Blog topic: Events

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Outdoor library instruction workshops

April 23, 2015
by Felicia Smith

“I never teach my pupils, I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.”
Albert Einstein

Stanford University’s Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) offers classes that guide students in developing analytical and research-based argument skills. Students take PWR 2 classes in their second year to continue building the aforementioned skills. PWR 2 consists of research projects that allow students to research, write, translate, and deliver an in-depth investigation.

California, Palo Alto Sheet

The Stanford Geological Survey Exhibit at Branner Library

April 16, 2015
by Julie Sweetkind-Singer

From the very start of Stanford University, geology students were sent into the field to learn mapping.  John Casper Branner and John Flesher Newsom taught field mapping to budding geologists first on the campus and then in the Santa Cruz mountains.  In 1903, an official course was inaugurated called, "Field Geology," taught by geology and mining professors Dr. Branner and Dr. Newsom.  Summer field trips took place every year until 1987.  Students mapped areas such as Mt. Hamilton (San Jose), the Sonoma Range, the Summit King Mine, the Santa Lucia Mountains, and the Snake Range in Nevada. 

The current exhibit at the library includes a map from 1895 by R.B. Marshall covering all of the Stanford lands and out into the marshy Bay, Thomas Dibblee's field notebook from 1932 when he was still in high school, Mary Balch's report on the geology of the New Almaden quadrangle from 1929, the expense account ledger from 1937 showing the expenditures for the season, and more.  

Conference on rare primary sources will be held in East Asia Library

April 15, 2015

On July 1-2, 2015, the East Asia Library of Stanford University Libraries will host an academic conference titled Beyond the Book: A Conference on Unique and Rare Primary Sources for East Asian Studies Collected in North America. The conference will bring librarians, archivists, and scholars from all over North America to present research papers on less-known materials, mostly in non-book formats. It is our hope that, through the conference, we will draw scholarly attention to those scattered yet valuable resources for East Asian Studies.

Amazing Library Race

Amazing "Library Titles" Race for library instruction

April 9, 2015
by Felicia Smith

“The Ass is Dead! Long Live the Ass!”

Do I have your attention?

Good. That is the point of a library instruction workshop game that requires students to unscramble a book title, search the catalog to find its location, and retrieve it from the shelves. “The Rebellion of The Beasts: Or, the Ass is Dead! Long Live the Ass!” is a sample title.

Stanford University Libraries (SUL) supports the Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) by offering library instruction workshops that include a walking tour of the library as well as an introduction to library resources. These library workshops are designed to support PWR’s objective to guide students in developing analytical and research-based argument skills. The library workshops are usually just a one-shot class that lasts 1 hour and 50 minutes; this is the duration of most classes.

Picture of student instructor library staff zombie battle xBox

Zombie Battle & PWR office hours in Green Library

April 3, 2015
by Felicia Smith

Friday April 3, 2015
Media Center, Green Library
PWR Instructor: Kathleen Tarr
Assigned Class Librarian: Felicia Smith

Green Library recently hosted Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) office hours for a Zombie Tournament in the Media Center to build relationships between students, instructors and librarians. This particular session had a stress relief component and was a fun way to introduce students to Green Library’s media resources. It allowed students to get help with their PWR assignment from their instructor, in a fun atmosphere. It also allowed students to meet librarians in a relaxed setting and build rapport. Hopefully, this will reduce any anxiety when approaching librarians for assistance at the Information Center Desk.

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Data Day 2015 Live via BlueJeans

April 3, 2015
by Amy E. Hodge

We are pleased to announce that Data Day 2015 will be made available live via BlueJeans!

On the morning of the event, click here to authenticate into BlueJeans using your SUNet ID. This service is only available to individuals with a Stanford ID. Up to 100 people will be able to watch the event from 8:30am to 1:00pm. First come, first served!

Nearly 250 people signed up within 48 hours of the announcement of the event, which will take place April 13, 2015 at the Li Ka Shing Conference Center at Stanford.

"Do you think a woman could study geology at Stanford?"

April 3, 2015
by Julie Sweetkind-Singer

Women have been involved in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences from the early days of the university.  In the beginning a few intrepid women navigated their way through an environment not designed for them.  They were not allowed in the field with the men and were sometimes treated poorly as they competed for lucrative jobs with their male counterparts.  Over the years, these women pioneers became part of the faculty, department chairs, and finally the Dean.  The population of women in the School has grown to where they are now 61% of the undergraduate population and 42% of the graduate students.

As part of the 100 days to 100 years: Branner Earth Sciences Library Celebration, we celebrate these pioneering women who were trailblazers, who literally and figuratively broke new ground in the field.  You may see items related to each of these women on display in the Branner Library exhibit case on the 2nd floor of the Mitchell Earth Sciences Building.

  • Lou Henry Hoover (B.A. Geology, 1898): the first woman to major in geology at Stanford.
  • Mary Balch Kennedy (B.A. Geology, 1929): an early student in the geology program.
  • Dr. A. Myra Keen (B.A., Ph.D. Psychology, 1934): the first woman faculty member and a professor of paleontology.
  • Dr. Gail Mahood (A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Geology, 1980): the first woman to be named department chair in the School.
  • Dr. Elizabeth Miller (B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Geology and Geophysics, 1977): the first woman run the Stanford Geological Survey.
  • Dr. Pamela Matson (B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Forest Ecology, 1983): the first woman to be named Dean of the School.

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