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Blog topic: Geospatial

San Francisco Fountain detail by Joe Thompson

Asawa Photos of San Francisco on Historypin

April 2, 2015
by Franz Kunst

As previously announced, the Ruth Asawa papers are now available. In thinking of fun and innovative ways to present certain aspects of her work, we decided to scan a small series of San Francisco architecture snapshots from her collection and upload them to the social mapping website Historypin, and also include them in their Year of the Bay local history project.  These photographs were probably used as research in creating the San Francisco Fountain in Union Square, which features many cast dough relief images of the city. Unfortunately there is no information on or about the prints in the collection. They are likely all from the 1960s, and were probably taken by Asawa (she has referred to taking pictures of the city in preparation). Architectural historian Sally Woodbridge may have also contributed. The varying qualities of the prints implies that several cameras or developers were used, and that they were probably taken over a period of time. At any rate, they collectively serve as a remarkable portrait of the city in that decade.

Using the ID Editor to map Kendua, Bangladesh

Stanford Geospatial Center helps use “The Crowd” to reduce childhood cholera mortality

February 17, 2015
by Mr. Stace D Maples

Stanford University Pediatric Global Health Physician/Scientist Eric Nelson is using mapping apps to do something unexpected. Using the widely adopted Android mobile platform, Nelson is working with a diverse team of programmers and researchers, including the Stanford Geospatial Center and the Stanford Computer Science Department, to develop an application geared to assessing and providing guidance on treatment of diarrheal disease. The technology is being built and tested so that it will also have applicability in other outbreaks situations like Ebola. The project is funded by the NIH and, in partnership with the Ministry of Health of Bangladesh, Nelson is undertaking a study in Kendua, Bangladesh, to leverage mobile technology in overcoming these challenges.
In an NIH funded project, and in partnership with the Ministry of Health of Bangladesh, Stanford University Pediatric Global Health Physician/Scientist, Eric Nelson is undertaking a study in Kendua, Bangladesh, to leverage mobile technology in overcoming these challenges. Using the widely adopted Android mobile platform, Nelson is working with a diverse team of programmers and researchers, including the Stanford Geospatial Center and the Stanford Computer Science Department, to develop an application geared to assessing and providing guidance on treatment of diarrheal disease. The technology is being built and tested so that it will also have applicability in other outbreaks situations, like Ebola.

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