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  1. Visual cultures of science : rethinking representational practices in knowledge building and science communication

    Hanover, N.H. : Dartmouth College Press : University Press of New England, c2006.

    Issues of representation affect every aspect of scientific activity, from the encoding, display, analysis, and presentation of data to the communication of scientific concepts and information to students and the general public. The essays in this collection explore the issues involved in the creation and deployment of visual representations in both the natural and the social sciences. "Visual Cultures of Science" offers a mix of theoretical analyses and revealing case studies. The latter address such topics as the technologies of visualization (from X-ray machines to films made by anthropologists), the persuasive power of the graphic presentation of data (including a critique of the work of Edward Tufte), and the distillation of data into pedagogical representations such as scientific wall charts for classroom use. With its useful mix of theory and case study, the book addresses both abstract and practical issues of representation, as well as demonstrating the importance of recognizing historicized perspectives in addressing issues of representation. These essays, by many of the field's leading minds today, offer solid research and new information pertaining to the methods, purposes, and implications of scientific visual culture.

  2. The islands of Benoît Mandelbrot : fractals, chaos, and the materiality of thinking

    New York : Bard Graduate Center : Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture ; New Haven ; London : Distributed by Yale University Press, [2012], ©2012.

    "Over the past few decades, the "pictorial turn" in the natural sciences, prompted by the computer's capacity to produce visual representations, has generated considerable theoretical interest. Poised between their materiality and the abstract level they are meant to convey, scientific images are always intersections of form and meaning. Benoît Mandelbrot (1924-2010), one of the best-known producers of digital images in scientific and industrial research, was particularly curious about the ways in which the materiality of scientific representation was able to influence the development of the ideas and abstractions the images embodied.Using images and objects found in Mandelbrot's office, this book questions the relationship between the visual and scientific reasoning in fractal geometry and chaos theory, among the most popular fields to use digital scientific imagery in the past century. These unpublished materials offer new connections between the material world and that of mathematical ideas. Work by Adrien Douady and Otto Rössler provides historical depth to the analysis"--Over the past few decades, the "pictorial turn" in the natural sciences, prompted by the computer's capacity to produce visual representations, has generated considerable theoretical interest. Poised between their materiality and the abstract level they are meant to convey, scientific images are always intersections of form and meaning. Benoit Mandelbrot (1924-2010), one of the best-known producers of digital images in scientific and industrial research, was particularly curious about the ways in which the materiality of scientific representation was able to influence the development of the ideas and abstractions the images embodied. Using images and objects found in Mandelbrot's office, this book questions the relationship between the visual and scientific reasoning in fractal geometry and chaos theory, among the most popular fields to use digital scientific imagery in the past century. These unpublished materials offer new connections between the material world and that of mathematical ideas. Work by Adrien Douady and Otto Rossler provides historical depth to the analysis.

  3. Communicating genetics [electronic resource] : visualisations and representations

    Yu, Han, 1980-
    London : Palgrave Macmillan, c2017.

    This book examines the visual representations used in the popular communication of genetics. Drawing upon public science communication theories, information design theories, and social semiotics, the book offers both in-depth analyses and high-level synthesis of how genetics is visualized for the U.S. public from the early 20th century to the present. Individual chapters focus on six visual genres: photographs, micrographs, illustrations, genetic code images, quantitative graphs, and molecular structure images. Han Yu challenges readers to consider the significance of these images we often take for granted, including their historical contexts, scientific backstories, information richness, stylistic choices, economic motivations, and social implications. In doing so, the book reveals the complex cognitive, affective, and social-cultural factors that both shape and are shaped by these images. The book will be particularly useful to scholars of public science communication and visual communication, practitioners of science communication, and scientists from a range of related life science disciplines.

    Online EBSCOhost

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