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  1. Secure multi-party computation against passive adversaries

    Choudhury, Ashish
    Cham : Springer, [2022]

    This book focuses on multi-party computation (MPC) protocols in the passive corruption model (also known as the semi-honest or honest-but-curious model). The authors present seminal possibility and feasibility results in this model and includes formal security proofs. Even though the passive corruption model may seem very weak, achieving security against such a benign form of adversary turns out to be non-trivial and demands sophisticated and highly advanced techniques. MPC is a fundamental concept, both in cryptography as well as distributed computing. On a very high level, an MPC protocol allows a set of mutually-distrusting parties with their private inputs to jointly and securely perform any computation on their inputs. Examples of such computation include, but not limited to, privacy-preserving data mining; secure e-auction; private set-intersection; and privacy-preserving machine learning. MPC protocols emulate the role of an imaginary, centralized trusted third party (TTP) that collects the inputs of the parties, performs the desired computation, and publishes the result. Due to its powerful abstraction, the MPC problem has been widely studied over the last four decades. In addition, this book: Includes detailed security proofs for seminal protocols and state-of-theart efficiency improvement techniques Presents protocols against computationally bounded as well as computationally unbounded adversaries Focuses on MPC protocols in the passive corruption model, presents seminal possibility and feasibility results, and features companion video lectures.This book focuses on multi-party computation (MPC) protocols in the passive corruption model (also known as the semi-honest or honest-but-curious model). The authors present seminal possibility and feasibility results in this model and includes formal security proofs. Even though the passive corruption model may seem very weak, achieving security against such a benign form of adversary turns out to be non-trivial and demands sophisticated and highly advanced techniques. MPC is a fundamental concept, both in cryptography as well as distributed computing. On a very high level, an MPC protocol allows a set of mutually-distrusting parties with their private inputs to jointly and securely perform any computation on their inputs. Examples of such computation include, but not limited to, privacy-preserving data mining; secure e-auction; private set-intersection; and privacy-preserving machine learning. MPC protocols emulate the role of an imaginary, centralized trusted third party (TTP) that collects the inputs of the parties, performs the desired computation, and publishes the result. Due to its powerful abstraction, the MPC problem has been widely studied over the last four decades.

    Online SpringerLink

  2. The mobile agent rendezvous problem in the ring

    Kranakis, Evangelos
    Cham, Switzerland : Springer, ©2010.

    Mobile agent computing is being used in fields as diverse as artificial intelligence, computational economics and robotics. Agents' ability to adapt dynamically and execute asynchronously and autonomously brings potential advantages in terms of fault-tolerance, flexibility and simplicity. This monograph focuses on studying mobile agents as modelled in distributed systems research and in particular within the framework of research performed in the distributed algorithms community. It studies the fundamental question of how to achieve rendezvous, the gathering of two or more agents at the same node of a network. Like leader election, such an operation is a useful subroutine in more general computations that may require the agents to synchronize, share information, divide up chores, etc. The work provides an introduction to the algorithmic issues raised by the rendezvous problem in the distributed computing setting. For the most part our investigation concentrates on the simplest case of two agents attempting to rendezvous on a ring network. Other situations including multiple agents, faulty nodes and other topologies are also examined. An extensive bibliography provides many pointers to related work not covered in the text. The presentation has a distinctly algorithmic, rigorous, distributed computing flavor and most results should be easily accessible to advanced undergraduate and graduate students in computer science and mathematics departments.

    Online SpringerLink

  3. Quorum systems : with applications to storage and consensus

    Vukolić, Marko
    Cham, Switzerland : Springer, ©2012.

    A quorum system is a collection of subsets of nodes, called quorums, with the property that each pair of quorums have a non-empty intersection. Quorum systems are the key mathematical abstraction for ensuring consistency in fault-tolerant and highly available distributed computing. Critical for many applications since the early days of distributed computing, quorum systems have evolved from simple majorities of a set of processes to complex hierarchical collections of sets, tailored for general adversarial structures. The initial non-empty intersection property has been refined many times to account for, e.g., stronger (Byzantine) adversarial model, latency considerations or better availability. This monograph is an overview of the evolution and refinement of quorum systems, with emphasis on their role in two fundamental applications: distributed read/write storage and consensus.

    Online SpringerLink

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