Special Collections Unbound

Annual regional conference of the Chinese Student Alliance held at Stanford University in 1924

Frank Y. Chuck papers now available for research

May 10, 2021
by Hanna Ahn

The Frank Y. Chuck papers are now open for research. This collection consists of materials relating to the life and career of Frank Y. Chuck, a noted research chemist and one of Stanford University’s earliest graduates of color. Included are academic transcripts, diplomas, domestic and international patents, professional papers, notebooks, correspondence, photographs that feature Stanford’s Chinese American student community from the 1920s, and an oral history interview transcript.

Shah Commission of Inquiry Report 1, page 1

LEGACIES OF CONFLICT in South Asia: The Right to Heal

How many of us first developed an understanding of the Indian subcontinent and its peoples from the writings of Vikram Seth, Salman Rushdie or Rohinton Mistry? Their stories, A Suitable Boy, Midnight's Children and A Fine Balance, introduced the rest of the world to the socio-political tensions fomenting in India since its independence from Britain in 1947.

ePADD version 8 now available

The ePADD development team is excited to announce the release of version 8!

ePADD is free and open source software developed by Stanford Libraries' Special Collections & University Archives that uses natural language processing and machine learning to support archival appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery for email of historical or cultural value.

Improved Performance for Large Collections

Hanna Ahn

Welcome Hanna Ahn!

March 14, 2021
by Josh Schneider
We are very happy to welcome our new Assistant University Archivist, Hanna Ahn! Hanna comes to us from Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU) in Chicago, IL, where she most recently served as the University Archivist.
Parker 2.1 home page

Parker on the Web 2.1 Launches

March 3, 2021
by Benjamin L Albritton

When Parker on the Web 2.0 launched in 2018, it was the culmination of a long-term development plan to host an international collaborative project on sustainable infrastructure at no cost to the user. The engineering effort was immense, and that effort paid off: we saw a nearly 10-fold increase in visitors to the site, and the incorporation of IIIF functionality to the Parker manuscript content allowed the digital objects to be used in a myriad of new projects, from AI-driven initiatives like handwritten text recognition and feature recognition, to crowdsourcing transcription projects, and aggregation and reuse across multiple platforms. While Parker 2.0 was a technical success, the intellectual content of the site - the painstakingly-crafted descriptive metadata produced in the late 2000s that drove Parker on the Web 1.0 - was not fully added to the new platform. Thanks to the encouragement of dedicated Parker on the Web users and scholars, we were able to prioritize a large-scale reassessment of the project descriptive metadata, identify gaps, and restore the manuscript descriptions to their full glory - improving the discovery functionality for the site and providing users with rich descriptions for every manuscript in the collection. Parker on the Web 2.1, released on March 3, 2021, finally completes the migration of the project from a stand-alone site built on bespoke software and using a customized and unique metadata structure to a sustainable and extensible collaboration built on open source software and common metadata standards.

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