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Hydra

Mark Matienzo

We are pleased to announce that Mark Matienzo is joining  Stanford Libraries as of September 19, 2016 as our Collaboration & Interoperability Architect. Mark will be joining Stanford from DPLA (the Digital Public Library of America) where he currently serves as the Director of Technology. He has previously worked  as an archivist, a digital library software developer, and the technical architect for the ArchivesSpace project, at institutions including DPLA, the Yale University Library, and The New York Public Library.

His background and skills in IT systems, data modeling, and community building across libraries, archives and museums (LAMs) make him uniquely qualified and well suited for this position. The Collaboration & Interoperability Architect is a key role. It promotes convergence and interoperable approaches to digital information management among LAMs. This ranges from helping arrange joint projects, to fostering and broadening collaborations on successful open source software efforts; from identifying better data models that work across sectors, to advancing interoperability via initiatives like IIIF, the International Image Interoperability Framework.

With funding support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this role was created with the recognition that LAMs are at a critical stage of adapting to the digital world, that they have common needs and opportunities, and through cross-pollinating ideas and efforts early and often, they can converge on common approaches—like  IIIF—where the whole is greater than the sum the parts. 

Stanford has deliberately pursued collaboration and interoperability as a key strategy for its digital library efforts. Many hands working in concert produces access to more information, richer services, faster innovation and more sustainable systems. As we say in the Hydra Project, “if you want to go far, go together.” 

There is no shortage of collaboration opportunities on the horizon. We anticipate that Mark will be engaged in efforts drawing on IIIF, linked data, cross-LAM data models and Web archiving. He will also no doubt have a hand in helping extend and broaden some of the most adaptable open source technologies in this space including Hydra, Fedora and Blacklight in its many forms (including ArcLight, Spotlight and GeoBlacklight). 

Salmon data in EarthWorks

Stanford University Libraries is happy to introduce EarthWorks, our new geospatial data discovery application. EarthWorks is a discovery tool for geospatial (a.k.a. GIS) data. It allows users to search and browse the GIS collections owned by Stanford University Libraries, as well as data collections from many other institutions. Data can be searched spatially, by manipulating a map; by keyword search; by selecting search limiting facets (e.g., limit to a given format type); or by combining these options.

This week, while things were otherwise quiet at Stanford due to Spring Break, 35 technologists from 20 institutions* descended upon Stanford for our annual library developers' (un)conference: LibDevConX, hosted by SUL's Digital Library Systems & Services group. For the fourth year in a row, the event brought together some of the best and brightest technical experts from different places with like concerns, to explore needs, common solutions, and learn from each others' innovations. This year, topics included: 

  • comparing media and digital asset management solutions
  • the latest features in Hydra 6
  • exploring Hydra-not-on-Fedora
  • what it would take to replace DSpace with a Hydra head
  • requirements for a robust digital exhibits engine
  • image interoperability
  • effective approaches to testing web front-ends
  • performance tuning for Ruby on Rails apps
  • successful recipes for devOps

The event site is online at http://lib.stanford.edu/ldcx4, and notes are being posted in GitHub at https://github.com/ldcx/ldcx-2013 Work on some of the many ideas generated at the event has already begun, and will be coming to a digital library system near you in the coming quarters. 

 

*CDL, Cornell, Columbia, Digital Curation Experts, the Danish Royal Library, Danish Technical University, Duke, the Getty Research Institute, Harvard, Indiana University, MIT, Notre Dame, NYU, Oregon State, Penn State, Princeton, the Southern California Chinese American Society, University of Virginia, and WGBH