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Cover image of A party in Ramadan

A party in Ramandan is only one of the Children's books with an Islamic theme in Cubberley Education Library.  It deals with the dilemma of a young Muslim girl torn between the temptations of goodies at a party and wanting to keep her Ramadan fast.

Cover image of Not otherwise specified

June is LGBT Pride Month, honoring the 1969 Stonewall riots.  Check out the Library of Congress site for more information about it.  Also check out Cubberley Education Library's list of children's books with a LGBTQ theme and resources for research on LGBTQ and education.

Robert Schumann, Drei zweistimmige Lieder (detail)

Rare Music Materials at Stanford is a Spotlight instance that presents materials from the Stanford University Libraries' collections that have been digitized in response to research requests, or were produced for small projects. Items and their downloadable images may also be found in SearchWorks, Stanford's library catalog.

Franz Schubert

Overture zum 3. Akt, Die Zauberharfe, original manuscript by Franz Schubert (1797-1828); libretto by Georg von Hofmann.
Memorial Library of Music, MLM 948
[download images of this work]

Guest blogger: Benjamin Ory

Die Zauberharfe, or “The Magic Harp,” was a melodrama premiered on August 19, 1820 at the Theater an der Wien in Vienna. The original cast included Ferdinand Schimon (Palmerin, tenor), Karl Erdmann Rüger (Arnulf), Josefa Gottdank (Melinda), Frl. Botta (Ida), and Nikolaus Heurteur (Folko). There were seven repeat performances through October 12, before the work was subsequently withdrawn from the repertory. The majority of Hofmann’s text and some of the musical numbers were lost, and thus, no further staged performances were able to occur. The manuscript of the Act III Overture now resides in Stanford’s Memorial Library of Music.<--break->

Cover image of Maniac Magee

Hats off to Stanford’s own Andrew Luck for promoting the love of reading. Mr. Luck has started a book club via social media. He plans to introduce a book he enjoyed as a child for younger readers, as well as a book for more seasoned readers. According to his web site he’ll introduce a new book in stages that correspond with the NFL schedule: off-season, mini-camp, summer training and pre-season. He plans to bring in guest athletes to take over until after the Super Bowl. Participants may follow along on Facebook, Instagram and/or Twitter using #ALBookClub. More information about the book club may be found on his website.

The first selections for the book club are Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli and the Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown. Both titles can be found in Stanford University Libraries.

Colleagues who worked on the Rumsey Map Center Project

Today marks the end of our first week of the opening of the David Rumsey Map Center as a library and special collections center within Green. Between the opening and this week, we have had over 600 visitors and now that the excitement of the opening is behind us, I want to take this opportunity to thank you all for being instrumental in making this happen.

Charlotte Thai, Project Archivist for the Cabrinety Collection

In our final blog post for Preservation Week we’re talking with Charlotte Thai, Project Archivist in Special Collections on the Cabrinety-NIST Project. Digital preservation, a critical concern for modern archives, is supported by the Digital Library Systems and Services department and Special Collections. From born-digital access and preservation to digital reformatting across formats, it takes a small, technically-savvy village to care for our growing digital collections.

For more information about Preservation Week including resources, quick tips, and free webinars visit the American Library Association’s Preservation Week site. 

Geoff Willard, Stanford Media Preservation Lab

For today’s Preservation Week blog post we move away from book and paper preservation to meet Geoff Willard from the Stanford Media Preservation Lab (SMPL). SMPL serves to preserve and enhance access to original sound and moving image collection materials held by Stanford University Libraries.  Operations focus on creating a high-quality copy of the original content in a digital format that is easily accessed by researchers and others, and that enables ongoing, long-term management of the content for future users.

For more information about Preservation Week including resources, quick tips, and free webinars visit the American Library Association’s Preservation Week site. 

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