You are here

Digital Library Blog



Three new digital collections were added to SearchWorks during the month of July. This brings the total number of digital collections available in SearchWorks to 93. The collections recently added are:

Title: A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory mesocosms

Abstract: Software code to accompany the manuscript "A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory aquaria" by L.P. Miller and J. D. Long

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

logo of the 2015 Joint Conference on Digital Libraries

We've written before on our restoration of the oldest U.S. website, covering in detail how we did it and some interesting discoveries we made along the way. More recently, Web Archiving Engineer Ahmed AlSum prepared a visual diagram (see below) of the steps involved in packaging, indexing, and making accessible the legacy web content in a poster for the Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL), an annual meeting sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) focused on research and development for digital libraries. Notably, the display won the Best Poster Award! We celebrate the continued community interest in Ahmed's innovative work.

winning poster for JCDL 2015, titled 'Reconstruction of U.S. First Website'

Two new digital collections were added to SearchWorks during the month of June. This brings the total number of digital collections available in SearchWorks to 90. The collections recently added are:

A novel computational method of metabolic network analysis for genetic discovery

Abstract: Java scripts for re-production of the computational method being published in Pharmacogenetics and Genomics 2012, 22:877–886

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

Undergraduate Theses, Department of Biology, 2014-2015 

Abstract: Honors theses written by undergraduates in the Stanford University Department of Biology, 2014-2015.

Collection contact: Michael Newman

The integration of digital collections into SearchWorks means that items from collections containing digital material can be discovered in the course of searching and browsing through the totality of Stanford's vast library catalog.

For more information on depositing materials into the Stanford Digital Repository, visit our website. For questions or additional information about the Stanford Digital Repository service, please email us at

The Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) recently deposited two significant collections into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR), the Terry Smythe AMICA Collection and the Stanford Soundtrack Collection.

Researchers at Stanford are doing a lot of innovative and intriguing work. Their efforts are often highlighted in the Stanford Report, which provides readers with a brief compilation of the latest Stanford News via email each weekday. When those of us at Stanford Libraries who work on digital preservation read these articles, we immediately wonder what these researchers are doing to preserve all that wonderful research data.

Never ones to rest on our laurels, Stanford Libraries staff have been reaching out to these researchers and recommending that they preserve the data generated from these studies -- and sometimes submitted to journals as supplementary data files -- in the Stanford Digital Repository. We would hate to see all that innovative and intriguing work lost to the ravages of time!

Three new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These collections take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Data

Abstract: These items are intended for use in Stanford Geospatial Center teaching materials.

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

logo of the International Internet Preservation Consortium

A couple of weeks have passed since the successful conclusion of the annual IIPC General Assembly, hosted this year by Stanford University Libraries and Internet Archive. The meeting has been pretty well summarized already in posts by Sawood Alam, Jefferson Bailey, Emmanuelle Bermes, Tom Cramer, Carlos Eduardo Entini, and Ian Milligan. Rather than contributing another retrospective, I'd like to instead look ahead to 2016 and consider what the web archiving community might accomplish together in the coming year, highlighting some of the opportunities discussed and presented two weeks ago.

This past week saw the 2015 General Assembly of the IIPC, International Internet Preservation Coalition--probably the biggest week and biggest event of the year in the web archiving world. The IIPC has 50 members from 30 countries, and comprises the leading web archiving institutions in the world, including tons of national libraries, the Internet Archive, and a growing number of research institutions.