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The Stanford ePADD team has been invited to demo the software at the Computation + Journalism Symposium 2016. Demonstrations will take place on September 30, 5-7 pm, in the courtyard adjacent to Paul Brest Hall on the Stanford campus.

Soon after, in early October, we will head to New York for our partner meeting, to discuss specifications for version 3.0, which is expected to release in February 2017. New York University has graciously offered to host our two-day meeting.
 
An assortment of photos from the Kojima family papers

A few weekends ago I went to the relatively-newly reopened SFMOMA. Their exhibition "About Time: Photography in a Moment of Change" features artist Jason Lazarus' installation Recordings #3 (At sea), 2014-2016. It's a wall of found photographs hung so that the actual photograph faces the wall, with only the text written on the back of the photo visible to the viewer.

Morris Cooper Foote

Stanford has recently acquired and processed two collections from American military officers operating overseas in the early 20th century. The papers of Morris Cooper Foote (M2103) and Warren Jay Terhune (M2132) chronicle several critical episodes in Western expansionism and occupation in Asia and its responses.

Morris Cooper Foote’s papers include a variety of material (manuscripts, journals, letters, memos, reports, photographs, maps, newspapers) from his service in the United States Army’s Ninth Infantry. Most of it concerns his experiences in the Boxer Rebellion, but he was already a seasoned veteran at the time. Foote was born September 16, 1843 in New York. His great-grandfather was William Cooper, the founder of Cooperstown, and he was also related to Jacob Morris, who served in the Revolutionary War, and novelist James Fenimore Cooper.

In my role as manuscripts cataloger, I get to experience the joy of encountering new and different material every day. A recent acquisition that came across my desk was a handwritten manuscript compiled by William Hustler for Jane Fell (the two wed in 1796), titled Salmagundi: A Miscellaneous Combination of Original Poetry Consisting of Amatory, Elegiac, Sonnets, and Other Palatable Ingredients.

Antigone.

This year, Stanford Classics turns 125, and to celebrate, we have put together an exhibit examining its early history. While small and undistinguished early on, the department quickly produced scholars of distinction. Today it is a major center of American classics, and a world leader in the study of ancient Greece and Rome. Still, the century and a quarter that intervenes between us and its foundation is often a sort of ever-advancing black box—that is, we seldom have an institutional memory that extends any further back than the recollection of the faculty's most senior member. Earlier outlines of the department's history are therefore simply lost. This exhibit hopes to shed some light on that earlier place and time.

Freya Channing

We are pleased to announce that Freya Channing has joined our Department as the Rare Books Copy Cataloger! Please join us in welcoming her to the fold. She will begin her new position on May 1.

Freya is already familiar to many of us as she has been working in Special Collections as the Processing Assistant on the Helen & Newton Harrison Papers for the past year and a half. Prior to that her work experience has included other archival processing projects, processing and describing printed ephemera, cataloging art books, and a wide variety of digital projects including metadata creation and cleanup. Freya has a B.A. from Mills College and an MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh.

Helen & Newton Harrison, 1988

Stanford University Library’s Department of Special Collections has completed processing for two major collections: the Helen and Newton Harrison Papers and the William Hewlett Papers. The two projects were supported with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, respectively.

The Chitty Chitty Bang Bang automobile from the 1968 film

A guest post from one of our Road & Track project archivists, Beaudry Allen:
There is always something unexpected to find when processing a collection. You do not have to be a car aficionado or even know the first thing about cars to at least have a slight remembrance of the car in film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. While the memories evoked by the car may be its ability to fly or float in water, the car was based on the legendary Brooklands cars of Count Louis Vorow Zborowski. Zborowski was a famous 1920s English racing driver and automobile engineer known for building his own race cars, some of which were called “Chitty Bang Bang.” Ian Fleming was influenced by Zborowski’s engineered car and its eccentricities when he wrote the famed children’s story of the same name. When the 1968 film adaptation started, mock-ups were built in the Edwardian-style. They actually worked, but apparently in the style of the day the cars only had brakes on the rear wheels, which meant that there were no brakes if you went in reverse. So the car may not be safe for the road today - but certainly one for memory lane.
The Road & Track collection is currently being processed, but a portion of the archive is available. A preliminary guide is available here:
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/c8j38wwz

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