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Special Collections Unbound



Natalie Jean Marine-Street

The Stanford Historical Society (SHS) and University Archives are pleased to announce that Natalie Jean Marine-Street has joined our ranks as the Oral History Program Manager (OHPM) for the SHS. As OHPM, Natalie will manage current oral history projects, plan and execute new projects, and serve as steward for existing SHS oral history collections.

Natalie is a Ph.D. candidate in United States History at Stanford. Her research focuses on the interrelationships between business, gender, and politics and the role of persuasion in the economy.  Her dissertation project examines the history of female sales agents who, from the mid-nineteenth century, sought economic independence by travelling to sell new, mass-produced consumer goods. Inquiring about “lady agents” sheds light on how mass consumerism spread, how work and identity interact, and how occupations become gender-typed, contributing to economic inequality.

Please join us in welcoming Natalie to the fold.

We are delighted to share that Special Collections and University Archives has been awarded a National Leadership Grant for Libraries through the Institute for Museum & Library Studies (IMLS), to fund additional development of ePADD, open source software that supports archival processes around the appraisal, ingest, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.

The initial public release of ePADD was made available on Github on June 30, 2015, following two years of development funded through the National Historical Publications & Records Commission.

This second phase of development, beginning November 1, 2015, will specifically focus on building out additional functionality that advances the formation of a National Digital Platform, through expanding the program’s scalability, usability, and feature set. Special Collections & University Archives will undertake this work with partners at University of California, Irvine, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Harvard University, and the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO). 

More information about ePADD, including links to the software, documentation, community forums, and the mailing list, can be found on the ePADD project website

For additional information, please contact the project team at, or follow the project on Twitter at @e_padd.

Franz Kunst

We are thrilled to announce that Franz Kunst has joined our Department as a Manuscripts Processing Archivist. Please join us in welcoming him to the fold.

This is not his first appearance in Special Collections as he has been at Stanford University since 2006, when he began working as an intern at the Hoover Institute on an assessment of their audio holdings for their Radio Free Europe collection. In 2007 he joined the Manuscripts Division in Special Collections and has worked for us and the Archives of Recorded Sound on many special projects over the past nine years. Some of these have been bulk processing projects which opened up over 80 undocumented collections in the Archives of Recorded Sound and several large collections in Special Collections, including: Douglas Engelbart, Donald McQuivey, Washington Apple Pi. Additionally Franz has completed several smaller collections: Karl Cohen, Tom Law poster collection, Fred Buenzle.

 Other notable projects are: the Riverwalk Jazz Project and the Educational Collections project where he processed several major collections, such as the papers of Ruth Asawa and Gyorgy Kepes. Franz has a B.A. from UNC, Chapel Hill in American Studies and Folklore and an MLIS from San Jose State University. 

GSB in China, 2002

The Stanford University Archives is pleased to announce that it has recently acquired, and made available, two collections from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Stanford University, Graduate School of Business, Records (SC1266)

Founded in 1925, The Stanford Graduate School of Business was formed in order to establish a West Coast alternative to the business schools of the East Coast.

Ralph Hansen, University Archivist, 1967

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of the Stanford University Archives. To celebrate, the Archives has launched a 50 day Twitter campaign featuring iconic images of Stanford. Follow us on Twitter @stanfordarchive or see all of the images posted thus far via #StanfordArchive50. This fall, the Archives will formally celebrate the anniversary with an exhibit in the East Wing of Green Library. Stay tuned for more information.

Aldine Greek Bible 1518

Stanford University Libraries is the grateful recipient of a very generous donation of some 700 individual leaves from early printed books, the gift of Donn Faber Downing and Letitia Leigh Sanders. The vast majority of these leaves are from books from the 15th and 16th centuries and serve not only as examples of which texts were being printed with this “new” technology (Gutenberg’s Bible was printed about 1455, the first book printed in the western world with moveable type) but also how these texts were presented: their typefaces, page layout, and format.  It is a remarkable, rich collection, and will be used in a wide variety of classes.

"Portraits of Success: Impressions of Silicon Valley Pioneers" (1986) book page image.

I am pleased to announce that all of the accessions in the Carolyn Caddes Papers (M0658) are now described and available for research.  For several years, only one accession was described online but thanks to Monika Lehman, our Public Services Intern, the rest of the accessions are open now for research.

Monika describes her experience processing this incredibly rich collection:

I had the opportunity to process Carolyn Caddes' papers. Carolyn is a portrait photographer who is most known for her collection of portraits published in a book entitled Portraits of Success: Impressions of Silicon Valley Pioneers (1986). Caddes spent years interviewing, photographing and researching the major players in Silicon Valley who worked in the technology sector, venture capitalism and government.

This project is a spin-off from the ongoing GAMECIP (Game Metadata and Citation Project) funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS).  We are planning to spin off and expand our work on controlled platform vocabularies with additional research and photography, then publish a definitive terminology and ontology for computer game platforms in a manner that will be useful for libraries, museums, collectors and scholars. We are beginning with the most used set as an initial set.

The two core components of the project are (1) review and photography of hardware in Stanford’s Stephen M. Cabrinety Collection in the History of Microcomputing, in order to complete our assessment and provide visual aids in the published terminology guide; and (2) collation, editing and design of platform and media description sheets that will be made available online and, eventually, be available for publication in a print format.