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Stanford University Press will hold an overstock book sale, today, Tuesday, June 4 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. There will be lots of books to browse and buy. Paperbacks will sell for $5; cloth bound for $10. The sale takes place at Koret Park, between Green and Meyer libraries.

New York Times, June 1913

May 29, 2013 marks the centennial of one of the most storied premieres in modern history; namely, that of the ballet, Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris. The music was composed by Igor Stravinsky, with choreography by Vaslav Nijinsky, performed by Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes; the orchestra was conducted by Pierre Monteux.

Today marks 100 years to the day since the infamous first performance of Igor Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) at the Théâtre des Champs‐Elysées in Paris on 29 May 1913. The 31-year-old composer's two-part ballet score, coupled with 24-year-old Vaclav Nijinsky's choreography, provoked a riot on the opening night that according to most accounts rendered the music inaudible for most of the performance. The protests were so loud that Ballet Russes Director, Serge Diaghilev, was supposedly forced to shout instructions to his dancers onstage while flashing the auditorium's house lights in an attempt to quell the enraged audience. 

On last Friday's show, Rachel Maddow admitted to being a "total dork" about the Oxford English Dictionary. She closed the show with a piece -- titled "Refer Madness" which made me chuckle :-) -- about a bibliographic mystery currently stumping OED staff. In checking their citations, they've come across 51 definitions -- including "Fringy," "Chapelled," "Scavage," and "Whinge" -- in which the first cited reference for those words is in a book entitled "Meanderings of Memory" by Nightlark. The problem is that nobody at OED can actually find the book. I looked quickly in our Searchworks catalog, and in Worldcat to no avail.

So they're appealing for help from the public in hunting down this book. Check out the comments to the OED story to see how far the public has gotten. There's much more to the story in this New Yorker article "Have you seen this book? an OED mystery" by Sasha Weiss. Can you help?

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

3D Printer at Stanford Law School Event

Yesterday's panel discussion at Stanford Law School on 3D printing aroused more questions than it answered, especially given the diverse perspectives, assumptions, interests and even misunderstanding among the general public and within professional circles regarding what it is, it's wider implications and who, when and where (if found necessary) should regulate it. Legal issues stemming from product liability in cases of injury, copyright and patent infringement, as well as freedom and protections accorded to manufacturers, sellers and user were discussed. Similarities were drawn between the advent of the internet and the current 3D printing movement

Do you have ideas for a fun library event that can spread the word that the library is here to help students with research? If so, please sign up for a focus group and get a $10 Coupa Café gift card. The focus groups will be meeting from 4:00 to 5:00 pm on:
 
  • Tuesday, May 21
  • Wednesday, May 22
  • Thursday, May 23

Write to felicias@stanford.edu to sign up.

 

SearchWorks has just crossed a threshold: when you check the catalog, you're now looking at records for more than seven million library resources!

Google Chrome icon

Chromebooks are low-cost, ultra-portable, secure, fast, "web-based" computing devices running ChromeOS, a complete operating system based on the Google Chrome web browser. They are optimized for Google Apps and off-line saving and editing of your Google Docs.

Samsung Chromebooks are now available for 7-day loan at the Terman Engineering Library!

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