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Recording date on a Welte-Mignon roll label

How do you know a publication date? For most books, simply look for the copyright or edition information at the beginning. For mass produced modern CDs, check the edge of the disc surface for the “p date”, or maybe it will be in the booklet inserted into the container. But what about piano rolls for reproducing and player pianos? Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound’s Player Piano Project faces this question. The publication date certainly isn’t stamped on the label, yet we need it.

Theremin demonstrating his instrument, Stanford University, 1991

Earlier this year, I reported on recent work the Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) had undertaken to preserve video footage of Leon Theremin's visit to Stanford in 1991. In addition to participating in a symposium during his visit, hosted by the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), Theremin was also the guest of honor at a concert held in Frost Amphitheater on September 27, 1991 during the Stanford Centennial Finale Weekend. The video footage preserved by the ARS earlier in the year unfortunately only included part of this notable concert. It was found to be missing some key performances, including an arrangement of Rachmaninov's Vocalise, featuring Theremin's daughter Natasha Theremin playing the vocal parts on her father's instrument, accompanied by Max Mathews conducting the orchestral parts with his radio batons. This footage was presumed lost...until now. 

Mendeley logo

Good news! Stanford Libraries have upgraded the Stanford Mendeley Group account.

As a group member, you will now be able to take advantage of 25GB (5 GB personal and 20 GB shared) of storage and unlimited private groups with 25 users per group!

Other new features include the Mendeley Suggest tool as part of our group account and the new free android and iOS apps.

Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound just received its latest shipment of important material for the processing of the Player Piano Project: new boxes. To provide the best security and archival conditions (like temperature control!) for our piano rolls, they will be stored at SAL3, a high-density preservation facility in Livermore, California. Patrons interested in researching particular rolls will still have access, simply contact the Archive of Recorded Sound and we will request the rolls be shipped here for you to use.

Books in Terman Library

Welcome to Stanford and the School of Engineering. As you prepare to start your studies, the Engineering library has pulled together some helpful tips for getting started with doing research at Stanford.

The Terman Engineering Library has three Engineering Subject Specialists to answer your questions and help you get what you need for your projects and research. Please feel free to reach out to us.

Paddy Moloney and Seán Potts. cover of Tin Whistles.

The Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) has recently begun cataloging Irish folk music recordings donated by the family of Thomas Quilter. The collection features items representing a significant span of Irish and Irish-American music from the 1910s to the 1980s and a progression in performance practices leading up to and including the revival of Irish traditional folk music.

Chemistry of Fireworks

Swain Library News - 26 June 2015 (PDF)

  • CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 96th edition is available
  • Electrochemical Society Publications - Open Access Fee Waived for 2015
  • lynda.com - Online Video Training Library
  • American Society of Microbiology ebooks - Trial Access
  • Synthetic Reactions Updates
  • Pharmaceutical Substances version 3.8 released
  • RSC Historical Collection
  • Featured Books on the Chemistry of Fireworks

 

Terman Engineering Library stacks

During June and July, the Terman Engineering Library will continue to reduce the number of items on the shelves in the library in order to add additional student study space.  This project will include the transfer of approximately 4500 books to SAL3 and the removal of four ranges of shelving, a 40% reduction in shelving capacity.  After the move of collections, the library will have approximately 7000 items on the remaining four stack ranges.  The newly available floor space will allow for six new study tables and four new individual study carrels, a total of 28 additional seats, representing a 30% increase in seating capacity at the library. Mike Nack, project lead, has prepared a summary document.   The library will be open during the move of materials, although during the dismantling of the stacks currently scheduled for the second week of July, students may want to find a quieter location to study.

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