Digital Library Blog

Announcing the ArcLight Phase II work cycle kickoff

August 19, 2019
by Mark A. Matienzo

Last week, contributors from five institutions – Stanford University, Duke University, Indiana University, University of Michigan, and Princeton University – kicked off a collaborative nine-week work cycle for ArcLight. The work cycle, which runs from August 13 to October 11, 2019, will build on the ArcLight MVP implementation from 2017, and focuses on refining ArcLight’s usability and accessibility, addressing strategic needs in a community-based project. Major areas for this work cycle include:

  • Usability and accessibility refinements, including potential design changes
  • Revamping the tools used for indexing archival description into ArcLight’s Solr index
  • Analysis and implementation supporting better integration with request management systems, digital object viewers, and more

You can follow our work on the #arclight channel on the Code4Lib Slack team or the GitHub project board for the current work cycle. We expect to release public demo videos on YouTube, and will share them on Slack as well as the arclight-community Google Group to report on our progress. The work cycle’s conclusion coincides with the 2019 Blacklight Summit, to be held in Durham, North Carolina from October 9-11.

Full text search result for "salmon" in https://exhibits.stanford.edu/jarndyce-test

Improved user experience for full-text search in Spotlight exhibits and image viewer

July 29, 2019
by Catherine A. Aster

At the beginning of July we announced the release of Stanford Libraries' new viewer for image items in the Stanford Digital Repository. The viewer now provides enhanced support for full text search, with a new user interface afforded by the integration of Mirador 3 in the July 1st release.

Please view the following video to see a demonstration of full text search basics.

Aaron Sharpe with experimental setup

SDR Deposit of the Week: Tunable properties of graphene

It's likely not news to you that Stanford researchers are undertaking all manner of cutting-edge and groundbreaking work. Applied Physics graduate student Aaron Sharpe is one such researcher who has become intrigued by a single-atom-thick layer of carbon called graphene that he says has, "continuously shaken up the field of condensed matter physics." Graphene sheets, as well as stacks of these sheets, show "unique and tunable electronic properties." We see why Aaron couldn't resist! We talked to Aaron about the research he and his colleagues have been undertaking with graphene and that has recently been published in Science.

Outreach by Stanford science librarians led Aaron to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR), which he used to make the data and code for this publication publicly-available. "We chose the SDR because it was an easy process to make our data publicly available and permanent and to obtain a digital object identifier (DOI) to reference it in our publication." We completely agree with Aaron's comment that "with any publication, it is important that the data be publicly available."

Andrew Berger standing before a California redwood tree

Andrew Berger joins Stanford Libraries as Repository Manager

Digital Library Systems and Services is happy to welcome Andrew Berger to our staff in the role of Repository Manager. His first day with Stanford Libraries is July 22, 2019. 

In this role, Andrew will build on his recent experience at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, where he served for five years as Senior Digital Archivist responsible for managing the museum's digital repository and for coordinating the museum's digital preservation activities across the content life-cycle, from initial acquisition to long-term preservation and public access. 

Graphical Abstract describing this research

SDR Deposit of the Week: Rocks and sustainable energy

When you think about rocks, you might not think about energy, but Christopher Zahasky does. Chris has been looking at vesicular basaltic volcanic rocks, like the one shown below, and the way fluid flows through them (see the graphical abstract for his recent article above). "These volcanic rocks are an important source of geothermal energy and provide a potential location for large-scale subsurface carbon dioxide storage for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation," Chris told us. "Understanding fluid flow is important for more effectively using these types of geologic systems for sustainable energy resource development."

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