Stanford Libraries Blog

Cover of Say something!

Say something!

May 2, 2019
by Kathryn M Kerns

"Your voice can inspire, heal, and transform.  Your voice can change the world."  Peter H. Reynold's latest children's book Say something urges everyone to use their voice, creativity, and courage to change the world for the better.

Image of railroad workers on the Tanzania Zambia railroad, circa 1971-1972

Open House on Trains and Railroads on May 10th, 2019


Friday, May 10th, marks the sesquicentennial of the Golden Spike, the ceremonial completion of the first transcontinental railroad. In honor of the occasion, curators Eitan Kensky, Kathleen Smith, and Ben Stone are organizing an Open House in Green Library from 11:00am to 3:00pm. In addition to material documenting the American transcontinental railroad and railroads in the United States, this event highlights stories of other significant trains and transportation networks around the world.

Inquisition document image

Inquisition documents and other new medieval and early modern acquisitions on display May 3rd

April 30, 2019
by Kathleen M Smith

On Friday, May 3rd, 2019, there will be an Open House in the Barchas Room of Green Library featuring recent acquisitions in medieval and early modern manuscripts, printed books, and other new materials. One of the new items on display will be a collection of rare handwritten documents from fifteenth-century Bologna, a main center of Inquisition activity in Italy, related to trials and investigations involving Jews--which is unusual since the Inquisition in Italy focused more on combating Christian heresy.

Cover of The lost words : a spell book

The lost words: a spell book

April 25, 2019
by Kelly L Roll

“Once upon a time, words began to vanish from the language of children. They disappeared so quietly that at first no one noticed – fading away like water on stone.” Thus begins The lost words: a spell book by Robert MacFarlane. In 2007 a sharp-eyed reader noticed that approximately 40 words concerning nature had been dropped from the Oxford Junior Dictionary. Evidently they were no longer being used enough by children to merit a place in the dictionary.

Celebrating Preservation Week 2019

April 22, 2019
by Annie Matthys

This week (April 21 - April 27, 2019) is Preservation Week, a week devoted to, “…highlight[ing] what we can do, individually and together, to preserve our personal and shared collections” (American Library Association).

What are you reading right now?

World Book Day - What are you reading right now?

April 19, 2019
by Kimberly R. Kay

April 23, 2019 is World Book Day, which according to UNESCO is "a celebration to promote the enjoyment of books and reading." In that spirit, Daniel Hartwig (University Archivist) and Astrid Johannah Smith (Rare Book and Special Collections Digitization Specialist) asked some of our local book aficionados, "What are you reading right now?" and perhaps more important, "Why?" Their answers range: academic, self-improvement, romantic, and sometimes just for fun!

John Mustain

On retirement: an interview with John Mustain

April 17, 2019
by David A Jordan

Curator of Rare Books and Classics John Mustain’s work at Stanford Libraries spans the years 1978-2019.  To put into perspective his lasting influence on the collections and his beneficial impact on generations of scholars, simply consider the fact that his tenure coincides with fully forty percent of the Green Library Centennial period that we are celebrating this year.  In this interview, John looks back on his career and ahead to his retirement.  Like many of us who are fortunate to work at Stanford Libraries, his retirement plans include reading extensively an

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