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Exhibits

The Archive of Recorded Sound recently collaborated with the Bing Stanford in Washington program to provide digitized images from the Archive's Grover Sales Collection (ARS.0016) for an evening event at the program in late January which served to launch both a new arts track at Bing Stanford in Washington, and provide students from both Stanford and nearby Duke Ellington School of the Arts with an insight into the role jazz played in African American history and civil rights through the early to middle part of the 20th century.  The event  featured a display of enlarged wall mounted images of Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, and Ethel Waters, sourced from the Grover Sales Collection, digitized from 35mm negative slides. Grover Sales (1920-2004), a Bay Area author, jazz critic, and teacher, who regularly taught jazz history here at Stanford, amassed the image portion of his collection from various sources for use during his classes.  

A new exhibition has just opened at the Stanford Music Library entitled Treasures from the Archive of Recorded Sound, on show through August 14. The exhibition was curated and installed by the Archive of Recorded Sound's Interim Operations Manager, Benjamin Bates, who describes the content and theme of the exhibit in more detail. 

Stockhausen's Helikopter Quartet (detail), showing parts for instrumentalists and helicopter operators.

The Winter Quarter exhibit in the Music Library features six string quartet scores. Two are fairly traditional examples (Boccherini and Mozart), and four are contemporary scores, notable for the imaginative treatments they provide (Crumb, Ferneyhough, Brown, and Stockhausen). QR codes link to audio files for each work.

San Francisco from the David Rumsey Map Collection: SFO Airport Exhibit

The new exhibit installed at the San Francisco International Airport Museum, comes from the David Rumsey Map Collection, with a few items from Stanford University Libraries and the San Francisco Public Library.  Exhibited in a magnificent space, these iconic set of maps are at the airport exhibition gallery in Terminal 2 (Virgin America and American Airlines). The exhibit is accessible after going through security. The exhibit combines the original maps with digital representations and includes videos and Google Earth overlays.

For more on the exhibit, see their press release.

Check out what Wired has to say about it! Also David himself has blogged about it.

The exhibit is currently open and will remain so until August 3, 2014. If you cannot make it, check out a selection showcased in the digital gallery. You can also browse them in detail at davidrumsey.com.

Many thanks to my colleagues at Branner, Preservation and Special Collections for supporting this exhibit.

 
Delineatio Omnium Orarum Totius Australis Partis Americae, Dictae Peruvianae, a R. de la Plata, Brasiliam, Pariam, & Castellam . . ..

We were recently approached by Blair Hedges, a professor of Biology at Pennsylvania State University, who requested high resolution files for over 200 maps depicting the Caribbean that were part of the Barry L Ruderman Collection for his Caribmap website.  "Caribmap is a mobile-friendly resource for exploring historical map images of Caribbean islands. The site has evolved since 1999 and now presents images of approximately 1800 maps of the islands printed over five centuries (16th–20th). This is still a small sampling of the thousands of different maps that were printed." The site includes links to resources and a bibliography.

You can see the Stanford-contributed maps here, and visit caribmap.org to view other maps of the Caribbean; you can also look at the Barry L. Ruderman Collection in more detail and browse for other maps from that collection.

We are pleased to have the maps featured on caribmap.org! Many thanks to the staff at Branner and DLSS, especially Deardra Fuzzell, Bess Sadler and Cathy Aster for their efforts in being able to use systematic methods to provide high resolution images to caribmap.org.



Wagner display in the Music Library

Wagner in his century

2013 marks the 200th birthday of musical giant Richard Wagner. In commemoration, the Music Library offers on display a selection of 19th century items related to Wagner, including an 1860 edition of the overture to Rienzi, his first successful opera; the sheet music for “Les deux grenadiers” (1843), an early song Wagner published in the hope of making a name for himself in Paris (he failed); the dedication page for the score of the Ring cycle (1875), which salutes Wagner’s champion King Ludwig II of Bavaria; and Richard Wagner's Lohengrin und Tannhäuser (1852), by Franz Liszt, commentaries on Wagner’s “système dramatique”, his approach to composition in which the interplay of words and music supports a deeper quality of expression in service to the drama. Through December .

Stanford Safari students pose with Daniel Hartwig, University Archivist

The University Archives was pleased once again to participate in professor Bob Siegel's sophomore college class, "The Stanford Safari." Students learned about the purpose and scope of the Archives' operations and viewed select items from the University's history (yes, that's Leland Stanford's death mask).