into being, and how the social relations mediated by markets were formed. The book deals with the creation of institutions like the Bank of England, the Stock Exchange, and Lloyd's of London, as well as the way the English dealt with the uncertainty and the risks involved in market transactions. Christiane Eisenberg shows that the creation of a market soc.Focusing on England, this study reconstructs the centuries-long process of commercialization that gave birth to the modern market society. It shows how certain types of markets (e.g. those for real estate, labor, capital, and culture) came into being, and how the social relations mediated by markets were formed. The book deals with the creation of institutions like the Bank of England, the Stock Exchange, and Lloyd's of London, as well as the way the English dealt with the uncertainty and the risks involved in market transactions. Christiane Eisenberg shows that the creation of a market society and modern capitalism in England occurred under circumstances that were utterly different from those on the European continent. In addition, she demonstrates that as a process, the commercialization of business, society, and culture in England did not lead directly to an industrial society, as has previously been suggested, but rather to a service economy. Christiane Eisenberg is Professor of British History at the Centre for British Studies at the Humboldt University, Berlin.Her interests lie in the comparative social and cultural histories of Germany and Britain in the 19th and 20th centuries. Internationally she is known for her work on the diffusion of modern sport.

    Online EBSCO Academic Comprehensive Collection

Guides

Course- and topic-based guides to collections, tools, and services.
No guide results found... Try a different search

Exhibits

Digital showcases for research and teaching.
No exhibits results found... Try a different search

EarthWorks

Geospatial content, including GIS datasets, digitized maps, and census data.
No earthworks results found... Try a different search

More search tools

Tools to help you discover resources at Stanford and beyond.