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Arpa players

Have you ever wanted to explore new music but perhaps needed some inspiration? Some site that wasn’t Top 40 radio?  Let me recommend Smithsonian Global Sound (access for Stanford students, faculty and staff). I recently looked for some traditional mariachi music--perfect for those warm summer days. A search for “mariachi” led me to over 20 albums of mariachi music and related genres.  I chose to play music of the conjunto de arpa grande (big harp ensemble), a “country cousin” of the mariachi ensemble.  These big harp ensembles consist of violins, guitars, and harp, without the trumpets so common to mariachi groups. The sones (sentimental songs) and valonas (poetic narratives) were sung with a wonderful directness and vocal flair.  The playing was rhythmic, tuneful, and celebratory.  Perfect!

Tomorrow, July 17th, at 7:30 PM, Professor James Cavallaro, Director, International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic, at Stanford, will speak on "Drone Warfare? Civilian Harms and the Legal, Strategic, and Ethical Challenges," at CEMEX Auditorium, Knight Management Center. He has done fieldwork on drone warfare in Pakistan, and has worked with Central American refugees and activists in Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. This lecture is part of a series sponsored by the Stanford Summer Human Rights Program. For more on drones in Stanford Libraries, search Drone aircraft in Searchworks.

Victoria Stodden, Assistant Professor of Statistics, Columbia University, speaks at the afternoon panel discussion.

With the explosive growth in scientific publishing, access to scientific research papers and data has become an increasingly complex affair. Stanford's Forum on the Future of Scientific Publishing on June 27 brought together a diverse group of stakeholders to exchange information about open access to manuscripts and big data.

The Forum was held in response to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memorandum directing expanded public access to the results of government-funded research.  The February 2013 memo requires federal agencies sponsoring more than $100 million in annual research expenditures "to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication... Such results include peer-reviewed publications and digital data." Furthermore, the memo states that data repositories could be maintained either by the federal government or “scholarly and professional associations, publishers and libraries.” The memo directed federal agencies to provide the OSTP with their draft policies by August 22.

Bill Morgan, biographer and personal archivist to Allen Ginsberg, will be speaking this Friday at the Stanford Humanities Center. Morgan, who coordinated the transfer of Ginberg’s archives to Stanford, will be in conversation with Stanford literary scholar Hilton Obenzinger. Morgan and Obenzinger will discuss the legacy of Ginsberg’s cultural contributions and the scope of the Ginsberg archives.

Several items of Ginsberg memorabilia will be on display, giving the public a rare opportunity to view items held in Stanford Libraries' Special Collections.

This event is part of The Allen Ginsberg Festival, and is being presented in conjunction with the Contemporary Jewish Museum exhibition Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg.

When: Friday, July 12, 2013, at 1:30 pm

Where: The Stanford Humanities Center, 424 Santa Teresa Street, Stanford, CA

Co-sponsored by the Contemporary Jewish Museum, Lehrhaus Judaica, Stanford Continuing Studies and the Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford.

Free and open to the public.

Abraham Tewolde

Following on from his first post a few weeks ago, our Stanford University Libraries 1st-generation intern Abraham Tewolde updates us on the work he has been doing recently at the Archive of Recorded Sound.  Be sure to watch out for further updates between now and the end of Abraham's internship in mid-August.

Did you know there were 56 signers to the Declaration of Independence? You can read more about them and other Independence Day facts in this Fourth of July Facts for Features from the United States Census Bureau.

Covers of two of the many fantasy titles in Cubberley Library.

Now that the brunt of the academic year is over Cubberley Library invites you to read something a little lighter. The library currently has a display of young adult fantasy books perfect for reading at the beach. If fantasy isn’t your thing we also have a wide variety of other genres as well. So even if you no longer quite fit in the Y category and are a lot more A you might still find something enjoyable to read. We’ll be more than happy to point you in the direction of our curriculum collection where these items are housed.

 

In May, the creators of a new, unique data mining tool -- Enigma -- made a presentation to a group of Political Science Department graduate students. It would be safe to say that the demonstration generated some real interest and excitement. Based in great part on that response from students in the department, the Library has now arranged a long-term beta-test with Enigma for the entire Stanford community. The only other academic institution with this arrangement is the Harvard Business School.

Enigma has ingested, and continues to ingest, digitized public records from the federal government, state governments, international organizations, and from some non-U.S. governments. They began amassing data by making a FOIA request for all U.S. government domain names and then scraped and ingested all of the data available on those sites. They continue to ingest new data every week.

Enigma is very interested in engaging with Stanford scholars to get ideas for additional digital data sets to include in their database. In other words, they really want to hear from you about data that might be valuable to your research. So, as you use Enigma, please take advantage of the Chat function to make suggestions/requests. One caveat -- Enigma does not digitize data. However, they are pretty inventive in finding ways to obtain digital data that should be in the public domain. For example, they take in U.S Customs Service data regarding all containers that pass through U.S. ports. This data is only made available by the Customs Service on CD's, which Enigma uploads on a weekly basis.

Enigma can be accessed by all members of the Stanford community through this link:

http://ezproxy.stanford.edu/login?url=https://app.enigma.io

Here is Enigma's own description of what they are trying to accomplish:

Enigma is a search and discovery platform for big public data that exposes billions of public records across previously siloed datasets. Petabytes of pubic data are created by governments, companies, and independent institutions each year. However, as many of us know, it is tedious (if not impossible in some cases) to navigate and discover connections across these disconnected resources. Enigma empowers its users to search and manipulate these hidden datasets, creating priceless information needed to gain an edge and uncover a universe of untapped knowledge. Whether you are searching for people, companies, places, social, political, and economic trends, or broader topics, Enigma offers depth and resolution into these pools of data that are currently unavailable or underutilized by traditional search portals like Google, Yahoo, and Bing.

Let us know what you think of this new and powerful statistical tool.

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