Blog topic: Exhibits

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Beautiful books: new Spotlight exhibit showcases rare and antiquarian books

January 15, 2019
by Ann K.D. Myers

A new online exhibit, Beautiful Books: A collection of some of Stanford's rare and antiquarian books, highlights Special Collections' efforts to digitize books with unique or noteworthy features. It includes fine examples of engraved and woodcut illustrations, astronomical diagrams, typographical innovation, fine bindings, and more. The books are artifacts of multiple points throughout history, from the earliest printing in the late 1400's to the 20th century.

title poster for Scholars Select exhibit

Scholars Select exhibit for Green Library's centennial celebrates community of scholars

January 7, 2019
by Elizabeth A Fischbach

Stanford’s Main Library, known today as the Green Library Bing Wing, is one-hundred years old this year. Scholars Select: Special Collections in Action, an exhibit of books, manuscripts, and objects chosen by faculty who make frequent use of the collections will be on display in the Bing Wing January 24 — April 14, 2019. It is the first in a series of events planned as part of a yearlong “Green Library Beyond 100” celebration. The exhibit opening reception will be held on Thursday, January 24, from 4:00 to 6:00 pm in Green Library's Munger Rotunda.

Becoming Stanford: New Spotlight at Stanford exhibit explores the history and meaning of Stanford's Insignia

January 7, 2019
by Josh Schneider

Have you ever wondered why Stanford is represented by the color cardinal, and not the original choice of gold? Or why the university's motto is in German?

We are pleased to announce a new Spotlight at Stanford exhibit focused on the development of Stanford's insignia: Becoming Stanford: The History and Meaning of the University’s Insignia.

Mission Beach Amusement Park

Sanborn fire insurance map collection online

December 4, 2018
by Julie Sweetkind-Singer

Sanborn maps are a favorite of any map librarian.  What's not to like about them?  They give us a view into the history of our country in a way that few other maps do.  They show the growth and decline of towns and cities.  They track the changing use of buildings over time.  At times they tell us who lived and worked in specific areas.  We peek into the past to understand what kept people entertained, be it an amusement park, a skating rink, a movie theater, or a bar.  The Sanborn Fire Insurance Company began producing these maps in the late 19th century for towns and cities throughout the United States in order to provide information to insurers about the composition and use of buildings to allow for the correct underwriting of policies.  The maps include: building footprints; building material shown by color, height and number of stories; uses such as dwellings, hotels, churches, and chicken coops; street widths, water pipes, hydrants, and cisterns.  This provides historians, genealogists, urban planners, and ethnologist with a wealth of information about the nation's past.  

Title graphic "For France!"

For France! Stanford men and women in World War I

November 9, 2018
by Elizabeth A Fischbach

Sunday November 11, 2018, Veterans Day, marks the 100th anniversary of the unofficial end of World War I. Although the actual peace treaty wasn’t signed until later, November 11, 1918 — at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month — is when a truce, known as the Armistice, was signed and the fighting stopped. In commemoration, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives presents an exhibit of WWI-related materials drawn from the University Archives’ War Records and other sources.

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