Blogs

Aida in Paris at the Théâtre Italien, 1876

April 3, 2017
by Mimi Tashiro

At the December 7, 2015 auction at Sotheby’s London, the Stanford Libraries acquired a manuscript copy of Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Aida, used for the performances at the Théâtre Italien in Paris in 1876. The manuscript, which will be housed in the Department of Special Collections, was the focus of a seminar, Music 310: Aida in Paris (and Beyond) taught by Professor Heather Hadlock of the Music Department in Fall 2016. Seminar participants were Kelly Christensen, Kirstin Haag, Michael Kinney, Tyler Mitchell, Ben Ory and David Wilson.

Mis Madres poster

Immigrants, refugees and borders: April book exhibit

April 3, 2017
by Regina Lee Roberts

Stanford University Libraries has a monthly book exhibit of circulating books in Green Library in order to highlight special topics. For April 2017, librarians in the social sciences, humanities and area studies have curated a sample of selected resources on "Immigration, Refugees and Borders". The image of "Mis Madres" by Ester Hernandez is from the Stanford Libraries' Special Collections M1301 and is reproduced here courtesy of the artist.

Lockss logo

Changing LOCKSS

March 22, 2017
by Nicholas Taylor

You may already know the story of LOCKSS’ beginnings (PDF).

On a fall day in 1999, a hike in the woods became the backdrop for a spontaneous problem-solving session on the preservation gap affecting online journals. The hikers, an electronic serials librarian (Vicky Reich) and a computer scientist (David Rosenthal), sketched out a plan to replicate the incidentally distributed, redundant architecture by which print journals had been preserved, in a digital system. They brought the proposal to the Stanford University Librarian, Michael Keller, who famously blessed the project with the admonition, “don’t cost me any money; don’t get me into trouble; do what you want.”

Erasmus Adagia front cover

William Cecil’s copy of Erasmus’s Adagia

March 22, 2017
by Ann K.D. Myers

A recently cataloged item in our Rare Books Collection, a gift from Friend of the Library Frank J. Novak III, has an interesting provenance. The book in question is a 1533 Basel edition of humanist scholar Erasmus’s Adagia, an enormous collection of proverbs in Latin and Greek. It was issued in multiple editions from 1500-1536, each edition larger than the last as Erasmus found more entries culled from his reading of ancient literature. The Adagia is the source of many commonplace sayings in Western European languages, such as “the grass is greener over the fence,” “many hands make light work,” etc.

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