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Mario Paci

On October 14, the exhibit, “Mario Paci and Music Culture in Shanghai: A Special Exhibition in Commemoration of Mario Paci,” opened at Shanghai Symphony Hall to commemorate 70 years since the death of the Symphony’s revered founding conductor. The exhibit is a collaborative project between the Stanford University Libraries, the Shanghai Conservatory of Music, and the Shanghai Symphony Orchestra.

500 Broadway lobby

It's time to follow up to our original September blog post announcing our upcoming move from 425 Broadway to 500 Broadway, because now those moves are behind us. Read on for details, including to what extent we are "open for business".

The Stanford ePADD team has been invited to demo the software at the Computation + Journalism Symposium 2016. Demonstrations will take place on September 30, 5-7 pm, in the courtyard adjacent to Paul Brest Hall on the Stanford campus.

Soon after, in early October, we will head to New York for our partner meeting, to discuss specifications for version 3.0, which is expected to release in February 2017. New York University has graciously offered to host our two-day meeting.
 
Stanford University Libraries in Redwood City - construction photo

Most of the community is aware of the planned development for Stanford’s Redwood City Campus. What few of you may be aware of is that four departments from the Stanford University Libraries (SUL) moved out to Redwood City three years ago. We have been working out of 425 Broadway which is one of the buildings slated for demolition. The development of the new campus necessitates SUL’s relocation from 425 across the street to 500 Broadway – the former home of AMPEX.

The four units moving are: Stanford University Press, Conservation Services, Stanford Media Preservation Lab, and Technical Services branch of Special Collections. SUL staff in these four units have been working for over a year with SUL’s Facilities Department on planning for this interim space. I say interim, because in another 2.5 years, we’ll be moving back onto the new campus. 

An assortment of photos from the Kojima family papers

A few weekends ago I went to the relatively-newly reopened SFMOMA. Their exhibition "About Time: Photography in a Moment of Change" features artist Jason Lazarus' installation Recordings #3 (At sea), 2014-2016. It's a wall of found photographs hung so that the actual photograph faces the wall, with only the text written on the back of the photo visible to the viewer.

Canzonetta (detail)

Canzonetta for cello and piano [1882]
by Alfredo Piatti (1822-1901)

[download images of this work]

Carlo Alfredo Piatti (1822-1901) was one of the most famous cellists of the 19th century.  Born in Bergamo, Italy, he began his cello studies at age 5 with his uncle. At age 7 he played in the local opera orchestra. In his teens, he studied at the Milan Conservatory and then began touring Europe. After meeting Liszt in Munich, the pianist invited Piatti to share a concert billing in Paris. There, Liszt presented Piatti with a fine Amati cello, having learned that he was playing on borrowed instruments after having to sell his cello during hard times on the road. Piatti later owned a fine Stradivarius cello, now nicknamed the “Piatti.” The book, The Adventures of a Cello, chronicles this instrument's story from its creation in Cremona in 1720 to the present day.

Robert Schumann, Drei zweistimmige Lieder (detail)

Rare Music Materials at Stanford is a Spotlight instance that presents materials from the Stanford University Libraries' collections that have been digitized in response to research requests, or were produced for small projects. Items and their downloadable images may also be found in SearchWorks, Stanford's library catalog.

Franz Schubert

Overture zum 3. Akt, Die Zauberharfe, original manuscript by Franz Schubert (1797-1828); libretto by Georg von Hofmann.
Memorial Library of Music, MLM 948
[download images of this work]

Guest blogger: Benjamin Ory

Die Zauberharfe, or “The Magic Harp,” was a melodrama premiered on August 19, 1820 at the Theater an der Wien in Vienna. The original cast included Ferdinand Schimon (Palmerin, tenor), Karl Erdmann Rüger (Arnulf), Josefa Gottdank (Melinda), Frl. Botta (Ida), and Nikolaus Heurteur (Folko). There were seven repeat performances through October 12, before the work was subsequently withdrawn from the repertory. The majority of Hofmann’s text and some of the musical numbers were lost, and thus, no further staged performances were able to occur. The manuscript of the Act III Overture now resides in Stanford’s Memorial Library of Music.

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