You are here




Continuing the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Stanford University Archives, the Archives is pleased to announce the opening of an exhibit, on view in Green Library's East Wing Lobby until October 25, 2015, shedding light on the origin and development of the Archives, as well as showcasing several treasures, including founding documents, a handle from the original Stanford Axe, and the ceremonial sword and scabbard of early Trustee, and founder of Palo Alto, Timothy Hopkins.

Sylvan Bar, Valley of Yosemite

October 1, 2015, marks the 125th anniversary of the establishment of Yosemite National Park. To commemorate our nation’s third National Park, the University Archives has mounted an exhibition of photographs of Yosemite Valley taken by Eadweard Muybridge in 1872. On display are ten albumen photographs printed from replicated negatives made from photographs by Muybridge in 1872. This set of images comes from a limited edition printed by the Chicago Albumen Works, Inc. and published by Yosemite Natural History Association in 1977. Only 50 sets were produced. To read more about this amazing series of photographs follow this link. To view additional Muybridge photographs held by the Stanford University Libraries follow this link.

The photographs are on display in Green Library, 2nd Floor, near the Human Resources office (241) located near the middle of the Bing and East Wings. Viewing hours are Monday-Friday from 8AM to 5PM.

Joseph Goldyne exhibit poster, Stanford University Libraries
A new exhibition on the second floor of the Green Library Bing Wing features the work of artist Joseph Goldyne, whose unique small-format prints using intaglio printmaking processes are credited with reviving the art of the varied edition monoprint beginning in the late 1970s. After earning a medical degree at UCSF (1968), Goldyne turned his full attention to art and never looked back. His work is informed by his study and documentation of human anatomy as well as his near-encyclopedic knowledge of art history, credentialed by a graduate degree in fine arts from Harvard.
Mendelssohn. Sechs Lieder. Breitkopf, ca. 1846 (detail)

A sampling of printed music covers in the Music Library exhibit cases celebrates the art of lithography, providing examples of decorative frames and borders as well as scenes depicting various subjects. The nineteenth century saw a shift in music printing methods from engraving to lithography, a technique which allowed for increasingly fine decorative detail as is reflected in the covers on display. Artistic renderings of pictorial scenes, fanciful borders, and varieties of fonts helped attract buyers; advertised the skills of the artist; and, when prominently displayed on the parlor piano, evidenced the refined taste of the household.

Branner Geological Library bookplate

The Stanford University Archives is pleased to announce a one-week exhibit of materials relating to John Casper Branner and the Branner Library. This exhibit will be on display at Branner Earth Sciences Library from June 5-12.

Items on display include photographs and other materials relating to Branner’s inauguration; photographs of Branner and family, including some taken on the Stanford campus with Thomas Edison; and materials documenting the founding of Branner Library.

This exhibit is part of the anniversary celebration commemorating the 100th year since the founding of the Branner Earth Sciences Library & Map Collections (June 14, 1915 - June 14, 2015). It is part of an ongoing series of anniversary events that culminates with a public celebration, speakers, and tour of the library on Thursday, June 11, 2015 from 4-6:30 pm.

For more information about John Casper Branner, or about any of the collection materials included in this exhibit, please contact the University Archives at 

Maps of war take many forms from those showing battlefronts to the layout of trenches, from details of terrain to focusing on the forts that protect a harbor.  One category of war map is designed to inform the people at home or soldiers as to what is or has happened during a campaign.  This week we feature three maps from the Branner Library collection that focus on World War II and the battles in the Pacific.  This exhibit is part of the Branner 100th Anniversary celebration and will be on display May 28 - June 4, 2015 at the Branner Earth Sciences Library and Map Collections.

Between 1942 and 1946 the U.S. Army Information Branch issued weekly broadsheets called Newsmap that were targeted specifically for American military personnel to keep up on the progress of the war.  The broadsheets are large, measuring 3 feet by 4 feet and are printed on both sides.  They include maps, photographs, news, and the progress on each front.  224 Newsmaps were printed and Branner Library holds about 50 of them.  You may read more about these maps in a blog post written by Mike DiCianna, a student at Oregon State University.  The University of North Texas has scanned 212 of the maps and you may view them here.  The map on display is from October 13, 1943 and includes a map of Europe for context and the world colored according to military alliances.  At the bottom left three pictures show a time lapse of the bombing of a few flats in a river. 


Garvin Mine, Arkansas

You know you've made people mad when they hang you in effigy.

Before John Casper Branner came to Stanford, he spent several years as the State Geologist of Arkansas. In 1887-1888, he and his team completed the second-ever geological survey in Arkansas -- and the first in 30 years. Residents of the state were intent on having Branner verify the various reports of gold in the area; companies were busy making money off prospectors willing to buy up gold stock that promised riches and wealth.

This week's Branner 100 exhibit tells the story of the Second Arkansas Geological Survey.

This exhibition honors faculty research from the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences. Many of the papers highlighted in this exhibition are seminal works in the fields of energy, environmental sciences and climate change, and geologic and geophysical research.

Ever wondered what the most checked out books by Stanford authors were at Branner Library? So did we. Included in the exhibit are two such titles that are frequently used: Introduction to Geochemistry by Prof. Dennis Bird and Reservoir Geomechanics by Prof. Mark Zoback. Other notable titles are more recent, such as books authored by Dean Pam Matson and Prof. Rosamond Naylor.

A sampling of faculty titles on display at Branner Library.