Blog topic: Manuscripts

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ePADD 5.1 released!

We are very excited to announce the release of ePADD 5.1! ePADD is free and open-source computational analysis software developed by Special Collections & University Archives and partners, that facilitates screening, browsing, and access for historically and culturally significant email collections.

Read on for more about the release, and the latest news from the project team.

Bob Cooney participating in 1973 demonstration, U.S. Federal Building, San Francisco; Journal of the Institute for the Study of Non-Violence, March-April, 1973

New Anti-Vietnam War, Nonviolence archive open for research: Robert P. J. Cooney, Jr. papers on the Institute for the Study of Nonviolence, 1965-1987

May 2, 2018
by Benjamin Lee Stone

In the wake of a number of anniversaries marking fifty years since the Vietnam War, including last October’s commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Stop the Draft Week, the largest militant anti-Vietnam War demonstration up to that time, the Stanford Libraries are pleased to announce the acquisition and opening of the papers of activist, author, and graphic designer Robert P.J. Cooney, Jr., including a substantial amount of archival material from the Institute for the Study of Nonviolence during the 1970s.

The Interior Lives of Women

March 26, 2018
by Michelle Paquette

The thing I love most about working in Archives and Special Collections is the opportunity I get to glimpse into the lives of individuals and get a sense of their thoughts and feelings. I’m particularly interested in learning about the interior lives of women, especially as women are often underrepresented in the archival record, including in Stanford’s own collections. I did a (very rough, very inexact) examination of about 2300 collections held by Stanford’s Manuscripts Division, looking specifically at collections 1 box or more. Looking only at collections centered around a particular individual or family, the rough math worked out to about 72% of collections centered on men, 22% centered on women, and 6% centered on families. Again, these numbers aren’t exact, but the collections are undoubtedly dominated by men.

With that said, I’d like to highlight some moments from the lives three women represented in our collections: Edith M. Garretson Davies, Nellie Kono, and Marilyn Lyttle.

Special Collections welcomes Sally DeBauche

March 9, 2018
by Glynn Edwards

Please join us in welcoming our new Digital Archivist, Sally DeBauche, who will start work on April 2nd. Sally will be responsible for reviewing workflows and for making the acquired- and born-digital materials that are received in Special Collections available for research. She will join Stanford's ePADD project team as well as become involved with other projects related to digital materials. While she will be based primarily at the Library’s Redwood City facility, you will also see her on campus.

Bill O’Hanlon retiring from RWC-branch of Special Collections

February 2, 2018
by Glynn Edwards

As Bill states in his retirement letter: “With over thirty-two years of service to the University, seventeen with the Library, and fifteen with Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), it is time to move forward to the next phase of my life.” A devotee of history, Bill had one break during his tenure at Stanford when he returned to school for an MA in History. Although he began at SLAC as a surveyor, he went back there to work in their archives. Later, after moving to Special Collections, he followed his history degree with an MLIS.

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