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Fun facts

A student enjoys one of the comfortable chairs in the Lane Reading Room

Have you been looking for just the right spot to study for your finals? Looking for a comfy, quiet place for just you and your laptop, perhaps a large room equipped with whiteboards and/or audiovisual equipment for your study group, or maybe an area with soft seating and an amazing view of the campus?

Are you busier than you have been all year? 
Are you cranky and sleep-deprived?

That can only mean one thing. Finals week and the end of the quarter are quickly approaching. Students are preparing to complete all their projects and stay awake as long as it takes. 

So if you are feeling overworked, and under-caffeinated or just not being fully appreciated, Stanford University Libraries can help. We have people and material that are available to assist with your information needs.

Here are a few tips that may be useful:

  1. If you need help with assignments, please contact the Information Center.
  2. There are lots of places to study.
  3. To help you unwind, please check out video games and movies in the Media & Microtext Center.
  4. If you want to read a fun book, we have plenty, including a Graphic Novels display (see image) by the Information Center (IC) Desk.
  5. We also have jigsaw puzzles and legos located, near the IC Desk as well.

There are a lot of general study tips resources available from the University.

There are also peer counseling services available everyday, all day.

Free-range logo

“I never teach my pupils, I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.”
Albert Einstein

Stanford University’s Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) offers classes that guide students in developing analytical and research-based argument skills. Students take PWR 2 classes in their second year to continue building the aforementioned skills. PWR 2 consists of research projects that allow students to research, write, translate, and deliver an in-depth investigation.

(CC BY-SA 2.0)

Legislation!  It's what establishes the position of Poet Laureate!

Happy National Poetry Month!

Amazing "Library Titles" Race for library instruction

“The Ass is Dead! Long Live the Ass!”

Do I have your attention?

Good. That is the point of a library instruction workshop game that requires students to unscramble a book title, search the catalog to find its location, and retrieve it from the shelves. “The Rebellion of The Beasts: Or, the Ass is Dead! Long Live the Ass!” is a sample title.

Stanford University Libraries (SUL) supports the Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) by offering library instruction workshops that include a walking tour of the library as well as an introduction to library resources. These library workshops are designed to support PWR’s objective to guide students in developing analytical and research-based argument skills. The library workshops are usually just a one-shot class that lasts 1 hour and 50 minutes; this is the duration of most classes.

Music note

A copy of the Sherman & Hyde Musical Review (San Francisco, 1874) came across my desk and I happened upon this "artikel" written in tongue-and-cheek defense of the shape-note singing technique (aka, "skuare notes"), which was apparently looked down on by 'properly trained' musicians--"Round Heds", who read music with the standard round-head notation. The Music Library has a number of of shape-note singing primers, which were the subject of a 2012 exhibit on Early American Tune Books. Several titles have been digitized; see The Easy Instructor for examples of shape-note notation.

Thomas Edison listening to a wax cylinder, 1888

About two months ago, I accidentally wandered into an antique shop in Fairfax, California. Inside there was a seemingly random arrangement of kipple which the shopkeeper clearly understood. It was as if I had discovered a surreptitious vault in an Indiana Jones movie filled with gleaming mounds of treasure, a glut of pearls and gold, a feast for the eyes*. I hesitated, unsure of where to start, slightly concerned that something would fall on me.

Happy Birthday to Aldous Huxley, born July 26, 1894!

“There are things known and there are things unknown and in between are the doors of perception.”
-Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley is widely known as the author of Brave New World, The Doors of Perception, and Island. Did you know he was also the grandson of scientist Thomas Henry Huxley, a Hollywood screenwriter who wrote the screenplay for Pride and Prejudice (1940), lectured on the “Human Potential” at The Esalen Institute in the 1960’s, and was once Eric Arthur Blair’s French teacher at Eton College before Eric went on to write 1984 and Animal Farm with the pen name George Orwell?

Special Collections at Stanford University Libraries has a sketchbook, which Huxley used when he was 17 years old. Dated March 7-July 6, 1912, it is possible that Huxley brought the sketchbook along with him during his travels through Marburg, Germany before attending Oxford University in the fall of 1913.