You are here

Digital Library Blog

RSS

Archives

Ochre Sea Stars (Pisaster ochraceus)

Making historical data sets available to the world is one of the many ways the Stanford Digital Repository is promoting data preservation and sharing. This Deposit of the Week from Hopkins Marine Station is a perfect example of that.

Pisaster ochraceus--the ochre sea star--lives along the rocky coast of Central California and the Hopkins Marine Life Refuge. Studies of the ochre sea star population over time help scientists better understand what is happening to the population and how outside forces like the reintroduction of a possible predator or local environmental changes can affect it. 

The Stanford Media Preservation Lab (SMPL) – the unit responsible for digitization and preservation of Stanford University Libraries' (SUL) extensive holdings of sound recordings and moving images -- is busy this summer preparing for our new home at 425 Broadway in Redwood City. SMPL is one of several SUL divisions relocating from our current occupancies at 1450-1454 Page Mill Road at the behest of the University.

Over 50 pieces of film, audio, video playback and treatment equipment -- nearly 1 ton of gear -- plus the desks of SMPL's four staff will be moved over Labor Day weekend (August 31 – September 2, 2013). In preparation for the move, normal lab operations will begin to wind down in early August. The work to reconfigure, cable and re-install the equipment will take 2-4 weeks. We expect to resume regular levels of services and productivity by October 1.

Some of the latest work underway in Digital Library Systems and Services involves adding digital collections to SearchWorks. Last week saw the addition of five new collections to SearchWorks, all created and deposited to the Stanford Digital Repository using the Self-Deposit web application.

Of the five, we’re highlighting Preserving Virtual Worlds, a collection produced by curator Henry Lowood and a team of collaborators in a multi-institution project funded by the Library of Congress. Original software, gameplay samples, technical documentation, web sites, and other contextual information for games like SimCity, DOOM, and Star Raiders are archived for the ages.  Henry’s blog announcement sums up the project and collection nicely.

Stanford University Libraries has partnered with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to preserve one of the world’s largest collections of software. Funded by the National Software Reference Laboratory (NSRL), Stanford and NIST will spend two years digitally preserving the 15,000 software titles in the Stephen M. Cabrinety Collection in the History of Microcomputing held by Stanford University Libraries (SUL).   

The Cabrinety Collection is one of the largest pristine historical collections of microcomputing software in the world, including titles from virtually all of the major microcomputer platforms, including home computer and video game consoles. The collection was assembled by Stephen M. Cabrinety (1966-1995), who began collecting software as a young teenager and maintained an intensive interest in computer history throughout his life. Stanford University acquired the entire collection as a gift from the Cabrinety family in 1998.

Catgut Acoustical Society logo

Stanford University Libraries has provided digital access to large portions of the Musical Acoustics Research Library (MARL) making available important research papers from some of the most eminent acousticians of the 20th century. The MARL collection consisting of nearly 60 linear feet of materials is dedicated to the study of all aspects of musical acoustics.

The Digital Production Group recently finished digitization of the Musical Acoustics Research Library collection and the content is now online.  This collection consists of independent archives or libraries assembled by distinguished groups or individuals in the field of musical acoustics research.  MARL is comprised of the Catgut Acoustical Society Library, the Arthur H. Benade Archive, the John Backus Archive, and the John W. Coltman Archive.

Some of the acoustical knowledge in this research archive has been used by leading players and manufacturers to modify the production of instruments, and the design of concert halls and recording studios.  The research covers not only wind instruments, but also room acoustics, and the interplay between acoustical physicas and the mechanisms of auditory processing . The collection consists of papers, photograhs, medua, digital materials, wood samples, clarinet mouth pieces, and lab equipment.

Above photo taken from the Catgut Acoustical Society Library, Series1, Box18, Folder8 - Condax, Louis M. - Photos: Curtis, and Condax in Studio (http://purl.stanford.edu/qq458wj3438#flipbook)

Check out the collection online: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/view?docId=kt6h4nf6qc;developer=local;style=oac4;doc.view=items

We're pleased to announce the release of Version 1.6 of Parker on the Web, the sixth incremental site release since the launch of Version 1.0 in Fall 2009.

Version 1.6 constitutes a major improvement in the availability of journal article citation live links. Selected article citations in the Parker bibliography are now live links to digital versions of those articles, enabling Parker on the Web subscribers to quickly navigate to the full-text scholarly resources and thus expedite their research. Approximately 1200 live links are now available in the bibliography. This functionality requires an institutional subscription to each vendor's journal database. This new feature is only available to Parker on the Web subscribers.

The image depicted above is from Parker Manuscript 8, with the accompanying explanation of significance, below, provided by Christopher de Hamel, Parker Librarian, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge University.

The month of May was the traditional time for love, in medieval custom and romantic literature.The earliest surviving Anglo-Norman love-song is a chance survival of part of a mid-thirteenth-century parchment sheet which was re-used as a flyleaf at the end of a later manuscript of the Speculum historiale of Vincent of Beauvais. It preserves a polyphonic setting for three voices, opening approximately, ‘Would you hear the said story, how Guyot wastes his effort, for his lady love, who is too distant from him? [Night] and day he goes imploring her not to be unkind’, with the refrain, “Mes amerousette, / Douce camousette, / Kar éez pité / De vos amourettes”, ‘My dearest love, Sweet snub-nosed one, Take pity on your lover!” Parker Library MS 8, fol.i, verso.

 

The Undergraduate Theses collections for Physics and Engineering Physics are now open for deposit. This year’s crop of top undergraduates in the Department of Physics and in the Engineering Physics program have the distinction of being the first undergrads to deposit their theses in the SDR. These two are the first of several honors theses collections opening this quarter. (The School of Education is assembling their collection together now, and two other departments may follow suit.)

Librarian Stella Ota manages the collections, working with faculty, staff, and the selected students to use the Self Deposit application. She has been collecting digital honors theses offline since 2010. When the ETD system launched in fall 2009, Stella had a vision for using a similar process to collect the Physics undergraduate theses for access and preservation in the SDR. Yet without a deposit interface, it proved to be challenging to track down each student, to have them sign a hard-copy deposit agreement, to collect the PDF files by thumbdrive or email, and to create the metadata. The Self Deposit workflow promises to make the whole process of collecting and archiving these works more systematic, more secure, and more efficient.

Pages